Turn on thread page Beta

I'm a makeup artist/nail tech/beauty therapist AMA watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    As above.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Do you do males as well? What kind of things do you do for males?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Men come for treatments with girlfriends/wives to spas. It wasn't unusual to have up to one third male clients in one day. Treatments popular with male clients are back massages and scalp massages although some enjoy a facial treatment or pedicure or reflexology.

    Some therapists refuse to treat male clients but that's usually female beauty therapists who work alone who may choose to err on the side of caution.

    I don't know many people who offer male waxing because it's a different technique to female waxing and not many people choose to train in it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    As above.
    How do you use eyeliner (liquid) I'm terrible at it xD Even if I don't attempt a winged look
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ujuo_)
    How do you use eyeliner (liquid) I'm terrible at it xD Even if I don't attempt a winged look
    Does it have to be liquid? If so practice a lot and youtube tutorials and an insane amount of patience. Work as near the lash line as possible. Stretching the eyelid gently across can help but it depends on the shape of your eyes.

    Otherwise I would recommend an eyeliner pencil or crayon. You can get a dramatic look with these and in all honesty the black eyeliner pencils from Primark are excellent because they go on easily and they stay on too. Because they go on easily you've got a lot more control over the application.

    Personally, for day to day wear I would recommend well applied pencil over the pitfalls of liquid liner.
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    Men come for treatments with girlfriends/wives to spas. It wasn't unusual to have up to one third male clients in one day. Treatments popular with male clients are back massages and scalp massages although some enjoy a facial treatment or pedicure or reflexology.

    Some therapists refuse to treat male clients but that's usually female beauty therapists who work alone who may choose to err on the side of caution.

    I don't know many people who offer male waxing because it's a different technique to female waxing and not many people choose to train in it.
    I tried deep tissue massage with a masseuse but was disappointed with the treatment since she was quite soft on the massaging part. I did ask her to put more pressure but didn't feel what I expected to feel.

    Is it because the masseuse is being 'too' careful of applying pressure?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by kka25)
    I tried deep tissue massage with a masseuse but was disappointed with the treatment since she was quite soft on the massaging part. I did ask her to put more pressure but didn't feel what I expected to feel.

    Is it because the masseuse is being 'too' careful of applying pressure?
    Could be a number of reasons: inexperience, poor technique (further down your career it's typical to learn to massage with arms and elbows but a lot of people when starting out use fingers and thumbs and there's only so much you can do with that).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    Does it have to be liquid? If so practice a lot and youtube tutorials and an insane amount of patience. Work as near the lash line as possible. Stretching the eyelid gently across can help but it depends on the shape of your eyes.

    Otherwise I would recommend an eyeliner pencil or crayon. You can get a dramatic look with these and in all honesty the black eyeliner pencils from Primark are excellent because they go on easily and they stay on too. Because they go on easily you've got a lot more control over the application.

    Personally, for day to day wear I would recommend well applied pencil over the pitfalls of liquid liner.

    Lol, I didn't know and i was shopping with a friend and she said I should get it so yup xD Thanks for the advice though.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    As above.
    What's your current work situation?
    Are you able to find full-time work (non retail) (and to what degree of difficulty) or are you freelancing?
    Where are you based?
    How many years of experience?

    My gf is also a make-up artist but looking to start her career in London. She has experience already but is starting in London with no contacts. Any tips would be appreciated.

    Thank you.
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    How did you get started as a makeup artist? My sister wants to be one
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    Do you enjoy it?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I think for a lot of people the makeup/nails/beauty industry is not the most profitable. Self employed work can be sporadic due to supply and demand and working for others isn't well paid. Freelancing bridal and prom work is sporadic but enjoyable and a good portfolio opportunity if you're organised.

    I've got five years experience but you're always learning. You need to be qualified for insurance and often employment purposes. There are still more courses and projects I want to do even if they won't be that profitable.

    Networking can be a necessary evil. Personally I don't enjoy it so prefer small time work to be honest. A good way to get started is with a good portfolio so it is worth networking with appropriate groups on Facebook. Non profit collaborations with photographers and models also looking to build a portfolio can be a good start.

    (Original post by NX172)
    What's your current work situation?
    Are you able to find full-time work (non retail) (and to what degree of difficulty) or are you freelancing?
    Where are you based?
    How many years of experience?

    My gf is also a make-up artist but looking to start her career in London. She has experience already but is starting in London with no contacts. Any tips would be appreciated.

    Thank you.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Fat Rudeboi)
    How did you get started as a makeup artist? My sister wants to be one
    You don't have to do a course but it is something I believe in. There are a lot of cons out there so I would recommend getting a legit qualifications at college because it proves you are of a certain standard and the length of the course can maximise your scope for practice and feedback. Courses range from part time to full time. Some cover fashion makeup and some are more biased towards special effects so it is worth shopping around. This is what I did.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Do you enjoy it?
    Yes and no..Once qualified I did a lot of spa work because that's where the work was for me at the time. Employers can be unscrupulous in this industry so it's important to be selective about who you work for. I currently do treatments on friends and family for pleasure and to keep my skills up. I do more nails these days and want to further my makeup training for the purposes of teaching in a college post teacher training. Working in a spa has a shelf life because the work is very physical and so many jobs in the industry in general are so low paid.

    So yes I do enjoy nails/beauty/makeup as a hobby and skill I want to share with others but rightly or wrongly I'm probably not the strongest advocate for the industry itself because I believe it is more of a short term career for a lot of people. That said it was an enjoyable and worthwhile period of my working life so I can't fault it in that regard. It can be creative and sociable which are pluses.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    Yes and no..Once qualified I did a lot of spa work because that's where the work was for me at the time. Employers can be unscrupulous in this industry so it's important to be selective about who you work for. I currently do treatments on friends and family for pleasure and to keep my skills up. I do more nails these days and want to further my makeup training for the purposes of teaching in a college post teacher training. Working in a spa has a shelf life because the work is very physical and so many jobs in the industry in general are so low paid.

    So yes I do enjoy nails/beauty/makeup as a hobby and skill I want to share with others but rightly or wrongly I'm probably not the strongest advocate for the industry itself because I believe it is more of a short term career for a lot of people. That said it was an enjoyable and worthwhile period of my working life so I can't fault it in that regard. It can be creative and sociable which are pluses.
    In what way are employers often unscrupulous?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hellodave5)
    In what way are employers often unscrupulous?
    A lot of employers in the service and trade industry will offer to pay you cash in hand whilst wanting to treat you as an employee. There are laws on this so it is important to know your rights. A lot of legit employers use zero hours contracts which is fine but it's important to assert that these are not being abused (if working for someone who handles zero hours contracts well, in my experience it can be ok. It all comes down to the individual employer).
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
    A lot of employers in the service and trade industry will offer to pay you cash in hand whilst wanting to treat you as an employee. There are laws on this so it is important to know your rights. A lot of legit employers use zero hours contracts which is fine but it's important to assert that these are not being abused (if working for someone who handles zero hours contracts well, in my experience it can be ok. It all comes down to the individual employer).
    Sorry to hear about that.
    It rings a bell, with my cousin having trained in your area at college and worked in a shop for a bit, but had similar payment arrangements - I think on like a commission basis?

    I'm glad that you enjoy your field and work though, despite problems that you have maybe had in the past with employers.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: November 12, 2015
Poll
Do you think parents should charge rent?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.