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AQA-A A2 English Literature Unit 4 watch

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    thats great thanks. my teacher wrote on the end of my mock that i should mention alliteration etc.-but in shakespeare? how can you just randomly write about this? :confused:
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    ohhhhhh i get it now-i totally forgot about imagery & prose! thanks so much!
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    'stychomythia technique Shakespeare uses'

    what does this mean?-i looked it up in the dictionary before asking, but its not there and i've never heard of it before!

    if you don't mind...
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    Also, to include language in your essay, you can talk about things like repetition (e.g. "Othello's repetition of "the handkerchief" shows his increasing fury"), semantic field (e.g. Brabantio's semantic field of magic and witchcraft reflects how he feels his daughter, who to him symbolises "perfection", has been led astray by the "moor's" "magic", "enchantment" "drugs" and "minerals".), metaphor and simile (Iago's "poison" etc), etc etc....! It certainly shouldn't be the basis of the essay though, perhaps used to emphasise how Shakespeare's play meets the viewpoint given in the question.
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    ohhhhhh i get it now-i totally forgot about imagery & prose! thanks so much!
    You're welcome! [if you were referring to me!]
    As for the alliteration.. I honestly wouldn't know how to put that into an essay, Shakespeare hasn't used it much in Othello has he? Generally I'd write that he does it to convey a mood, or draw attention to a specific piece of dialogue, but I wouldn't know of any examples in Othello.
    Anyone..?
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    'stychomythia technique Shakespeare uses'

    what does this mean?-i looked it up in the dictionary before asking, but its not there and i've never heard of it before!

    if you don't mind...
    Very rapid dialogue.. remember it like a game of tennis lol, quick responses! It often includes finishing off one another's sentences.. y'know Shakespeare writes a lot in iambic pentameter, for example one character would say a sentence with 6 syllables and the next character would finish it with a response of 4. If that makes sense!
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    when i used this quote in my essay,

    'Mere prattle without practice'

    to make my point about iago's feeling vis-à-vis cassio's promotion, she put next to it alliteration. i can see how it alliterates, but don't see how this can be fitted in to the essay...

    oh i was referring to both of you when i said thanks!
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    i want to give you guys some rep (musicman and press2play) but i have to wait 24hrs
    just watch this space though...
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    when i used this quote in my essay,

    'Mere prattle without practice'

    to make my point about iago's feeling vis-à-vis cassio's promotion, she put next to it alliteration. i can see how it alliterates, but don't see how this can be fitted in to the essay...

    oh i was referring to both of you when i said thanks!
    The alliteration uses plosive consonants which enforces how dismissive Iago is of Cassio. You can imagine it spoken by the actor who plays Iago with heavy emphasis on the 'pr's!
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    i want to give you guys some rep (musicman and press2play) but i have to wait 24hrs
    just watch this space though...
    Cheers.....I tried to give you some yesterday (I think it was you) but it wouldn't let me cos I don't have enough points or something. Don't quite understand it!
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    (Original post by sneezyme)
    when i used this quote in my essay,

    'Mere prattle without practice'

    to make my point about iago's feeling vis-à-vis cassio's promotion, she put next to it alliteration. i can see how it alliterates, but don't see how this can be fitted in to the essay...

    oh i was referring to both of you when i said thanks!
    lol ok.

    The 'prattle without practice' bit, maybe you could say that Shakespeare uses the 'p' sound to convey a bitter tone to Iago's words? Almost as though he's spitting the words out, showing his real jealousy of Cassio.. so you'd get it into an essay by saying it is one of Shakespeare's methods of conveying a mood, and that rather than simply using dialogue, he accentuates Iago's attitude by creating a sound. Substantiated when he says of Othello, "loving his own pride and purposes", same point. I think!!
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    yeh isn't it annoying, you have to wait 24 hrs. i have 4 people waiting for my rep, but i can only give one a day!

    'Cheers.....I tried to give you some yesterday (I think it was you) but it wouldn't let me cos I don't have enough points or something. Don't quite understand it!'

    don't worry it's the thought that counts!
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    Also wondered, how are people learning Othello? Do you know what happens in every single act, for example? Like if I said "what happens in act 2 scene 3", you'd know? Cos I don't and I'm worried that I should know the play like this!!
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    wondering if anyone can help- for critical viewpoints is it best to actually directly quote or just paraphrase was a certain critic has said?
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    (Original post by kcpoopoo)
    wondering if anyone can help- for critical viewpoints is it best to actually directly quote or just paraphrase was a certain critic has said?
    I don't think you actually have to include any quotes from critics to get an A. The main thing is to discuss how the two viewpoints in the question apply to the play - I never quoted or even paraphrased people like Bradley and Leavis in my sample essays we did in class, and she has never said we have to !
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    (Original post by kcpoopoo)
    wondering if anyone can help- for critical viewpoints is it best to actually directly quote or just paraphrase was a certain critic has said?
    It's more important to read the critical essays to gain different viewpoints rather than to quote from them. Not to say you shouldn't, just that you don't really need to.
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    (Original post by musicman)
    I don't think you actually have to include any quotes from critics to get an A. The main thing is to discuss how the two viewpoints in the question apply to the play - I never quoted or even paraphrased people like Bradley and Leavis in my sample essays we did in class, and she has never said we have to !
    really?
    our teacher said we can only get into the top band with critical viewpoints.
    i'm so scared of othello/blake exam- what do you think is the best way to revise in this very small space of time?!
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    (Original post by kcpoopoo)
    really?
    our teacher said we can only get into the top band with critical viewpoints.
    i'm so scared of othello/blake exam- what do you think is the best way to revise in this very small space of time?!
    I'm sure you don't need to quote what other people thought: my technique is to look at the viewpoints in the question, and examine how what happens in the play relates to these viewpoints and discuss how far the play meets these viewpoints and whether or not I agree. I don't say things like "and as Bradley said, "...."", if you know what I mean. So I discuss the viewpoints given, but don't introduce others, do I need to?? Can anyone clarify this cos you've scared me now!!!!
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    (Original post by kcpoopoo)
    really?
    our teacher said we can only get into the top band with critical viewpoints.
    i'm so scared of othello/blake exam- what do you think is the best way to revise in this very small space of time?!
    Sorry,as for revision, make sure you have a general overview of Othello and have quotes for significant events (e.g. Othello portrayed as outsider: "Black ram", "moor" etc). Make notes on the characters, with short quotes to support. Try to get your viewpoints into ur head, that's all I can think of! As for Blake, i'm unsure as I do Keats, but look at the main themes and the context and you can't go far wrong!
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    (Original post by kcpoopoo)
    really?
    our teacher said we can only get into the top band with critical viewpoints.
    i'm so scared of othello/blake exam- what do you think is the best way to revise in this very small space of time?!
    Just to reassure you, I did the exam in January. I didn't include any critics' comments and I got full marks What I did do was include lots of context info for Blake and for Othello, I made sure I explored lots of different possible interpretations and arguments. If you're stuck for time, go through the poems and memorise key quotes that can support general themes, rather than trying to remember every word. For Othello, I found the best revision was literally reading the book as much as I could.

    Good luck guys! You all sound like you're really well prepared so hope it goes well xxx
 
 
 
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