whats the difference between gastro-oesophageal reflux and acid-related dyspepsia

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asaaal
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sorry stupid question !
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Beska
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(Original post by asaaal)
sorry stupid question !
Reflux is the actual movement of acid through the lower oesophageal sphincter into the oesophagus, which causes irritation there. Acid-related dyspepsia however is pain and discomfort in the stomach (or more correctly the epigastrium) as a consequence of too much acid and/or not enough protection from acid within the stomach itself - it does not relate to the oesophagus or to reflux. They are similar but distinct things, and commonly can occur together.
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thegodofgod
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(Original post by asaaal)
sorry stupid question !
To add to the above, the main aim of treatment for GORD is to use a raft-forming agent (salts of alginic acid, usually sodium alginate), which forms a barrier above the acid and helps to push it down back into the stomach. The main treatment for dyspepsia is antacids (usually calcium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate), which aim to neutralise any excess acid.
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Helenia
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(Original post by thegodofgod)
To add to the above, the main aim of treatment for GORD is to use a raft-forming agent (salts of alginic acid, usually sodium alginate), which forms a barrier above the acid and helps to push it down back into the stomach. The main treatment for dyspepsia is antacids (usually calcium carbonate or sodium bicarbonate), which aim to neutralise any excess acid.
I'm not a GP or gastroenterologist, but haven't PPIs/H2 antagonists replaced both of the above for many patients? The only time I use a pure antacid is sodium citrate immediately before emergency C-section.
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thegodofgod
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(Original post by Helenia)
I'm not a GP or gastroenterologist, but haven't PPIs/H2 antagonists replaced both of the above for many patients? The only time I use a pure antacid is sodium citrate immediately before emergency C-section.
Yeah, that's true, although I was thinking of it more from a minor ailments perspective, i.e. what you would do if a patient presented with said complaints for the first time in a community pharmacy setting. I think H2 antagonists and PPIs (and PPIs much more so than H2 antagonists due to efficacy) are usually used for more chronic conditions, over a longer time period.

Having said that, H2 antagonists (Ranitidine, as Zantac) and PPIs (esomeprazole, as Nexium) are both available to buy OTC as P medicines, but they don't tend to be used as they're quite expensive compared to the likes of Gaviscon (simple antacids) / Gaviscon Advance (with sodium alginate).
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asaaal
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(Original post by thegodofgod)
Yeah, that's true, although I was thinking of it more from a minor ailments perspective, i.e. what you would do if a patient presented with said complaints for the first time in a community pharmacy setting. I think H2 antagonists and PPIs (and PPIs much more so than H2 antagonists due to efficacy) are usually used for more chronic conditions, over a longer time period.

Having said that, H2 antagonists (Ranitidine, as Zantac) and PPIs (esomeprazole, as Nexium) are both available to buy OTC as P medicines, but they don't tend to be used as they're quite expensive compared to the likes of Gaviscon (simple antacids) / Gaviscon Advance (with sodium alginate).
(Original post by Helenia)
I'm not a GP or gastroenterologist, but haven't PPIs/H2 antagonists replaced both of the above for many patients? The only time I use a pure antacid is sodium citrate immediately before emergency C-section.
(Original post by Beska)
Reflux is the actual movement of acid through the lower oesophageal sphincter into the oesophagus, which causes irritation there. Acid-related dyspepsia however is pain and discomfort in the stomach (or more correctly the epigastrium) as a consequence of too much acid and/or not enough protection from acid within the stomach itself - it does not relate to the oesophagus or to reflux. They are similar but distinct things, and commonly can occur together.
Thank you ! i was just wondering why NICE branches off for 'uninvestigated dyspepsia and functional 'dyspepsia' .. what are their differences?
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