Article: Should euthanasia be legalised? Watch

Pickles
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According to Debate.org 72 percent of people believe that euthanasia should be be legalised, but would it really be the right thing to do?

Read more here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...a-be-legalised
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troubadour.
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(Original post by Pickles)
Would it really be the right thing to do?
Yes.
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BefuddledPenguin
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I watched my grandma's mind being taken from her by disease. If I had a terminal illness I'd want to die as myself, not whichever stranger my disease turned me into.
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paul514
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(Original post by Pickles)
According to Debate.org 72 percent of people believe that euthanasia should be be legalised, but would it really be the right thing to do?

Read more here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...a-be-legalised
No, not because it isn't the right thing to do but we don't have reliable psychological tests at the moment to test them for being of sound mind near the point of when they want to end their life.

We don't have a system of how to do it and society is very split on the issue so it requires a big debate


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Tiger Rag
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If you legalise it, it's going to get tricky. How do you prove whether someone really wanted to die? You can't.
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PQ
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(Original post by BefuddledPenguin)
I watched my grandma's mind being taken from her by disease. If I had a terminal illness I'd want to die as myself, not whichever stranger my disease turned me into.
Have you made out an advance directive along those lines: http://compassionindying.org.uk/maki...use-treatment/

It's very simple and means your wishes are clear to doctors and loved ones
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PQ
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(Original post by Pickles)
According to Debate.org 72 percent of people believe that euthanasia should be be legalised, but would it really be the right thing to do?

Read more here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...a-be-legalised
(Original post by Hydeman)
Yes.
(Original post by BefuddledPenguin)
I watched my grandma's mind being taken from her by disease. If I had a terminal illness I'd want to die as myself, not whichever stranger my disease turned me into.
You do realise that euthanasia is not assisted suicide?

Euthanasia is the right for medical professionals or other people to end a life regardless of the patient's wishes.
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Euthana...roduction.aspx

It's the reasoning Harold Shipman used to justify his murders.
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troubadour.
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(Original post by PQ)
You do realise that euthanasia is not assisted suicide?

Euthanasia is the right for medical professionals or other people to end a life regardless of the patient's wishes.
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Euthana...roduction.aspx

It's the reasoning Harold Shipman used to justify his murders.
My bad -- wasn't aware of the proper definition. 'Yes' to assisted suicide, OP, which is what I think you meant in the first place.
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WayneEnterprises
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(Original post by PQ)
You do realise that euthanasia is not assisted suicide?

Euthanasia is the right for medical professionals or other people to end a life regardless of the patient's wishes.
http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Euthana...roduction.aspx

It's the reasoning Harold Shipman used to justify his murders.
That's only involuntary euthanasia. Voluntary euthanasia is when the patient gives consent. Non voluntary euthanasia is when the patient is unable to give consent. Then you've got passive euthanasia which is withholding treatment that would otherwise prolong their life, and finally active euthanasia which is ending someones life through practical action (suffocate, poison etc)
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Aj12
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(Original post by OU Student)
If you legalise it, it's going to get tricky. How do you prove whether someone really wanted to die? You can't.
We tend to have a fairly good grasp on whether or not someone is mentally fit to make a decision. We allow patients to refuse treatments that would prolong their lives and create DNR orders. If they are mentally fit enough to make a decision like stopping any further treatment, then surely they are fit enough to make one around whether they want to live or not?

The safeguards that were proposed for the UK seemed robust. Two doctors had to agree with a judge (I think) making the final call. Any sign of wavering on the person and the process was stopped and went back to square one. The process could be stopped at any time by any one involved in it if they had any doubts.
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Howard
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(Original post by paul514)
No, not because it isn't the right thing to do but we don't have reliable psychological tests at the moment to test them for being of sound mind near the point of when they want to end their life.

We don't have a system of how to do it and society is very split on the issue so it requires a big debate


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Society isn't very split on the issue. As the OP states, 73% of people are in favor of it.

If I had terminal cancer I might decide to end my life prematurely. I don't think I should be forced to run a gambit of psychological tests to see if I am sound mind.

The decision when to die should be just another life decision as far as I am concerned - do I buy or rent, become a doctor or join the army, get married or stay single? This doesn't or shouldn't be, in my view, a decision left to a collective.
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paul514
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(Original post by Howard)
Society isn't very split on the issue. As the OP states, 73% of people are in favor of it.

If I had terminal cancer I might decide to end my life prematurely. I don't think I should be forced to run a gambit of psychological tests to see if I am sound mind.

The decision when to die should be just another life decision as far as I am concerned - do I buy or rent, become a doctor or join the army, get married or stay single? This doesn't or shouldn't be, in my view, a decision left to a collective.
That's a very simplistic way of looking at it. I also support the idea of euthanasia but it can't be done until the things I mentioned are settled.


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Howard
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(Original post by paul514)
That's a very simplistic way of looking at it. I also support the idea of euthanasia but it can't be done until the things I mentioned are settled.


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It is indeed a simplistic approach. But I think it's a simple issue. Should a person have the right to choose when they die or not? I think they should. The sound "mind argument" certainly comes into it on some occasions but in many cases a terminally ill person is obviously capable of making a rationale decision without soundness of mind coming into it.

Plus, contrary to your claims, society isn't very split on this at all - if the OP is correct (I admit that I haven't checked) then 73% of people support it and presumably, like me, don't find it a particularly complicated issue.
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sleepysnooze
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(Original post by OU Student)
If you legalise it, it's going to get tricky. How do you prove whether someone really wanted to die? You can't.
rational legal procedures, perhaps?
for example: if somebody goes to a hospital and says "I want to die, but I don't have the ability or preference to take my own life by myself, so I wish to have a lethal injection, because *insert justification here*"
the NHS could interview them and consider their background, such as pain, depression, etc. they could also consider whether they are going to leave behind vulnerable people, or whether their bad situation is permanent/terminal. this could be taken to a review panel and then, if this panel agrees that this person "really" wants to die (based on what somebody reasonable in their position would also be thinking, but NOT based on the preference/ideals of the panel itself because they would have to be neutral and deferential in most senses to a free adult human being choosing to die), then they'd take an application to a judge/court where they'd give them legal permission to begin the euthanasia procedure if everything checks out

it's like saying "having a government is going to be tricky because how do we know if the government is going to do what we want with our tax money or whether it is going to not become a dictatorship?" and forgetting that institutions/checks are perfectly possible (e.g. constitutional separations of powers, and elections).
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