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Economics or Finance? To be an Investment Banker watch

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    Hi,
    I will be applying for University courses soon at Universities that are in the top 10.
    I was just wondering, which would be better to do for a degree in order to become an Investment Banker? I am planning to go to a Russell Group Uni that is in the top 10. The Uni's that I am looking at are LSE, Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and Warwick.

    Many Thanks


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    Sorry, let me rephrase the beginning as it may have not made sense.

    I am going to apply to Uni's soon and I will be applying to Uni's that are in the top 10. I was just wondering...(now you can read previous post 😄)


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    (Original post by The1AndOnly1)
    Sorry, let me rephrase the beginning as it may have not made sense.

    I am going to apply to Uni's soon and I will be applying to Uni's that are in the top 10. I was just wondering...(now you can read previous post 😄)


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    The degree is largely irrelevant.

    I'd focus on the targets (where 80% of the UK-contingent of the front office come from): Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick, and Imperial

    Or even the semi-targets (where the rest come from): Durham, Bristol, Nottingham, Bath, KCL are the main ones. With the likes of: Birmingham, Loughborough, Edinburgh, St Andrews, rounding off the list.

    If you can make it into the first group of universities, your life will be a lot easier but the upper end of the second group will suffice too. After that point, you'll struggle to get in but it is still possible.

    I want to re-iterate: your degree subject will not mean anything for most IB or S&T roles (granted there is a bias for more quantitative degrees like Maths, Econ, Computer Science, Engineering on the desks that trade more complex financial products - most vanilla desks don't really mind), a recruiter will just glance over it to get to the rest of your CV - including GCSEs, A-level grades, uni grades, extracurricular activities, leadership roles etc.

    My £0.02 is Finance will prepare you well for IB (M&A) interviews, as you'll have been exposed to the concepts already but it's best to choose whichever you'll enjoy more.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    The degree is largely irrelevant.

    I'd focus on the targets (where 80% of the UK-contingent of the front office come from): Oxford, Cambridge, LSE, UCL, Warwick, and Imperial

    Or even the semi-targets (where the rest come from): Durham, Bristol, Nottingham, Bath, KCL are the main ones. With the likes of: Birmingham, Loughborough, Edinburgh, St Andrews, rounding off the list.

    If you can make it into the first group of universities, your life will be a lot easier but the upper end of the second group will suffice too. After that point, you'll struggle to get in but it is still possible.

    I want to re-iterate: your degree subject will not mean anything for most IB or S&T roles (granted there is a bias for more quantitative degrees like Maths, Econ, Computer Science, Engineering on the desks that trade more complex financial products - most vanilla desks don't really mind), a recruiter will just glance over it to get to the rest of your CV - including GCSEs, A-level grades, uni grades, extracurricular activities, leadership roles etc.

    My £0.02 is Finance will prepare you well for IB (M&A) interviews, as you'll have been exposed to the concepts already but it's best to choose whichever you'll enjoy more.
    Looking at the courses, Finance seems better but is it "traditional" also does Imperial provide economics or finance? I couldn't find that course? Can someone link it please


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    (Original post by The1AndOnly1)
    Looking at the courses, Finance seems better but is it "traditional" also does Imperial provide economics or finance? I couldn't find that course? Can someone link it please


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    No, they don't at the undergrad level. I'm just saying, those, are in general the universities that all IBs target.

    What do you mean by 'traditional'? It's a course, like any other. You learn stuff that can help you when it comes to technical questions in interviews (specifically IBD/M&A), but beyond that, it's just a course.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    No, they don't at the undergrad level. I'm just saying, those, are in general the universities that all IBs target.

    What do you mean by 'traditional'? It's a course, like any other. You learn stuff that can help you when it comes to technical questions in interviews (specifically IBD/M&A), but beyond that, it's just a course.
    As in, what is regarded more highly by employers, this time irrelevant of IB. In general economics or finance?


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    (Original post by The1AndOnly1)
    As in, what is regarded more highly by employers, this time irrelevant of IB. In general economics or finance?


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    Lol, the one that gets you a first or 2:1 more easily. Employers really don't care tbh.
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    (Original post by The1AndOnly1)
    As in, what is regarded more highly by employers, this time irrelevant of IB. In general economics or finance?


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    First Class in Finance > 2:1 in Economics
    First Class in Economics > 2:1 in Finance

    Notice how the course title has no influence on how well regarded the degree is?

    PYRAMIND OF INFLUENCE:

    - UNIVERSITY (TARGET UNI / SEMI-TARGET)
    - DEGREE GRADE (NOT SUBJECT)
    - NETWORKING ABILITY
    - PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE/KNOWLEDGE OF IB


    The only time degree subject matters is when someone is doing a very pointless or non traditional degree like David Beckham studies. But you'll be hard pressed to find those types of courses in any target universities.
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    Finance would probably be more relevant...Economics could be more theoretical as well...
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    First Class in Finance > 2:1 in Economics
    First Class in Economics > 2:1 in Finance

    Notice how the course title has no influence on how well regarded the degree is?

    PYRAMIND OF INFLUENCE:

    - UNIVERSITY (TARGET UNI / SEMI-TARGET)
    - DEGREE GRADE (NOT SUBJECT)
    - NETWORKING ABILITY
    - PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE/KNOWLEDGE OF IB


    The only time degree subject matters is when someone is doing a very pointless or non traditional degree like David Beckham studies. But you'll be hard pressed to find those types of courses in any target universities.
    So work experience is last? From employer reviews looks like work experience is no1 and then follows the degree grade...
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    (Original post by The1AndOnly1)
    Hi,
    I will be applying for University courses soon at Universities that are in the top 10.
    I was just wondering, which would be better to do for a degree in order to become an Investment Banker? I am planning to go to a Russell Group Uni that is in the top 10. The Uni's that I am looking at are LSE, Cambridge, Oxford, Durham and Warwick.

    Many Thanks


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    It doesnt really matter, just have experience, the skills, backed up by the strong acedemics. But to answer your queestion i'd say economics, because its abit more competitive course
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    (Original post by alexkol)
    So work experience is last? From employer reviews looks like work experience is no1 and then follows the degree grade...
    If you're starting off as a grad at university you'll be quite unlikely to have much 'relevant' experience unless you've gone on a few of those Year 12 / 13 schemes.
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    University prestige matters a lot more than your degree prestige. But if you are looking into S&T and generally quantatative roles a highly numerate degree (Maths, Physics, Economics, Computer Science and engineering) are preferred.
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    If you're starting off as a grad at university you'll be quite unlikely to have much 'relevant' experience unless you've gone on a few of those Year 12 / 13 schemes.
    Still, the employers are looking for work experience (not always relevant) as their 1st and most important thing...
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    (Original post by High Stakes)
    If you're starting off as a grad at university you'll be quite unlikely to have much 'relevant' experience unless you've gone on a few of those Year 12 / 13 schemes.
    I'd say the pyramid morphs as you progress through university, so for spring weeks, your ranking is correct (I'd throw in ECs/Leadership stuff too) but as you apply for grad schemes and increasingly but not to the same extent, internships, there is a tendency to place emphasis on prior experience (internships, part time work), not necessarily within the industry, but more generally.



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    So...??? To sum up


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