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Do you feel your degree was "worth it"? watch

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    For those mature students who had a good job before starting their degree, do you feel the price of your course and the time off full time work was worth it?

    I would be starting at 24. I am not sure if the money is worth a degree or not. Would I be getting as much of a "social experience" as the 18/19 year olds even if I lived in halls, went out partying etc?
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    I am 23 and I started university at 21, I am in my second year. There is a lot of social aspects of university but not sure on the party scene as I don't go out clubbing! I hope my degree comes in handy as I don't want to clean toilets for the rest of my life (yes, shamefully, that is what I do! Student life eh...).

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    (Original post by Butterfly92xo)
    I am 23 and I started university at 21, I am in my second year. There is a lot of social aspects of university but not sure on the party scene as I don't go out clubbing! I hope my degree comes in handy as I don't want to clean toilets for the rest of my life (yes, shamefully, that is what I do! Student life eh...).

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    Nothing wrong with cleaning toilets as a part or even full time job IMO lots of people can't even find a job.

    What are you studying? Do you feel the price is worth it?
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    What will you be studying?
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    Time off full time work is what most people dream of, after a few years of the 9-5 drudge. Make the most of it! I managed to drag uni out for nearly seven years and it was paradise compared to the preceding 20+ of soul-corroding day jobs.

    If you add my student debt (£20k, which is pretty small beer by today's standards) to my lost earnings (£45k a year) that's well over a quarter of a million quid that my degree, Masters and unfinished PhD have cost me. I'm poor as a particularly broke church mouse. And every time I met up with the people who still work at my old employer, they're jealous of me and I'm bloody grateful to have escaped.

    I used to hate my life and job, which gave me a chronic illness. Now I love my life - never been happier. Was my degree "worth it"? To me, yes. Every single penny. But it's very much an individual thing.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Time off full time work is what most people dream of, after a few years of the 9-5 drudge. Make the most of it! I managed to drag uni out for nearly seven years and it was paradise compared to the preceding 20+ of soul-corroding day jobs.

    If you add my student debt (£20k, which is pretty small beer by today's standards) to my lost earnings (£45k a year) that's well over a quarter of a million quid that my degree, Masters and unfinished PhD have cost me. I'm poor as a particularly broke church mouse. And every time I met up with the people who still work at my old employer, they're jealous of me and I'm bloody grateful to have escaped.

    I used to hate my life and job, which gave me a chronic illness. Now I love my life - never been happier. Was my degree "worth it"? To me, yes. Every single penny. But it's very much an individual thing.
    I actually enjoy full time work quite a lot. I would also love to go to uni, though (having been to open days) but am worried about the gap in my career and that I might miss work. You are right it is individual

    What did you work as before/do at uni if you don't mind me asking?
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    Simply put, a professional degree related directly to a job - definitely; a generalist degree which doesn't directly relate to a job, I'm not so sure. Though it feels good to be improving yourself regardless I suppose.
    What course would you be considering?
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Simply put, a professional degree related directly to a job - definitely; a generalist degree which doesn't directly relate to a job, I'm not so sure. Though it feels good to be improving yourself regardless I suppose.
    What course would you be considering?
    Management at somewhere like Warwick. It's definitely not "necessary" but would improve my job prospects.

    I also want to go for the university experience, but am not sure if I could have this anyway as a 24 year old despite being sociable. And it's a lot of money for a social experience
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    (Original post by Fat Rudeboi)
    Management at somewhere like Warwick. It's definitely not "necessary" but would improve my job prospects.

    I also want to go for the university experience, but am not sure if I could have this anyway as a 24 year old despite being sociable. And it's a lot of money for a social experience
    Management sounds good.
    As an investment, I'm not sure I would go through with it. It depends on what your prospects are if you carry on a linear path with what you are and have now; or if you go through university a changed person with new prospects 3 years in the future.

    I had a mate who was 29/30 when first started at uni, and I suppose he was just treated like anyone else even though fair bit older. It is what you make it - the age difference isn't particularly large for you though. You're just a bit older than me and I wouldn't feel out of place on an undergraduate course all that much. Besides, you are all in the same situation, so you generally bond over that.

    There may be other ways of getting a student experience though, like joining societies and online courses.
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    (Original post by hellodave5)
    Management sounds good.
    As an investment, I'm not sure I would go through with it. It depends on what your prospects are if you carry on a linear path with what you are and have now; or if you go through university a changed person with new prospects 3 years in the future.

    I had a mate who was 29/30 when first started at uni, and I suppose he was just treated like anyone else even though fair bit older. It is what you make it - the age difference isn't particularly large for you though. You're just a bit older than me and I wouldn't feel out of place on an undergraduate course all that much. Besides, you are all in the same situation, so you generally bond over that.

    There may be other ways of getting a student experience though, like joining societies and online courses.
    Thanks. I do want to do a degree at some point and feel that the social experience would be better in my 20s but I love my career too. I could potentially work part time but I am also considering things like moving to another country which I couldn't do if I was studying here ofc.

    True, it's not quite the same I guess though
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    (Original post by Fat Rudeboi)
    What did you work as before/do at uni if you don't mind me asking?
    Before, IT - management level.
    After, archaeology.
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    (Original post by Fat Rudeboi)
    Nothing wrong with cleaning toilets as a part or even full time job IMO lots of people can't even find a job.

    What are you studying? Do you feel the price is worth it?
    Social science and not really but lets hope it will reflect when i graduate! University is very expensive nowadays

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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Time off full time work is what most people dream of, after a few years of the 9-5 drudge. Make the most of it! I managed to drag uni out for nearly seven years and it was paradise compared to the preceding 20+ of soul-corroding day jobs.

    I used to hate my life and job, which gave me a chronic illness. Now I love my life - never been happier. Was my degree "worth it"? To me, yes. Every single penny. But it's very much an individual thing.
    I'm with you on that one. Just finished 5 years full time at uni, just the PhD viva to go – and I'm 62. I have no regrets whatsoever. I had a great time socially too. Not clubbing (far too old for that!), but I joined a sports/social club which I have been a prominent member of for the last 4 years. Made a few friends – all a lot younger, but that doesn't bother me and it doesn't seem to bother them. There's too much weight given to the the 'mature' tag – it's who you are, not what you are.
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    I'm hoping to go university at 26. All I have to say is make sure you pick a degree were you'll end up doing a job you like or a degree that gives you a wide range of options.

    After working for a while I realise all jobs suck unless it's one you enjoy doing.
 
 
 
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