NanuNaru
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Hi,
I have my French Controlled Assessment tomorrow and when revising I found the opportunity to add the subjunctive tense, but since I am writing in the past I am not sure how conjugate the verb.

This is the sentence:
Although I was tired, it was fantastic.

Would the 'I was' become:

-je sois
-je fusse
-j'aie été

Please help me!

Thank you!
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Exephy
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Technically, it should be: Bien que je fusse fatigué
But to be honest "bien que j'étais fatigué" is accepted in everyday spoken french. I would stick to using subjunctive in the present, and avoid the problem here by saying something like: meme si j'étais fatigué, malgré ma fatigue etc.
That said, you could say "Bien que fatigué" and get the best of both worlds.

p.s j'aie été is totally fine too
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NanuNaru
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Thank you so much! I used j'aie été, in the end!
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NanuNaru
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(Original post by Exephy)
Technically, it should be: Bien que je fusse fatigué
But to be honest "bien que j'étais fatigué" is accepted in everyday spoken french. I would stick to using subjunctive in the present, and avoid the problem here by saying something like: meme si j'étais fatigué, malgré ma fatigue etc.
That said, you could say "Bien que fatigué" and get the best of both worlds.

p.s j'aie été is totally fine too
Actually one more question: you said 'Bien que fatigué'- how does that work? Please could you explain, I'm actually really interested!
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Exephy
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(Original post by Nandaja)
Actually one more question: you said 'Bien que fatigué'- how does that work? Please could you explain, I'm actually really interested!
It's like saying "Although tired" In english, as in "although tired, I was still able to do my homework"
Bien que fatigué, j'ai encore pu faire mes devoirs. Hope this clears things up !
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NanuNaru
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(Original post by Exephy)
It's like saying "Although tired" In english, as in "although tired, I was still able to do my homework"
Bien que fatigué, j'ai encore pu faire mes devoirs. Hope this clears things up !
Thank you so much!
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Exephy
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(Original post by Nandaja)
Thank you so much!
No problem haha, good luck in your CA
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beyknowles2
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(Original post by Nandaja)
Hi,
I have my French Controlled Assessment tomorrow and when revising I found the opportunity to add the subjunctive tense, but since I am writing in the past I am not sure how conjugate the verb.

This is the sentence:
Although I was tired, it was fantastic.

Would the 'I was' become:

-je sois
-je fusse
-j'aie été

Please help me!

Thank you!
Bien que je fusse fatigué(e)


(Original post by Exephy)
It's like saying "Although tired" In english, as in "although tired, I was still able to do my homework"
Bien que fatigué, j'ai encore pu faire mes devoirs. Hope this clears things up !
I'm pretty certain that a subjunctive phrases must be followed by a subject and not just a past participle. Because the subjunctive mood is used so you can tell the difference from the indicative i.e. if you want to express doubt or will etc. That wouldn't be possible with a past participle. If Subjunctive phrase + past participle actually exists as you've suggested then I am doubting my French capabilities right now

Sorry, Exephy, it seems as though I'm frequently quoting you recently with doubt. Know that it's not personal and that I'm doubting my own French ability, not yours :P
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NanuNaru
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(Original post by beyknowles2)
Bien que je fusse fatigué(e)



I'm pretty certain that a subjunctive phrases must be followed by a subject and not just a past participle. Because the subjunctive mood is used so you can tell the difference from the indicative i.e. if you want to express doubt or will etc. That wouldn't be possible with a past participle. If Subjunctive phrase + past participle actually exists as you've suggested then I am doubting my French capabilities right now

Sorry, Exephy, it seems as though I'm frequently quoting you recently with doubt. Know that it's not personal and that I'm doubting my own French ability, not yours :P
Thank you for your reply, I think I will go with j'aie été because I was online and found that je fusse is apparently very old fashioned!
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NanuNaru
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(Original post by Exephy)
No problem haha, good luck in your CA
Thanks
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beyknowles2
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(Original post by Nandaja)
Thank you for your reply, I think I will go with j'aie été because I was online and found that je fusse is apparently very old fashioned!
Well I wouldn't say old fashioned, it's just that in everyday spoken language, the average French person wouldn't say "Bien que je fusse fatigué", they would perhaps say "J'étais fatigué mais je l'ai fait quand même" or something like that. Just like in English, it'd be weird to hear a teenager say "Our new French teacher advises (that) we be (subjunctive) two minutes early for lesson, lest we fail to find seats next to one other". It's much too formal for spoken language. However if you wrote in such a sophisticated manor in an English exam, it would sure be impressive!
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NanuNaru
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(Original post by beyknowles2)
Well I wouldn't say old fashioned, it's just that in everyday spoken language, the average French person wouldn't say "Bien que je fusse fatigué", they would perhaps say "J'étais fatigué mais je l'ai fait quand même" or something like that. Just like in English, it'd be weird to hear a teenager say "Our new French teacher advises (that) we be (subjunctive) two minutes early for lesson, lest we fail to find seats next to one other". It's much too formal for spoken language. However if you wrote in such a sophisticated manor in an English exam, it would sure be impressive!
Ok I understand, thanks! In your opinion do you believe that j'aie été also works?
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beyknowles2
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(Original post by Nandaja)
Ok I understand, thanks! In your opinion do you believe that j'aie été also works?
mais ouais definitivement !!
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Exephy
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(Original post by beyknowles2)
Bien que je fusse fatigué(e)



I'm pretty certain that a subjunctive phrases must be followed by a subject and not just a past participle. Because the subjunctive mood is used so you can tell the difference from the indicative i.e. if you want to express doubt or will etc. That wouldn't be possible with a past participle. If Subjunctive phrase + past participle actually exists as you've suggested then I am doubting my French capabilities right now

Sorry, Exephy, it seems as though I'm frequently quoting you recently with doubt. Know that it's not personal and that I'm doubting my own French ability, not yours :P
Haha, no problem In this case I am pretty sure it can be used in this way, I've definitely heard it spoken/seen it written before. How common it is I don't know, but its definitely understandable. I have a feeling we're going to have to resort to agreeing to disagree on a lot of these issues, lol.
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beyknowles2
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(Original post by Exephy)
Haha, no problem In this case I am pretty sure it can be used in this way, I've definitely heard it spoken/seen it written before. How common it is I don't know, but its definitely understandable. I have a feeling we're going to have to resort to agreeing to disagree on a lot of these issues, lol.
(Original post by Josb)
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Qu'en penses tu? On peut dire "bien que fatigué, j'ai.." ou non? Et est-ce que l'on utilise souvent cette phrase/construction en français parlé?
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Josb
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(Original post by beyknowles2)
Qu'en penses tu? On peut dire "bien que fatigué, j'ai.." ou non? Et est-ce que l'on utilise souvent cette phrase/construction en français parlé?
In written French, yes. In spoken French, we'd say "Même si j'étais fatigué, j'ai"
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beyknowles2
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(Original post by Josb)
In written French, yes. In spoken French, we'd say "Même si j'étais fatigué, j'ai"
Thanks for your input ! There we have it.
It's surprising that I've never come across it before, but I don't read a lot so that's undoubtedly why
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