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@Math12345 do you think it's possible for India to emulate Don Bradman's Australia and win the series 3-2?
Reply 7981
In England, since the start of the Ashes summer of 2015, if the opponent has made 300 or more in the first innings of the match, England have averaged just 220 in response; when England have batted first and made 300-plus themselves, the opponents have averaged 263 in reply. To further illustrate, England have not lost at home when holding a first-innings lead since the 2014 India Test at Lord's. (For what it is worth, England have not lost a Test at home when they have held the first-innings lead after batting first, since the concession of their 22-run advantage over West Indies at The Oval in 1988!)
Original post by will_the_latic
@Math12345 do you think it's possible for India to emulate Don Bradman's Australia and win the series 3-2?


Depends on the toss and weather I guess. But I would be happy with another win (even if we lose 3-2 overall)
Original post by Math12345
Depends on the toss and weather I guess. But I would be happy with another win (even if we lose 3-2 overall)

Mm tbf you've already achieved more than we did when we last played in India. Nice to see Kohli dedicate the victory to the Kerala flood victims as well. Nice touch eh?
(edited 5 years ago)
Reply 7984
Following Mike Hesson's decision to step down with a year left on his contract as New Zealand coach, the job has been handed to Gary Stead, the former New Zealand batsman, whose most recent role has been coach of Canterbury. NZ’s Test team is in pretty solid shape. In the last home season, they won three matches out of four - including a first series win over England at home since in 34 years - and, since 2011, only South Africa and Australia have beaten them in series on their soil. But there is always work to be done, and Stead's first challenge will come overseas against Pakistan in the UAE (the squad for which was picked by Hesson before he left). Raval's encouraging start as an opener hit a blip against England with scores of 3, 5 and 17, while in the UAE, the balance of the side will pose some questions if they want to field two spinners. Slightly longer-term, Stead's two-year contract includes an away series in Australia - and a rare Boxing Day Test - alsongside home series against India and England, all in a bumper 2019-2020 season. A hat-trick of success in those series, or even two out of three, would define this generation of New Zealand Test cricketers.


While some sides have gone down the split-captaincy route, New Zealand have stuck with one man. Kane Williamson has a lot on his plate as skipper in all three formats and as a batsman with a huge weight on his shoulders. His numbers as captain are up in both Tests (average 54 v 49) and ODIs (49 v 45) but a little down in T20s (30 v 32). It is the shortest format which provokes the debate when Williamson's workload comes up, although his IPL success shows he remains a top-quality T20 batsman when at his best. He has occasionally been rested from ODIs and T20Is, but with the World Cup (2019) and World T20 (2020) to build for, Stead may be reluctant to do that too often.

Stead's initial contract is for two years but, you would imagine, he would like the job longer than that. Any coach in a position for a decent length of time is likely to oversee some significant change of personnel. Hesson was central to the captaincy upheaval between Ross Taylor and Brendon McCullum and then had to guide the leadership change from McCullum to Williamson. Stead may not have anything that dramatic, but is likely to see Taylor, at least, bring his career to a close, which will create a significant hole in the batting. He will need to keep a close eye on what is coming through the set-up below - he will have a strong idea now given his lengthy spell as a domestic coach - and although not directly part of his role, the expanded New Zealand A system will be crucial.

All I can say is, wow!
Reply 7986
South Africa are certain about two-thirds of their 2019 World Cup squad after their series win in Sri Lanka, according to coach Ottis Gibson, who hopes to have his tournament template ready by the home summer. The main questions appear to be in the bowling department, where South Africa seem spoilt for choice having rested several of their experienced players on the tour. Kagiso Rabada, Lungi Ngidi, Andile Phehlukwayo, Junior Dala, Wiaan Mulder, Tabraiz Shamsi and Keshav Maharaj did duty in Sri Lanka, and have 112 caps between them, less than half of Dale Steyn, Imran Tahir and Chris Morris' combined tally of 235 matches. All ten of them are unlikely to find spots in the World Cup squad, which leaves Gibson and the selectors with decisions to make over the coming matches - South Africa play Zimbabwe and Australia - before entering the final 10 fixtures against Pakistan and Sri Lanka ahead of the World Cup.

In the batting department, South Africa are more settled. Hashim Amla, Quinton de Kock, Faf du Plessis, JP Duminy and David Miller are likely to make up five of the top six. Miller's place, despite three scores of under 25 in the four matches he played in addition to sitting out the last ODI in Sri Lanka, is all but guaranteed. The No.3 spot, though, remains up for grabs because Aiden Markram has struggled. Reeza Hendricks made a strong claim with a century on debut but South Africa may still look elsewhere. South Africa's next assignment is three ODIs and three T20s against Zimbabwe at home at the end of September, before a short white-ball tour to Australia in November
Here’s a little prediction for next year’s World Cup:

England to play NZ in the final and win.
Reply 7988
So, Ishant. Even though he didn't take wickets as often as the captain and the fans expected, he provided the control and predictability that a captain always wants, and that's why there haven't been too many breaks in his Test career. He has always been the workhorse an Indian captain looks for, especially overseas. There are a number of similarities between Ishant and Stuart Broad. Both are tall, hit the deck hard, and are predominantly seam (not swing) bowlers. Ideally both of them should have similar figures in countries with conditions helpful to seam bowling, but that's not the case. Broad has taken more wickets at both a better strike rate (55.4 to Ishant's 71) and average (27.8 to Ishant's 41.1). Even if we were to discount the fact that playing more than half his cricket in England will have helped Broad's confidence, the difference in the effectiveness of both bowlers has been stark. So what is it that Broad does that Ishant isn't or wasn't doing?

The key to Broad's success is his ability to roll his fingers over the ball just about enough to make it move laterally away from the right-hand batsman after pitching. The control with which he can bowl legcutters allowed him to bowl fuller, and also he bowls in the channel that makes batsmen poke at it. On the other hand, Ishant would mainly bring the ball back in after pitching, with the odd ball straightening occasionally - and since that didn't happen at will, it wasn't possible for him to use the incoming deliveries to set up the caught-behind dismissals. The problem with bowling a lot of legcutters is the lack of control over the genuine inswinging delivery, because the muscle memory of wrist and fingers doesn't allow the ball to be delivered with the seam bolt upright. Broad had his issues with this and Ishant too went through an extended phase where, no matter how hard he tried, the ball simply wouldn't come out of his hand with the seam upright. So much so that in some ODIs, he bowled only cross-seam stuff.

Versus Afghanistan, Ishant started bowling a lot fuller. Earlier, the bounce he generated made him look a lot better than he was actually bowling, because the batsmen would either leave or get beaten, and the keeper would collect the ball with his gloves pointing upwards. While that looks pretty on TV screens, it's not effective enough to take wickets. By bowling fuller and swinging the ball in the air, Ishant not only made batsmen look for the deviation but also got lbw and bowled dismissals into play. He also had a leg-side catching trap against Afghanistan: a short midwicket and a catching fielder just behind square, which spoke of the hard yards he had put in on the county circuit. He seems more aware of what he was doing and the possible outcomes. In the current series in England, about 20% of his deliveries have been full, compared to only 8% in the 2014 series. Batsmen can no longer leave his deliveries on length, for significantly more balls are finishing within the line of the stumps.
Reply 7989
Ishant’s gone under the radar for the last few years now.
Anyone remember Cook's first wicket in Tests, getting Ishant out? Ishant's removed him 11 times in Tests so was nice for him to get some payback! They should get him on to bowl at Ashwin next!
Original post by will_the_latic
Anyone remember Cook's first wicket in Tests, getting Ishant out? Ishant's removed him 11 times in Tests so was nice for him to get some payback! They should get him on to bowl at Ashwin next!


Yh he can bowl at Ashwin when India are 500-5
Original post by Math12345
Yh he can bowl at Ashwin when India are 500-5

Didn't know Cook had started playing for Zimbabwe. 'Cos that's the only side you're gonna get 500-5 against 😉
Original post by will_the_latic
Didn't know Cook had started playing for Zimbabwe. 'Cos that's the only side you're gonna get 500-5 against 😉


http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/10732/scorecard/1034817/india-vs-england-5th-test-england-tour-of-india-2016-17
Reply 7994
Kohli is a rarity in world sport: not simply a genius but a symbol, a concept and a way of life. But he is not infallible, and so far in this series has not led as well as he might. For the first Test, India preferred the swashbuckle of Shikhar Dhawan to the solidity of Cheteshwar Pujara and opted for only one spinner; then, for the second, they selected two spinners despite conditions imploring them not to, an error they compounded by gambling on Kuldeep Yadav even though Ravindra Jadeja has previously done well at Lord’s with both bat and ball. Of course, all this is a factor of the bristling aggression and relentless positivity that make Kohli so brilliant, but in the context these decisions were misjudged. If India are to save themselves, he must now get everything right.

For someone who's username is 'Math', you seem to talk an awful lot about history.

Anyway that pitch was a road. Dawson and Rashid 112 run partnership and Karun Nair 303* tells you all you need to know.

Even Cook and Jennings put on 103.
(edited 5 years ago)
Reply 7997
Ball has been ruled out for the remainder of the season due to a back problem. He picked up the problem in the T20 Blast against Derbyshire at the beginning of August and has not been able to play since. Nottinghamshire face Somerset in the final T20 Blast quarter-final on Sunday and are currently third in Division One of the County Championship. Ball had taken 28 Championship wickets at 22.25 in six matches, but had only managed three wickets in six T20 matches at an economy of 9.26. Ball featured occasionally for England during the 2018 season, playing the final ODI against Australia at Old Trafford - where he held his nerve with the bat to allow Jos Buttler to secure a one-wicket win - and was also part of two of the T20Is against India.
Original post by will_the_latic
Anyway that pitch was a road. Dawson and Rashid 112 run partnership and Karun Nair 303* tells you all you need to know.

Even Cook and Jennings put on 103.


You said:
Didn't know Cook had started playing for Zimbabwe. 'Cos that's the only side you're gonna get 500-5 against

Don't start commenting on the pitch now.

And currently India are more successful than England in World Cups, and are currently number 1 in tests.
Original post by Math12345
You said:
Didn't know Cook had started playing for Zimbabwe. 'Cos that's the only side you're gonna get 500-5 against

Don't start commenting on the pitch now.

And currently India are more successful than England in World Cups, and are currently number 1 in tests.

Exactly. That's the only side you are going to get 500-5 against. As in, now. Not in 2016.

Because you've only played matches at home until now 😏

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