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S01 - SOI from The Department of the Environment, Energy and Climate Change watch

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    Statement of Intent from The Department of the Environment, Energy and Climate Change, the Rt. Hon. James Milibanter MP
    Statement of Intent from The Department of the Environment, Energy and Climate Change

    The Rt. Hon. James Milibanter MP
    Introduction

    My plans are to produce build 7 Tidal fences and 7 Nuclear Power stations here in the UK. They will produce 26% of the UKs entire annual energy needs, create 40,000 jobs and revive the Norther industrial Heartland. I believe that the Public sector has a large role to play in the energy sector and given how the current UK energy market has begun to turn into an oligopoly it's important that the government introduces further competition. We will lead the charge for clean energy, and in time private companies will follow, we're already seeing Siemens open a offshore wind turbine factory in Hull and the Hinkley Point power plant will be a testament to what we can achieve with help from other governments and is a great example of diplomacy.

    Tidal power

    A “Severn fence” will be built from Brean Down in Somerset to Lavernock Point in Wales which is about 10km in distance. It would cost about £1.5bn to build. The fence is a string of linked turbines, each of which will start generating electricity as it is completed, until the whole array is producing power. The fence’s total output is 5.2TWh which is about the same as a small nuclear reactor’s worth but would cost much less as an initial investment and with no future fuel costs and very little upkeep and maintenance required.


    ^visual representation of the Transverse Horizontal Axis Water Turbine

    A “Dee Fence” will be built from Talacre to Holyake at a distance of 8km. It will be built at a cost of £1.2bn and using the same Transverse Horizontal Axis Water Turbine that will be used on the Severn Fence. It will produce about 4.8TWh of energy.

    A “Solway Fence” will be built from Eggerness to Knockbrex at a distance of 10km. It will be built at a cost of £1.5bn and will produce 5.2TWh of energy.

    A “Thames Fence” will be built from Sheerness to Shoeburyness at a distance of 10km. It will be built at a cost of £1.6bn and will produce 5.2TWh of energy.

    A “St. Bride’s Fence” will be built from St. Brides to Solva at a distance of 10km. It will be built at a cost of £1.5bn and produce 5.2TWh of energy.

    A “Morcambe Fence will be built from Morecambe to Baycliffe at a distance of 10km. It will be built at a cost of £1.5bn and produce 5.2TWh of energy.

    An “Edinburgh Fence” will be built Newhaven to Burntisland at a distance of 10km. It will be built at a cost of £1.5bn and produce 5.2TWh of energy.

    These Tidal Fences would cost in total £10.3bn to build, create 15,000 jobs altogether, and provide 36TWh of energy which is about 12% of all UK energy needs. On top of this they take about 4 years in total to build including planning and licensing.

    The Fences will also account for 47% of all renewable energy output in the UK

    The main advantages for tidal power are as follows:

    Once you've built it, tidal power is free.
    It produces no greenhouse gases or other waste.
    It needs no fuel.
    It produces electricity reliably.
    Not expensive to maintain.
    Tides are totally predictable.
    Offshore turbines and vertical-axis turbines are not ruinously expensive to build and do not have a large environmental impact.

    Each Fence would have a lifespan of around 150 years, which would mean that for at least 100 years, these fences would generate some of the cheapest electricity in the UK. Because the turbines sit horizontally beneath the surface of the sea, they can be sited in water shallower than the 30-metre depth typically required by current designs. And because the water is slow-moving, fish can safely avoid the turbines’ blades. So eco systems will barely be affected.

    The characteristics (in terms of swept area and ability to exploit blockage) of the turbine in tidal fence format (for example in 20m of water, with peak spring flows of 2m/sec) are such that it should have around two to three times the power output of an array of conventional axial turbines, with levelised costs proportionally even lower.

    Nuclear Power

    One nuclear power station will be built in Macosquin near Colerain in Northern Ireland and will be called the “Ulster Nuclear Power Plant”. The land will be purchased at a price of £500,000, and the station will be built at a price of £6bn. It will generate 800MW of power on average.

    A nuclear power station will be built near **** Bridge in Aberdeenshire and will be called the “Scottish Highlands Power Plant”, the land will be purchased at a cost of £350,000 and the station will be built at a price of £6bn. It will generate 800MW of power on average.

    A nuclear power station will be built near Horsley in the North-East of England and will be called the “Tyne Nuclear Power Plant”, the land will be purchased at a cost of £600,000 and the station will be built at a price of £6bn. It will generate 800MW of power on average.

    A nuclear power station will be built near South Ferriby in Yorkshire and will be called the “Humber Nuclear Power Plant”, the land will be purchased at cost of £600,000 and the station will be built at a price of £6bn. It will generate 800MW of power on average.

    A nuclear power station will be built near Bontnewydd in North West Wales and will be called the “North Wales Nuclear Power Plant”, the land will be purchased at a cost of £600,000 and the station will be built at a price of £6bn. It will generate 800MW of power on average.

    A nuclear power station will be built near Ashfield in the West Midlands and will be called the “Trent Nuclear Power Plant”, the land will be purchased at a cost of £600,000 and the station will be built at a price of £6bn. It will generate 800MW of power on average.

    A nuclear power station will be built near Wisbech in Cambridgeshire and will be called the “Norfolk Nuclear Power Plant”, the land will be purchased at a cost of £600,000 and the station will be built at a price of £6bn. It will generate 800MW of power on average.

    These 7 nuclear power stations built at a total cost of £45.85bn and will produce 49TWh of energy annually which is about 16% of all UK energy needs.

    Summary and Commencement

    Construction of a new nuclear power plant requires up to 3,500 workers at peak construction, providing significant boosts to local economies. All Power stations are within commuting distance of at least one city. The Ulster Nuclear Power Station is within Commuting distance of the entirety of Northern Ireland. The Highlands Nuclear Power Station is within commuting distance of Aberdeen and Dundee. The Tyne Nuclear Power Station is within commuting distance of Newcastle, Sunderland, Middlesbrough, Durham, Darlington and Carlisle. The Humber Nuclear Power Station is within commuting distance of Sheffield, Leeds, Rotherham, Huddersfield, Hull and York. The North Wales Nuclear Power Station is within commuting distance of Liverpool and Chester. The Trent Nuclear Power Station is within commuting distance of Stoke, Derby, Nottingham, Wolverhampton and Birmingham. The Norfolk Nuclear Power Station is within Commuting distance of Norwich, Peterborough and Cambridge.

    Construction of a new nuclear power plant will provide a substantial boost to suppliers of commodities like concrete and steel and manufacturers of hundreds of components. For example, a single new nuclear power plant requires approximately:
    400,000 cubic yards of concrete
    66,000 tons of steel
    44 miles of piping
    300 miles of electric wiring
    130,000 electrical components.

    Given the neglect some of these places have suffered from previous governments, the 25,000 jobs that will be created from these builds as well as the jobs created from the supply of goods and the boost to local economies this will create over the seven years it takes to build them, our government will actually be able to provide a northern powerhouse in its most literal sense.

    Construction of the Severn Fence, Edinburgh Fence, Thames Fence, St’ Brides Fence, Ulster Nuclear Power Plant and the Scottish Highlands Power Plant will commence on the 1st of February 2016 and will be given the full £18.95bn of investment.

    Construction of the Dee Fence, Solway Fence, Morecambe Fence, Tyne Nuclear Power Plant and the Humber Nuclear Power Plant will commence the following year on the 1st of February 2017 and will be given the full £16.2bn of investment.

    Construction of the North Wales Nuclear Power Plant, Trent Nuclear Power Plant and the Norfolk Nuclear Power Plant will commence on the 1st of February 2018 and will be given the full £18bn of investment.



    A map placing all of my energy proposals.
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    Aye, obviously
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    Has my full support of course.
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    Spell Coleraine right and I'll give you an aye.

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    Of course I support this.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    Spell Coleraine right and I'll give you an aye.
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    Of course I support this.
    ****, after all that effort, I was bound to make a typo
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    Aye.
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    (Original post by James Milibanter)
    ****, after all that effort, I was bound to make a typo
    I pointed it out in the Gov forum too!
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    I pointed it out in the Gov forum too!
    I got preoccupied with all the other typos and forgot to correct the one that was actually pointed out .
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    Yuppity yup.
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    Very good indeed.
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    (Original post by James Milibanter)
    I got preoccupied with all the other typos and forgot to correct the one that was actually pointed out .
    Oh Jimmy Boy.
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    Aye, but change the name of the power plant near Derry.
    Derry power plant or Coleraine power plant.

    There ain't no Ulster in the UK.
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    (Original post by nebelbon)
    Very good indeed.
    Cheers, is that an Aye then?
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    My right honourable friend demonstrates his suitability for the office he holds.
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    (Original post by James Milibanter)
    Cheers, is that an Aye then?
    Yep
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    The tidal fences utilise unproven technology and the company behind them, Kepler Energy, have not even received funding yet. Is it wise to commit over £10 billion on something which hasn't been tested at scale? They have a 1km fence that may generate 30MW planned for 2020, a far cry from the time-scale and 10km lengths you require. I also find the estimate of costing for the fences to be simplistic. Extrapolating from the expected £143m for the above fence seems too abstract.

    Where did you get your figures for your nuclear plants from?
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    (Original post by DMcGovern)
    Aye, but change the name of the power plant near Derry.
    Derry power plant or Coleraine power plant.

    There ain't no Ulster in the UK.
    It's neither, the closest place to it is Macosquin, and seeing as Ulster is the broadest region of Ireland the plant sits in I figured that was a decent name for it.
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    Aye
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    Has the fence been proven to work yet? If so, why not one for the Humber Estuary too?

    Also, as much as I love nuclear fission; is there a compromise that could be struck for less of it?

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    (Original post by The Financier)
    The fences utilise unproven technology and the company behind them, Kepler Energy, have not even received funding yet. Is it wise to commit over £10 billion on something which hasn't been tested at scale? They have a 1km fence that may generate 30MW planned for 2020, a far cry from the 10km lengths you require. I also find the estimate of costing for the fences to be simplistic. Extrapolating from the expected £143m for the above fence seems too abstract.

    Where did you get your figures for your nuclear plants from?
    The fences developed at oxford university with Kepler have undergone serious testing and by all means are fit for purpose.

    The land costs for the plants have been based off of average costs of land fit for a power plant in the specific areas. The costs for the power plants have been costed using figures for a small-medium size plant. These plants are going to be nowhere near the size of Hinkley point in Somerset (which I have no plans of stopping) so it's based on a whole load of research I did into costings of nuclear power stations.
 
 
 
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