Can I use the word "dynamic" in this way ?

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zedeneye1
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Is it correct if I use the word "dynamic" this way ?

"The wealthy elite of today are a dynamic group of people where one can find newly rich entering the group and many losing their fortunes and exiting the group as well."
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zedeneye1
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bump anyone ?

or is it the wrong section ?!?!?!?
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pecora
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It sounds alright, dynamic works well in that context. I'd work on the style though and make it clearer — personally I had to read the sentence twice to understand what you want to say. And also, is that statement even correct? I mean, once you're in the wealthy elite, you're rich for good, really.
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TorpidPhil
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Just don't use the word dynamic. It's awful. Makes me cringe everytime I hear it. Use atmosphere instead if you want to use that sort of dynamic and just never use any of other sort of dynamic.
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zedeneye1
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(Original post by pecora)
It sounds alright, dynamic works well in that context. I'd work on the style though and make it clearer — personally I had to read the sentence twice to understand what you want to say. And also, is that statement even correct? I mean, once you're in the wealthy elite, you're rich for good, really.
Well, in the context I was going to compare how say a 200 years ago, the wealthy were a static (am I using this right ? :P ) group of people, where a vast majority was only born with the wealth. While today, the majority isn't born into it, they earn it.
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pecora
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(Original post by zedeneye1)
Well, in the context I was going to compare how say a 200 years ago, the wealthy were a static (am I using this right ? :P ) group of people, where a vast majority was only born with the wealth. While today, the majority isn't born into it, they earn it.
Yeah, I understand what you mean but I'm not sure that's the nicest expression to use (bare in mind, English is my third language though). I'd just scrap the whole overly fancy dynamic/static comparison and just describe the idea in normal words.

I'm sure there are some sociological or historical terms for this. You could say that in the past the status (and therefore wealth) was ascribed rather than achieved, for instance.
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