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AQA-A A2 English Literature Unit 4 watch

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    (Original post by press2play)
    By the way, musicman, I'd never thought about Lamia like that, good point, thanks! I suppose you'd use that poem as an example of Keats' attitude to women then, especially the portrayal of Lamia as a serpent. Great, cheers!
    Lol it's OK you're welcome! Serpent could perhaps also link with Hell imagery, showing how she has evil beneath her beautiful exterior, perhaps adding to the femme fatale thing??
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    (Original post by musicman)
    Lol it's OK you're welcome! Serpent could perhaps also link with Hell imagery, showing how she has evil beneath her beautiful exterior, perhaps adding to the femme fatale thing??
    Definitely! And again linking with 'La Belle Dame', the way she is presented as "full beautiful.. a faery's child" but then leaves the Knight "alone and pailely loitering".. the undercutting of pleasure with reality?.. like Lamia!
    Excellent stuff, this is really helping! Cheers, again!
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    Blake Post

    Here are the notes I made about Blake - they are in the form of quote, poem and explanation. It covers quite a bit of context if I remember correctly.

    I was quite lucky as I had a REALLY good teacher for Blake.
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  1. File Type: doc blake quotes.doc (45.5 KB, 1689 views)
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    (Original post by press2play)
    Definitely! And again linking with 'La Belle Dame', the way she is presented as "full beautiful.. a faery's child" but then leaves the Knight "alone and pailely loitering".. the undercutting of pleasure with reality?.. like Lamia!
    Excellent stuff, this is really helping! Cheers, again!
    And then you could link the idea of the arrival of reality to 'Ode to a Nightingale', where he seems to want to escape reality via the nightingale's "viewless wings of poesy" (perhaps the reference to poetry here reveals something about Keats's idea of the role of the poet - should have the ability to take the reader into another realm?), but he ends up being "tolled" away from the Nightingale's world back to reality. Also cf. St. Agnes' Eve, where Porphyro tries to 'penetrate' into his lover Madeline's dream by having sex with her: we discussed some really dodgy imagery in class which shows this such as "he took her hollow lute" which produced "solution sweet", etc etc!! And also, Apollonius represents reality in Lamia with his "eye severe"!
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    can anybody help me with the meaning of Blakes' The tiger ,please!!

    what are the important quotes in the poem?
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    (Original post by ali*117)
    can anybody help me with the meaning of Blakes' The tiger ,please!!

    what are the important quotes in the poem?
    A copy and paste from the document I attached... I hope these are of help.
    (Sorry I spell 'tiger' differently but that's how Blake originally spelt it!)

    ‘What immortal hand or eye could frame thy fearful symmetry?’ – The Tyger, Songs of Experience.
    - Each subsequent stanza of this poem is arguably refining this question. The large amount of questions in the poem makes a huge demand on the reader. The hammering beat of this poem is suggestive of the Blacksmith that is the poem’s central image. These lines also denote a very ‘deliberate’ kind of making; there is no way that the tiger could’ve been accidentally produced.

    ‘In what distant deeps or skies… In what furnace was thy brain?’ – The Tyger, Songs of Experience.
    - This presents the contrast of positive and negative expressions, asserting the difference between innocence and experience.

    ‘Did he smile his work to see?’ – The Tyger, Songs of Experience.
    - The tiger becomes a symbolic character as the poem progresses: it is perfectly beautiful yet perfectly destructive. It becomes representative of the presence of evil in the world.

    ‘Did he who made the lamb make thee?’ – The Tyger, Songs of Experience.
    - Arguably, it is this question that is central to the poem. It references Blake’s poem ‘The Lamb’ in ‘Songs of Innocence,’ and once again presents the contrast between innocence and experience. The lamb’s gentleness and the tiger’s fierceness arguably represent the two contrasting qualities of the human mind.
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    (Original post by Leaby)
    Blake Post

    Here are the notes I made about Blake - they are in the form of quote, poem and explanation. It covers quite a bit of context if I remember correctly.

    I was quite lucky as I had a REALLY good teacher for Blake.
    WOW thanks thats so helpful!!
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    (Original post by press2play)
    Definitely! And again linking with 'La Belle Dame', the way she is presented as "full beautiful.. a faery's child" but then leaves the Knight "alone and pailely loitering".. the undercutting of pleasure with reality?.. like Lamia!
    Excellent stuff, this is really helping! Cheers, again!
    Just remembered a tiny point: talking about Keats's view of women, he personifies melancholy as "she" in his "ode to melancholy", perhaps this also reveals his attitude towards women!! And it's interesting that it's a "he" who ends up one of melancholy's "cloudy trophies" - perhaps this also links to the femme fatale thing?
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    how have you guys been revising for othello? Iv just been learning quotes at the mo but it isn't making me any more confident
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    yeh othello is rather tricky to revise for, i'm just going to make sure i know the play REALLY well as if a question comes up on a particular scene or act, i'd need to know what's in it!

    also musicman and press2play-great stuff you guys are coming out with, i reckon if we just apply all this in the exam, we'll all do fine!
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    (Original post by musicman)
    Just remembered a tiny point: talking about Keats's view of women, he personifies melancholy as "she" in his "ode to melancholy", perhaps this also reveals his attitude towards women!! And it's interesting that it's a "he" who ends up one of melancholy's "cloudy trophies" - perhaps this also links to the femme fatale thing?
    Yeah, there's an ambiguity regarding "she" in Ode on Melancholy, Keats writes of "thy mistress" in stanza II, and then speaks of Melancholy as "she", so yes, the personification of melancholy as a woman and the reference to a mistress definitely substantiates the femme fatale attitude! AND yet he speaks of melancholy as a goddess; maybe this shows the whole pleasure and pain thing - women cause pain (melancholy) but give great pleasure (goddess, shrine..)?!
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    have you guys been to keats house in hampstead, london? i have, our class went with our teacher just after study leave and it was so wierd seeing everything you read about. fanny brawne and charles brown lived next door to him and there were portaits and personal items everywhere. it really gives you the sense of atmosphere of keatsian time if anyone's intersted (you have 2 days!)
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    (Original post by press2play)
    Yeah, there's an ambiguity regarding "she" in Ode on Melancholy, Keats writes of "thy mistress" in stanza II, and then speaks of Melancholy as "she", so yes, the personification of melancholy as a woman and the reference to a mistress definitely substantiates the femme fatale attitude! AND yet he speaks of melancholy as a goddess; maybe this shows the whole pleasure and pain thing - women cause pain (melancholy) but give great pleasure (goddess, shrine..)?!
    Yeah, and I suppose this also links with negative capability: you can't separate bliss from pain (lamia): like when he says that "he who can burst Joy's grape" will become one of melancholy's "cloudy trophies": do you think this is saying that he who experiences joy will eventually experience melancholy, cos i'm not quite sure but that was what I thought?!
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    have you guys been to keats house in hampstead, london? i have, our class went with our teacher just after study leave and it was so wierd seeing everything you read about. fanny brawne and charles brown lived next door to him and there were portaits and personal items everywhere. it really gives you the sense of atmosphere of keatsian time if anyone's intersted (you have 2 days!)
    WOW ur so lucky we never got to do anything like that!
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    i'm a bit confused about te ending of Ode on Melancholy' what is he saying about the 'trophies' ?

    yes i guess it is lucky that his house is in london, and living in london, we got the opportunity, but i'm sure you can see it online if you can't get down there
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    try this website

    www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/keats

    thats the address given on the guide we got
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    (Original post by musicman)
    Yeah, and I suppose this also links with negative capability: you can't separate bliss from pain (lamia): like when he says that "he who can burst Joy's grape" will become one of melancholy's "cloudy trophies": do you think this is saying that he who experiences joy will eventually experience melancholy, cos i'm not quite sure but that was what I thought?!

    yeh i think it does mean that he who expresses joy expresses melancholy-as he always put the two together, thinking you have to really feel one to experience the other
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    i'm a bit confused about te ending of Ode on Melancholy' what is he saying about the 'trophies' ?

    yes i guess it is lucky that his house is in london, and living in london, we got the opportunity, but i'm sure you can see it online if you can't get down there
    I think he's saying that he who "can burst joy's grape against his fine palate" - i.e. he who experiences joy, will become one of melancholy's "cloudy trophies" - by this, I think it's kind of saying that he'll eventually 'contribute to melancholy's trophy cabinet' - obviously that's a crap way of putting it but it's like he'll eventually be defeated by melancholy: perhaps as a result he's saying that he who experiences "joy" will inevitably experience "melancholy" at some point in his life - the two are not mutually exclusive?! That's how I interpreted it anyway, does that help??
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    great thanks! getting easier i must say!
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    (Original post by musicman)
    I think he's saying that he who "can burst joy's grape against his fine palate" - i.e. he who experiences joy, will become one of melancholy's "cloudy trophies" - by this, I think it's kind of saying that he'll eventually 'contribute to melancholy's trophy cabinet' - obviously that's a crap way of putting it but it's like he'll eventually be defeated by melancholy: perhaps as a result he's saying that he who experiences "joy" will inevitably experience "melancholy" at some point in his life - the two are not mutually exclusive?! That's how I interpreted it anyway, does that help??
    I agree, I think he's saying that by experiencing pleasure and "burst[ing] joy's grape", it is inevitable that 'he' will "be among [melancholy's] cloudy trophies hung". Stating that experiencing happiness can only end in misery, but then saying that melancholy in itself is an intense experience to be appreciated, due to language of "trophies", etc.
 
 
 
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