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    Is it worth going there? If you are currently attending or have graduated, could you tell me the pros and cons? Do you get a good education? Are you successful afterwards?
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    (Original post by ThisCantBeTaken)
    Is it worth going there? If you are currently attending or have graduated, could you tell me the pros and cons? Do you get a good education? Are you successful afterwards?
    I haven't attended it but I have watched its development over the last few years. I couldn't tell you if it was 'good' but, depending on your household income, you could pay anything between nothing at all and £18,000/year, some of which may have to be paid upfront.

    It's also worth mentioning that it's not a university yet -- you have the choice of either taking a University of London degree or the college's own degree. Because it's not a university yet, it gets its degrees validated by Southampton Solent University -- this is probably not the most reputable university so that's another consideration.

    From what I've seen though, you do get fairly good tuition. The degrees are more like liberal arts degrees than the single-discipline degrees that you can normally expect to study at most British universities. There's also some element of small-group tutorials, so that's another pro.

    Personally, I like the idea of NCH but because it doesn't really have a solid reputation with employers yet, one has to think very carefully about enrolling onto its courses, especially given the price tag.
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    Hey!

    I am one of NCH’s first graduating cohort, graduated a degree in Law with Economics and History, and will be starting a Training Contract with Clifford Chance this year. In my eyes NCH is definitely worth it. I don’t know what your metrics for being 'successful' are, but 88% of my cohort got a 2.1 or a 1st in a humanities subject, and 80% had secured graduate jobs or post-grad opportunities before we even graduated. The destinations include Deutsche Bank, Diageo, Deloitte, Porsche, Hogan Lovells, LSE, UCL, SOAS, City and University of Oxford.

    I really enjoyed my time there, and from my experiences these are the pros and cons

    Pros:
    - You get to study a broad liberal arts-inspired curriculum, which means you get a very well-rounded education. The NCH Diploma with courses in Logic and Critical Thinking, Science Literacy (which explores everything from evolutionary biology to quantum physics) and Applied Ethics mean that you get the opportunity to study an intense and challenging Humanities course, without limiting your education to that domain
    - The opportunity to study a minor and enrichment course means that you explore more of your interests. Humanities are very inter-related so the concepts you cover in these modules will complement your degree studies, and give you unique perspectives and a deeper understanding of the various facets of the ideas/theories/legal principles you cover
    - The academics are incredible. The academics doing your tutorials/seminars and lectures are passionate about their subjects and, in the intimate teaching environment, will get to know you and help you achieve your potential, and explore your personal views on the topics you study
    - The visiting professors (who don’t really need introductions) include Steven Pinker, Richard Dawkins, Daniell Dennet, Lawrence Krauss, Sir Partha Dasgupta, Adrian Zuckerman and Sir Christopher Ricks. NCH has over 100 professorial lectures a year and frequently organises socials/drinks with the Professors afterwards. If you’re interested in their research/recent work it’s an incredible opportunity to discuss it with them (the people undertaking cutting edge work in and essentially shaping their fields)
    - The tutorial system. It’s intense and there’s a lot of work. Writing weekly essays for your weekly one-to-ones and preparing to be drilled, challenged, and asked to debate key principles and your own views may seem a bit daunting, but it really helps you develop the confidence to develop and defend your own arguments (which I found invaluable when I prepared for interviews and assessment days)
    - The location. NCH is based in Bloomsbury, at the heart of the University District, minutes from Student Central, and at the doorstep of London’s incredible night life, pubs, museums, theaters and exhibitions.
    - The size of the College. Being an international student, I found coming to an institution where students, academic staff and student support know you as an individual and not just a student number was a great support system. In addition, you have the opportunity to join all of University of London, UCL, Imperial and Kings’ societies and clubs, so its easy (and encouraged) to engage with the larger London student community
    - The job prospects. As part of your NCH diploma you complete the Professional Development Programme, which through a series of projects and workshops (where you are asked to come up with an idea and build a business plan for your own enterprise, design marketing campaigns for established organisations and complete courses in financial literacy), is a perfect way to develop soft skills that will make you comfortable at assessment days and interviews. NCH also has a designated careers advisor who works with you individually, helping to improve your CV, consider career prospects and begin to plan your career path from your first year. Even if you are unsure of what you want to do, having someone willing to help support you in getting experience in various industries and challenging you to think about the oh-so-daunting post-university plan is an incredible resource
    - In terms of the finances, they are steep, but you get incredible value for money, and the College awards scholarships and means-tested bursaries to well over the 30% of its student body. Having been there for 3 years I couldn’t tell you who is receiving this support, which just speaks to the College’s ethos and diversity.
    - The students and ethos. NCH has an incredible student body of passionate, interested young people who are keen to learn and be challenged, but balance their work with a vibrant, exciting social life.


    Cons
    - It’s a lot of work. If you’re passionate about your subject, it’s incredibly rewarding, but you should expect long hours
    - Because cohorts are small, absences and unpreparedness are noticed, and commented on. But once again, if you’re interested in what you do and inspired by your degree, minor and enrichment course, this shouldn’t be an issue
    - The size of the College; it’s small and you know everyone. This was initially a concern for me, but you DO have the opportunity to engage with other students/get involved with other societies, so it’s less of a con and more of a its-in-your-hands thing
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    (Original post by ThisCantBeTaken)
    Is it worth going there? If you are currently attending or have graduated, could you tell me the pros and cons? Do you get a good education? Are you successful afterwards?
    I'm currently studying at the New College of the Humanities, and can recommend it very highly. When it comes to the tuition fees, you can apply for scholarships and bursaries so that definitely shouldn't stop you from applying. Evidently I can't say anything about success afterwards from personal experience as I am still at the university but know that many of the graduates currently have very good jobs or are studying post-graduate degrees at top universities.

    Every week you have lectures, seminars and tutorials with fantastic academics and learn so much over the course of the degree. The education is unlike anything you would receive at another university. The major/minor system means you get a well-rounded education, in addition to core studies such as critical reasoning, science literacy and the professional program.

    Obviously being in London there is a great social life as well, although the college is small the atmosphere is vibrant and you can join in with University of London events and societies. Some people might view the fact that there are so few students as a downside of the university but I think it's definitely a good thing - the friendships you make are strong and there are enough people for you to find a variety of clubs and societies.

    If you're interested in the university, I would recommend getting in touch with them, they're always more than happy to answer any questions you have and will give you all the information you need.
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    I have applied to study history! They have requested a piece of my written work and are currently in the process of reviewing it. I'll find out in the next few days whether I have been rejected or if I have an interview :eek:. I am incredibly nervous, has anyone else had an offer?
 
 
 
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