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    (Original post by blakevanderbilt)
    I am currently going to school in the US, my major is math and economics and it has always been my dream to study in the oldest university in the anglosphere. Just being a part of that history is enough for me to die without regrets. No matter what anybody else thinks and regardless of rankings, I always held Oxford as the best university in the world. Having that said, I don't have the best of grades, but I have a GPA above 3.5. I know it will be difficult to apply to Oxford because well, it's Oxford am I right? But I'm sure that there are unspoken advantages that one student may have over another and I'm here to rectify some of my beliefs about the system. I will be applying without funding, which might seem odd at first, but since my parents are able and willing to pay for it, I hope that puts me in a better position to be accepted. I mean, how easy it is for Oxford to overlook mediocre grades in favour of a potential self-funded student? Unlike their undergraduate school, Oxford does not have a legal limit as to how many students they can accept for their graduate school, so it seems fairly logical that a self-funded Master's student is easy-money. Reputation and integrity aside, if one were to apply to a taught Masters in Oxford with a GPA around a 3.5 without a need for funding, how goes his chances?
    This isn't how things work in the UK. Unlike the US, all universities here are what you call "Need Blind". You do not provide any information about how much you earn or have until you recieve an offer from the university. This offer will have several conditions on it, some academic, and some financial. if and only if you do receive a conditional offer, you are then free to 1) Apply for funding from the university or elsewhere or 2) Not apply for funding and chose to pay everything on your own. So to answer your question, No, paying for your university from your funds is NOT an advantage for you over any other applicant. This is taken from Oxford's Website:

    "As a condition of your offer, your college will require you to provide evidence of your ability to cover your University and college fees for the first year of the course. The college will also ask you to sign a declaration confirming your ability to meet all living costs in addition to the fees for subsequent years of the course (if longer than one year). Your college’s offer letter will explain what documentation you need to send them."


    Also, understand that Entry to Most universities in the UK (Including Cambridge and Oxford) are mainly academic based, unlike the US where you have to at least show some extracurricular activities even in graduate level entry.

    Finally, just a piece of advice; choosing a university such as Oxford solely for its history is a really bad idea. The courses are extremely rigorous and hard (Especially maths) and believe me, if you ever feel like quitting from the pressure, the "history" of the university isn't what is going to stop you from doing so.

    P.S: GPA isn't the only factor that universities judge you on especially in Postgraduate studies. There are many other factors such as interviews, sample work, etc

    Good luck!
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    I got rejected for undergrad studies there despite having near perfect grades, extra curriculars etc - so I''ll try to not let my bitterness prevent mefrom being objective about you're chances lol.

    I'm no expert, but if you're planning on doing a postgraduate course in something maths/econ related, it's incredibly competitive. Oxford won't be short of people with very high marks in their degrees who can also self-fund. So no, I don't think you being able to self-fund is going to put you at any advantage. Besides, Oxford admit people based upon merit and the perceived talent of the candidate (they aren't desperate for money, they have plenty of funding - admitting lot's of students reduces the courses prestige/exclusivity). I'm not saying you have no chance, but it will certainly be v.difficult for you with you're GPA.


    If you get rejected, you could always do a masters at another institution, and if you do really well, apply to do a PhD at Oxford - this way you'll be spending three years in Oxford's vibrant atmosphere as opposed to just one.Also, I really don't think you should place the brand name of a university as the deciding factor as to whether you want to study there.Both my parents and grandparents went to Oxford uni and I grew up in Oxford - it's a nice place to live and an excellent institution to study at,but what it's actually like to study there is dramatized massively - I mean you only have to interact with the students for this to become obvious.

    Take into consideration the field you want to specialize in and if there are suitable lecturers who will be well-equipped to supervise you. For someone who wants to specialize in microeconomics for example, they would be daft to choose Oxford over a place like UCL - which is the best institution in the world for that particular sub-discipline. I hope you get my jist. Good luck!
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    Of course Oxford isn't easy to get into. Duh!
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    (Original post by EdCohen)
    I got rejected for undergrad studies there despite having near perfect grades, extra curriculars etc - so I''ll try to not let my bitterness prevent mefrom being objective about you're chances lol.

    I'm no expert, but if you're planning on doing a postgraduate course in something maths/econ related, it's incredibly competitive. Oxford won't be short of people with very high marks in their degrees who can also self-fund. So no, I don't think you being able to self-fund is going to put you at any advantage. Besides, Oxford admit people based upon merit and the perceived talent of the candidate (they aren't desperate for money, they have plenty of funding - admitting lot's of students reduces the courses prestige/exclusivity). I'm not saying you have no chance, but it will certainly be v.difficult for you with you're GPA.


    If you get rejected, you could always do a masters at another institution, and if you do really well, apply to do a PhD at Oxford - this way you'll be spending three years in Oxford's vibrant atmosphere as opposed to just one.Also, I really don't think you should place the brand name of a university as the deciding factor as to whether you want to study there.Both my parents and grandparents went to Oxford uni and I grew up in Oxford - it's a nice place to live and an excellent institution to study at,but what it's actually like to study there is dramatized massively - I mean you only have to interact with the students for this to become obvious.

    Take into consideration the field you want to specialize in and if there are suitable lecturers who will be well-equipped to supervise you. For someone who wants to specialize in microeconomics for example, they would be daft to choose Oxford over a place like UCL - which is the best institution in the world for that particular sub-discipline. I hope you get my jist. Good luck!
    *DPhil
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    *DPhil
    lol
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    - You don't get an offer easier just because you can fund yourself
    - 3.5 is good enough but that's the minimum requirement for most courses, equivalent only to a 2:1 - many courses ask for a first
    - professional and research experience will help
    - Just because they can accept an unlimited amount of students theoretically doesn't mean they would, ever if they don't care about their reputation. They need to keep dropout and failure rates low, and progression rates high. This means they cannot accept anyone who they think isn't going to be good enough academically for a potential doctorate in the future, likely for the year after. They also need to have the physical space and the staff to teach and house the students. This is not an online distance learning institution.
    - based only on acceptance rates, graduate admission and undergraduate admission are similarly competitive, with taught masters being way more competitive than research masters, and doctorates being slightly more competitive than taught masters usually (but the most competitive courses are MBA, BCL, and another master's I don't remember). But acceptance rates tell only half the story at most.
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    (Original post by N-R-G)
    Of course Oxford isn't easy to get into. Duh!
    It depends on the course.

    (Original post by blakevanderbilt)
    X
    What do you want to study?
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    (Original post by Josb)
    lol
    why do you follow me everywhere are you dtf
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    why do you follow me everywhere are you dtf
    I can see the "latest discussions" too.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    It depends on the course.
    I would have thought every course is difficult to get onto. Name a course that isn't?
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    (Original post by N-R-G)
    I would have thought every course is difficult to get onto. Name a course that isn't?
    Non-certificate day schools courses at the Department for Continuing Education.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    I can see the "latest discussions" too.
    avoiding my question i see
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    This is what you get for asking such a general and vague question. What is hard? What is easy?

    Also, what I have down there is my business.
    Not when everyone can see it all over the place.
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    (Original post by N-R-G)
    I would have thought every course is difficult to get onto. Name a course that isn't?
    The MSt in Jewish Studies in the Graeco-Roman Period.
    http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/gradu...o-roman-period

    MPhil in Tibetan and Himalayan Studies
    http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/gradu...alayan-studies

    As long as you have the requirements, you'll be accepted. There is no competition; many Humanities courses are in the same situation.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    The MSt in Jewish Studies in the Graeco-Roman Period.
    http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/gradu...o-roman-period

    MPhil in Tibetan and Himalayan Studies
    http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/gradu...alayan-studies

    As long as you have the requirements, you'll be accepted. There is no competition; many Humanities courses are in the same situation.
    Well I suppose it's all relative but for me getting the grades would be impossible. If 3.5 is equivalent to a 2.1 then he doesn't stand that much chance really.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    The MSt in Jewish Studies in the Graeco-Roman Period.
    http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/gradu...o-roman-period

    MPhil in Tibetan and Himalayan Studies
    http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/gradu...alayan-studies

    As long as you have the requirements, you'll be accepted. There is no competition; many Humanities courses are in the same situation.
    I wouldn't really call a high 2:1 plus being able to speak Hebrew as 'easy'. This is assuming that they'd take people in ever if their academic references said they're **** and they submit work samples that are 'University of Oxford' repeated 100 times.
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    I wouldn't really call a high 2:1 plus being able to speak Hebrew as 'easy'. This is assuming that they'd take people in ever if their academic references said they're **** and they submit work samples that are 'University of Oxford' repeated 100 times.
    By 'easy', I mean that you won't be rejected if you meet the requirements. For other courses, even applicants with better grades than required are not successful. Obviously, no Oxford course will ask for 2:2 with no reference.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    By 'easy', I mean that you won't be rejected if you meet the requirements. For other courses, even applicants with better grades than required are not successful. Obviously, no Oxford course will ask for 2:2 with no reference.
    Uhm I think you might get rejected.
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    (Original post by blakevanderbilt)
    I am currently going to school in the US, my major is math and economics and it has always been my dream to study in the oldest university in the anglosphere. Just being a part of that history is enough for me to die without regrets. No matter what anybody else thinks and regardless of rankings, I always held Oxford as the best university in the world. Having that said, I don't have the best of grades, but I have a GPA above 3.5. I know it will be difficult to apply to Oxford because well, it's Oxford am I right? But I'm sure that there are unspoken advantages that one student may have over another and I'm here to rectify some of my beliefs about the system. I will be applying without funding, which might seem odd at first, but since my parents are able and willing to pay for it, I hope that puts me in a better position to be accepted. I mean, how easy it is for Oxford to overlook mediocre grades in favour of a potential self-funded student? Unlike their undergraduate school, Oxford does not have a legal limit as to how many students they can accept for their graduate school, so it seems fairly logical that a self-funded Master's student is easy-money. Reputation and integrity aside, if one were to apply to a taught Masters in Oxford with a GPA around a 3.5 without a need for funding, how goes his chances?
    Oxford admissions are based purely on academic merit and potential. Being able to self-fund won't give you any advantage; Oxford isn't exactly short on cash so they can afford to take a less well-off student who won't quit halfway through over somebody who doesn't require financial assistance who will.

    Besides, it's in their interest to take the best. Many people who attend Oxford later go on to become very successful in their field and share some of their success with the university by a) giving Oxford another prominent alumnus, thereby helping it maintain its reputation for excellence and b) making donations to their alma mater. In the long run, this strategy is of far greater benefit to the university than saving a couple thousand pounds by taking somebody of lower merit.

    As others have said, it's really not a great idea to apply to Oxford just because it's the oldest university in the English-speaking world. Your question makes one assumption that effectively destroys the usefulness of any answer you might receive: you say 'reputation and integrity aside.' The admissions people very much have reputation and integrity in mind when looking at who to admit; they won't just admit ridiculous numbers of people just for easy money. To do so is to lower their own prestige because then certain postgraduate programmes would develop a reputation for being an easy way to add an Oxford degree to one's CV (resume in American ). There's no point asking what your chances are 'reputation and integrity aside.'

    On an unrelated note, most universities in the UK aren't like universities in the United States in terms of having separate undergraduate and graduate 'schools.' They're singular institutions that award both undergraduate and graduate degrees. The closest thing you have to a split system at Oxford is the collegiate system and that's still not an undergraduate/graduate split.
 
 
 
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