Why is violence still more acceptable than sex in the media?

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KingBradly
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When the NoMorePage3 campaign was in full swing, I remember noticing one of the common points people made in the comments writing on the site, as well as one of the points of the manifesto.

It was that Page 3 should go because a child might see it.

I find this attitude very strange. Clearly it's true that kids should be exposed to the fact that various horrors happen in the world. It's good for kids to occasionally see the headlines on BBC news. But The Sun is famous for it's deplorable reporting of tragic events. One only has to look at it's reporting of the Hillsborough Disaster as evidence. The Sun insensitively and callously sensationalizes its news stories by making them particularly lurid and writing them with about as much subtlety as a battering ram.

Clearly The Sun is not particularly suitable for children, and not because of the uncovered member of our own species on the third page.

But this attitude is something that permeates our society. It's fine for a family to sit round and watch a Bond film where people are getting blown away left right and centre, but god forbid one of the bond girls shows a nipple. It's just bizarre.

And I'm not being a prude when it comes to violence. I have no problem with violence in the media. I just think that treating sex as something more harmful than violence and murder is a very dangerous thing.
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caravaggio2
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It could be because in movies and TV 99% of violence, especially graphic gorey violence, is depicted happening to men.
Men in the media, just as often in the real world, are disposable. If just a fraction of the scenes where violence happening to a succession of men in a movie was happening to a succession of women instead, it would never be acceptable, absolutely never.
There is a test that feminists like to use in movies called the Bechdel test. It originated from Allison Bechdel’s comic, “Dykes to Watch Out For” in 1985.
It goes something like this...,Tto pass the test a movie just has to pass these three simple questions:
1 Are there two or more women in it who have names,
2 Do they talk to each other uninterrupted in a scene for more than a couple of minutes
3 Do they talk to each other about something other then a man.
Surprisingly few pass.

It would be interesting if there could be a test that measures the relative percentage of "entertainment violence" dished out to men in each movie.
A measure of the violence and disposability gap as it were
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Goaded
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Idk. I'd rather see sex.
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KingBradly
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(Original post by caravaggio2)
It could be because in movies and TV 99% of violence, especially graphic gorey violence, is depicted happening to men.
Men in the media, just as often in the real world, are disposable. If just a fraction of the scenes where violence happening to a succession of men in a movie was happening to a succession of women instead, it would never be acceptable, absolutely never.
There is a test that feminists like to use in movies called the Bechdel test. It originated from Allison Bechdel’s comic, “Dykes to Watch Out For” in 1985.
It goes something like this...,Tto pass the test a movie just has to pass these three simple questions:
1 Are there two or more women in it who have names,
2 Do they talk to each other uninterrupted in a scene for more than a couple of minutes
3 Do they talk to each other about something other then a man.
Surprisingly few pass.

It would be interesting if there could be a test that measures the relative percentage of "entertainment violence" dished out to men in each movie.
A measure of the violence and disposability gap as it were
I think this raises an interesting point. When I see men being killed in a film or TV show, I generally care less than seeing women being killed. I find violence towards women for more disturbing than violence towards men. Maybe there isn't a problem with this, it's probably just my natural masculine desire to protect women.

But when you look at a film like Straw Dogs, which was criticized for being misogynistic due to the rape scene in it where the main female character's emotions for a moment seem a little ambiguous, and then consider how no one complained about it's utterly devastating portrayal of men as essentially savage beasts at core, people's attitudes certainly seem a bit off kilter. Or when you consider the fact that Lars Van Trier was called misogynistic for Antichrist because it was partly about the "evil of women", and yet no one complained about some of his other films which very much concentrate on the evil of men (or a patriarchal community like in Breaking the Waves), it does seem there is a bias against men.
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