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    The Avogadro constant is 6.0 x 10^23 mol -1. Therefore the number of atoms in 1 mol of carbon dioxide is:
    A.) 2.0 x 10^23
    B.) 6.0 x 10^23
    C.) 1.2 x 10^24
    D.) 1.8 x 10^24

    Do I use this formula
    Number of moles=
    Number of particles you have / Number of particles in a mole

    If not, how do I and when do I use this formula?

    I don't why I find this really hard and confusing, could someone please explain this to me.
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    (Original post by FluffyCherry)
    The Avogadro constant is 6.0 x 10^23 mol -1. Therefore the number of atoms in 1 mol of carbon dioxide is:
    A.) 2.0 x 10^23
    B.) 6.0 x 10^23
    C.) 1.2 x 10^24
    D.) 1.8 x 10^24

    Do I use this formula
    Number of moles=
    Number of particles you have / Number of particles in a mole

    If not, how do I and when do I use this formula?

    I don't why I find this really hard and confusing, could someone please explain this to me.
    It is quite a confusing thing to get your head around

    Look at the constant and at the units, it says 6.0 x 10^23 mol -1 where the mol^-1 means per mole (think of it as dividing number of atoms by number of moles), so 6.0x10^23 = (number of atoms) / (number of moles).

    So if you have 1 mol of any substance (in this case CO2), how many atoms will it have? (Use the formula above).
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    It is quite a confusing thing to get your head around

    Look at the constant and at the units, it says 6.0 x 10^23 mol -1 where the mol^-1 means per mole (think of it as dividing number of atoms by number of moles), so 6.0x10^23 = (number of atoms) / (number of moles).

    So if you have 1 mol of any substance (in this case Carbon), how many atoms will it have? (Use the formula above).
    Well, is it 1 mol = (number of atoms) idk how you'd find that divide by 44 (number of moles)?! I don't actually know ...
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    (Original post by FluffyCherry)
    Well, is it 1 mol = (number of atoms) idk how you'd find that divide by 44 (number of moles)?! I don't actually know ...
    In any substance 1 mol has 6x10^23 'lots' of it, when it's a single element like Carbon it's just the number of atoms.

    But here we're dealing with 1 mol of CO2, so there are 6x10^23 molecules of CO2 in 1 mol, so using a formula very similar to the one you suggested in the first place, how many atoms are there if CO2 has three atoms per molecule?
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    In any substance 1 mol has 6x10^23 'lots' of it, when it's a single element like Carbon it's just the number of atoms.

    But here we're dealing with 1 mol of CO2, so there are 6x10^23 molecules of CO2 in 1 mol, so using a formula very similar to the one you suggested in the first place, how many atoms are there if CO2 has three atoms per molecule?
    Is it 6.0 x 10^23 x 3? So 1.8 x 10^24
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    In any substance 1 mol has 6x10^23 'lots' of it, when it's a single element like Carbon it's just the number of atoms.

    But here we're dealing with 1 mol of CO2, so there are 6x10^23 molecules of CO2 in 1 mol, so using a formula very similar to the one you suggested in the first place, how many atoms are there if CO2 has three atoms per molecule?
    I agree. For every one molecule of carbon dioxide, there are 3 atoms.

    Therefore, 6x10^23 molecules x 3, you get 1.8x10^24 atoms. Answer is D.

    The formula of Number of moles=
    Number of particles you have / Number of particles in a mole
    is not necessary. The question revolves around your understanding of Atoms, Molecules and Ions. This formula can be used if you calculate the number of moles if they show you the number of particles you have and the Avogadro Constant.
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    (Original post by FluffyCherry)
    Is it 6.0 x 10^23 x 3? So 1.8 x 10^24
    Exactly. In one molecule of CO2, there is an atom of carbon and 2 atoms of oxygen. In one mole of CO2 gas, there are 6.0 x 10^23 molecules, so 1.8 x 10^24 atoms.
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    (Original post by SeanFM)
    In any substance 1 mol has 6x10^23 'lots' of it, when it's a single element like Carbon it's just the number of atoms.

    But here we're dealing with 1 mol of CO2, so there are 6x10^23 molecules of CO2 in 1 mol, so using a formula very similar to the one you suggested in the first place, how many atoms are there if CO2 has three atoms per molecule?
    I finally understood!!! Thanks a bunch!!
    (Original post by StudyMatters)
    I agree. For every one molecule of carbon dioxide, there are 3 atoms.

    Therefore, 6x10^23 molecules x 3, you get 1.8x10^24 atoms. Answer is D.

    The formula of Number of moles=
    Number of particles you have / Number of particles in a mole
    is not necessary. The question revolves around your understanding of Atoms, Molecules and Ions. This formula can be used if you calculate the number of moles if they show you the number of particles you have and the Avogadro Constant.
    I was slightly confused to why I had to use the formula at first but after what you said it all made sense. Thanks a bunch!
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    there are three atoms in every molecule of CO2, 1 carbon 2 oxygen
    in 1 mol of CO2 there are 6*10^23 molecules of CO2 so there will be 3*6*10^23 atoms which is 18*10^23 which is 1.8*10^24.
 
 
 
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