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What to do when the teacher puts you on the spot? watch

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    I am in Year 10 and I have a Speaking Exam coming up in 2 days. I have been followinga tip from someone on how to revise for the exam is to write the answers down again and again until you have memorised it and then practice it yourself again and again. But the problem is that the teacher told me that he will be throwing in surprise questions and I might be put on the spot. The thing is I am horrible at French and I don't know what to do or how to answer him when I am being put on the spot during the Exam. Help please
    (Speaking Exam is about Healthy lifestye/sports/drugs)
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    I'm assuming at this point you're doing the test tomorrow, so I hope you've been learning the answers you prepared (and not doing what my friends tend to do, cramming it all the night before). I do French GCSE so I can understand what you're going through slightly. I think the only difference between us is that your teacher is doing what he probably should be doing and not giving you any hints, while my teacher warns us what sort of thing the question will be on and gives us tips to prepare us for it. Probably borderline cheating but I'm guessing it's some sort of loophole. Anyway, what I'd recommend is:
    1. look through all your notes and the questions you know you will be asked. I would be amazed if the surprise question is similar to them because the exam boards don't tend to ask you the same things all the time. Use these to predict what sort of things you might be asked.
    2. Second of all, make sure you can pronounce the key words correctly and know your grammar. Even if you don't say a lot I'm pretty sure you get marks for pronunciation as well as everything else. My surprise question answers were never that long and I'm currently working at an A grade.
    3. Thirdly, listen to the question closely. The more words you recognize the better for obvious reasons, but even if you don't understand exactly what you're being asked but know it's something to do with your family or friends (famille / copains or amis) then just say something that's related to those things. This tip also applies to listening assessments; look out for key words and take a guess based on that.

    In short, if you really don't know what to do, just say something and you might get marks. Don't just sit there with your mouth hanging open going "uhhh" because that's the same as leaving a multiple choice question blank on an exam.
 
 
 
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