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    (Original post by press2play)
    I agree, I think he's saying that by experiencing pleasure and "burst[ing] joy's grape", it is inevitable that 'he' will "be among [melancholy's] cloudy trophies hung". Stating that experiencing happiness can only end in misery, but then saying that melancholy in itself is an intense experience to be appreciated, due to language of "trophies", etc.
    but perhaps "cloudy" implies that the trophies are dirty or in some way improper?? Perhaps this links back to his cynicism again? I'll just be quiet, i'm confusing myself now!!
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    (Original post by musicman)
    but perhaps "cloudy" implies that the trophies are dirty or in some way improper?? Perhaps this links back to his cynicism again? I'll just be quiet, i'm confusing myself now!!
    lol, I think 'cloudy' is just typical Keats to be honest. You know, his 'even great things aren't perfect' attitude. And he's explaining the inseparable nature of opposites in life.. I think we best drop that point before everyone starts getting confused!!
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    (Original post by press2play)
    lol, I think 'cloudy' is just typical Keats to be honest. You know, his 'even great things aren't perfect' attitude. And he's explaining the inseparable nature of opposites in life.. I think we best drop that point before everyone starts getting confused!!
    Lol I saw it more as being a victim of melancholy rather than melancholy being something good, but I think we best drop it!
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    (Original post by musicman)
    Lol I saw it more as being a victim of melancholy rather than melancholy being something good, but I think we best drop it!
    Haha I think we're going to have to!
    Although yeah I see your point - this is good actually, if this poem comes up we can argue an opposite opinion!!
    Victim of melancholy, definitely. But you know Keats, his obsession with sadness and death being something that has to be experienced to appreciate the good things in life [thus, a good thing].. ummm thinking of quotes to back this up, "Verse, Fame and Beauty are intense indeed, /But death intenser" from Why did I Laugh Tonight, and "I have two luxuries to brood over in my walks, your Loveliness and the hour of my death", from a letter to Fanny.
    Point dropped!!
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    you're both on the path of becoming english literature critics
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    you're both on the path of becoming english literature critics
    Haha
    Providing we can argue with one another!!
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    you're both on the path of becoming english literature critics
    nooooooooooooooooooooo
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    lol or not!
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    I really need help... what poems would you use on the theme of "education" in Blake? Im really stuck!! :confused:
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    omg ur all scaring me i can barely revise for this until my histry is done!!
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    (Original post by wibble...)
    I really need help... what poems would you use on the theme of "education" in Blake? Im really stuck!! :confused:

    i cant find much either! The schoolboy in innocence shows Blake doesnt like formal education he feels it cuts off the imagination!

    "the buds are nipped/And blossoms blown away"- shows how the imagiantion and potential of the child is stopped by education.

    similary the rhetorical quest - "how can the bird that is born for joy/Sit in a cage and sing?" provides further evidence how formal education restircts the child.

    in contrast Blake feels much happy when in A little Black Boy (IN) "my mother taught me underneath a tree" And it is better for them to learn from nature, "look on the rising sun! there God does live."

    ok can anybody help me with why Blake is a romantic? And what is the Agrarian Revolution ? ( pastoral imagery??)
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    The agrarian revolution is a change in work places really. More money was to be made out of farming sheep rather than crops so less workers were needed to work the land. A reduction in the number of jobs drove people to live in large cities. The cities expanded enormously due to this influx so the living conditions were terrible. The new jobs in the cities were due to the industrial revolution and lots of men also signed up in the forces.

    Blake as a romantic
    Blake shared many beliefs with other romantic poets such as
    - power of imagination
    - importance of childrens play to learn
    - God is evident in the natural world
    - importance of the natural world (following natural cycles etc)
    - belief in the individual, and in respecting others opinions

    Hope that helps a bit.

    I don't know anywhere near enough quotes! I'm really starting to panic about this whole thing. I can't get enough of it to stay in my mind!!!! :eek:
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    thanks for that rshev and ali... it sounds like you know your stuff so i wouldn't worry too much! Im going to have to leave my revision right until the last minute cuz i have 2 evil exams on monday afternoon which are taking up all my time! Do you think its possible to revise Blake and Othello in a day? I really need to get an A in this exam as i buggered up my war exam... so worried about it all!
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    Wibble!

    Of course you can revise Blake and Othello in one day!!! It is only revision remember!! You've been taking in all this stuff for months and gradually getting it into your brain. The last few days of revision are just for getting it organised and clear in your mind.

    My advice (for what it is worth!) would be to make sure you don't waste any time faffing around. Read through just the poems that you think are important and that you understand. Don't waste time trying to learn something from scratch now. Read and reread the list of contexts for Blake. Write down the minimum number of quotes you think you can get away with and keep reading them.I think you have a great chance of remembering stuff if you condense it all first and actually understand it.


    Othello I think is far more straightforward than Blake anyway. Perhaps make sure you know the plot very well (use a summary rather than the play itself to refresh) write down minimum quotes again and just keep reading them. The questions on Othello are always comparing two opinions and adding your own. As long as you know the story well you'll be able to write something meaningful!!!!

    How did you get on in your other eng lit papers? If you've already done well then you can afford to lose a few marks anyway without it making a huge diff.
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    Othello stuff

    Can somebody explain what this theme means in Othello????

    All beauty must destroy itself?????????????????????????

    Please help Thanks!
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    (Original post by rshev)
    Othello stuff

    Can somebody explain what this theme means in Othello????

    All beauty must destroy itself?????????????????????????

    Please help Thanks!
    Thanks for your advice rshev il just try my best and theres always jan for retakes (although id rather not)

    "All beauty must destroy itself": I would've thought this refers to how the "beauty" we see in things at the beginning of the play, for example the loving relationship between Desdemona and Othello is inevitably destroyed... it shows a pessimistic view of mankind that jealousy and deception leads to our downfall... this is shown in Othello, he has everything at the beginining of the play, a loving wife, respect from society etc and this is inevitably left in ruins...

    does that make any sense?
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    Where did you get that quote from out of interest...
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    yeh where did you get this quote?

    also does anyone know what the dominant assessment objective is in othello? is it AO4. also for my mock, my teacher said i did a good essay, she gave me band 3 for all the assessment objectives except for AO3, as she said, i need more on language, style, form, et. does anyone know how i can include this in an othello essay?
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    yeh where did you get this quote?

    also does anyone know what the dominant assessment objective is in othello? is it AO4. also for my mock, my teacher said i did a good essay, she gave me band 3 for all the assessment objectives except for AO3, as she said, i need more on language, style, form, et. does anyone know how i can include this in an othello essay?
    The dominant AO is AO4 i'm pretty sure - so it's discussing different viewpoints and things which is going to get you your marks. It's very hard to include lots of language features, and how much you do this can only affect ur final mark very slightly: what they do is they reach a final A04 mark, then they consider all the other AOs and adjust it by a couple of marks if necessary. So if you didn't discuss the viewpoints given in the question very well, you might get something like 9 out of 20, but if it was really well written with few errors then it might go up to 10 out of 20 or something for a good AO1. That's what my teacher told me anyway, does that help?
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    yeh where did you get this quote?

    also does anyone know what the dominant assessment objective is in othello? is it AO4. also for my mock, my teacher said i did a good essay, she gave me band 3 for all the assessment objectives except for AO3, as she said, i need more on language, style, form, et. does anyone know how i can include this in an othello essay?
    Write about Iago's soliloquies, I'm sure you can get that in whatever the question! Also the stychomythia technique Shakespeare uses, and the way he often changes from prose to dialogue to accentuate something a character is saying. For language just refer to imagery.. I guess it depends entirely on the question really. Language form and structure is often hard to get in, but as musicman says, if you mention it just enough to show you understand it, the rest of the essay will be more important.
 
 
 
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