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#1
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#1
If in an english maths text book it says...."this is called the chain rule"....do they mean that thing is called the chain rule in the english language, but in other languages they may call it something else?
If so, why don't they write..."this is called the chain rule in english". Doesn't that make more sense?
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#2
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markovchain17
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#3
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If it's in an english maths text book, it need not to specifiy that's it's called that only in english
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#4
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(Original post by eternaforest)
If it's in an english maths text book, it need not to specifiy that's it's called that in english
So we assume they are telling us the english name for that thing?
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markovchain17
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(Original post by adsads)
So we assume they are telling us the english name for that thing?
Yes, it be a bit weird if in books if it was always like "this is what is called a dog (in english) and this is what's called a cat (in english)"
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#6
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(Original post by eternaforest)
Yes, it be a bit weird if in books if it was always like "this is what is called a dog (in english) and this is what's called a cat (in english)"
So then the book will make no attempt to tell us what these things are called in any other language?

Doesn't this change your knowledge in a way (not conceptually obviously), but linguistically at least. This is because you only know what all these new things you have been taught about are called in english.
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markovchain17
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(Original post by adsads)
So then the book will make no attempt to tell us what these things are called in any other language?

Doesn't this change your knowledge in a way (not conceptually obviously), but linguistically at least. This is because you only know what all these new things you have been taught about are called in english.
If you're reading an english text book, it is already assumed by the author that you speak english, It doesn't 'change' knowledge at all. If you're learning a new word and what it means you are adding to knowledge. If you were to then learn that word in another language as well, you'd be adding knowledge (linguistically since you already know what the word means from having learnt it in english)
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#8
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(Original post by eternaforest)
If you're reading an english text book, it is already assumed by the author that you speak english, It doesn't 'change' knowledge at all. If you're learning a new word and what it means you are adding to knowledge. If you were to then learn that word in another language as well, you'd be adding knowledge (linguistically since you already know what the word means from having learnt it in english)
So in an english maths textbook they are only telling you what new things are called in english and also that most likely these new things have a different name in other languages? So you can't assume the name of the thing is chain rule in all languages?
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Plagioclase
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(Original post by adsads)
So then the book will make no attempt to tell us what these things are called in any other language?

Doesn't this change your knowledge in a way (not conceptually obviously), but linguistically at least. This is because you only know what all these new things you have been taught about are called in english.
Why would a maths textbook include translations for other languages? The point of a maths textbook is to teach you maths, not to teach you vocabulary in the case that you end up needing to communicate maths in a different language...

And I don't understand how knowing that the chain rule is called Kettenregel in German changes my conceptual understanding of it.
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#10
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(Original post by Plagioclase)
Why would a maths textbook include translations for other languages? The point of a maths textbook is to teach you maths, not to teach you vocabulary in the case that you end up needing to communicate maths in a different language...

And I don't understand how knowing that the chain rule is called Kettenregel in German changes my conceptual understanding of it.
I agree the purpose of the english maths textbook is to teach you concepts, however at the same time they also teach you what these new concepts are called in english. So surely this changes your knowledge, compared to learning from a german maths textbook. You would know the same concepts, but only know what those concepts are called in either german or english, unless you went and learnt translations.
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markovchain17
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#11
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(Original post by adsads)
So in an english maths textbook they are only telling you what new things are called in english and also that most likely these new things have a different name in other languages? So you can't assume the name of the thing is chain rule in all languages?
I think 99.9999% of people have the common sense to know that when a learning a word it isn't going to be the same in all languages. It can be the same in some languages because of etymologies and the roots of the word but just to make this clear to you: words you learn in a language are 90% of the time only gonna be spelt and said that way in that language.
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Plagioclase
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#12
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(Original post by adsads)
I agree the purpose of the english maths textbook is to teach you concepts, however at the same time they also teach you what these new concepts are called in english. So surely this changes your knowledge, compared to learning from a german maths textbook. You would know the same concepts, but only know what those concepts are called in either german or english, unless you went and learnt translations.
Knowing what people in different countries call concepts doesn't have anything to do with how you understand that concept. If you need to know what something's called in a different language then that's fine, but that's languages, not Maths. Knowing what to call mathematical concepts in another language does not improve my mathematical ability.
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#13
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(Original post by eternaforest)
I think 99.9999% of people have the common sense to know that when a learning a word it isn't going to be the same in all languages. It can be the same in some languages because of etymologies and the roots of the word but just to make this clear to you: words you learn in a language are 90% of the time only gonna be spelt and said that way in that language.
But then why doesn't it make sense to say...

"this is called the chain rule in english"

Because its true, that thing is called a chain rule in english. Isn't writing...."this is called the chain rule" vague and need assumptions?
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markovchain17
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(Original post by adsads)
But then why doesn't it make sense to say...

"this is called the chain rule in english"

Because its true, that thing is called a chain rule in english. Isn't writing...."this is called the chain rule" vague and need assumptions?
It makes sense to say "this is called the chain rule in english" but it is unnecessary to say that it's only called that in english.
Why is only saying "this is called chain rule" vague?
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the bear
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#15
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didn't OP make similar posts last year..." what is this called ***picture of pencil***" etc ?
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H.A.
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#16
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I get your point but I believe that say, you use and name the chain rule in English in a mathematical proof or a physics paper, even someone who doesn't know it's called the chain rule in English would see what you did there, if they know the concept, whether they call it the chain rule in their head or kettenregel. It's the concepts that are important, linguistic problems can be overcome through intuition like in my example or if it's more complicated, there are always people with understanding of both languages to form the bridge between them. Maths is like it's own language
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#17
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(Original post by eternaforest)
It makes sense to say "this is called the chain rule in english" but it is unnecessary to say that it's only called that in english.
Why is only saying "this is called chain rule" vague?
Because when you say "this is called the chain rule", you are assuming that either....

1) every language in the world calls it a "chain rule"
2) there is only one language in the world



Unless you take "this is called the chain rule" to mean "this is called the chain rule in english". Then it makes sense.
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TheOtherSide.
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#18
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(Original post by adsads)
But then why doesn't it make sense to say...

"this is called the chain rule in english"

Because its true, that thing is called a chain rule in english. Isn't writing...."this is called the chain rule" vague and need assumptions?
It really isn't vague, especially since this is a maths textbook.
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ihatePE
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#19
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just revise and get it over with
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#20
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(Original post by BlueBlueBells)
It really isn't vague, especially since this is a maths textbook.
How? You are ASSUMING they are referring to the english name. Therefore there is vagueness there.
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