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    anybody got any quotes /evidence to suggest why othello is noble, desdemona is virtuous to save me time trying to find um please!!
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    'All beauty must destroy itself eventually'

    I got this quote from a revision book that unfortunately just says it is written by 'a leading critic'. Sorry! It does also say that it is one of the 6 key critical issues!!

    Anyway thanks for your ideas I think you are probably right. Perhaps everything that seems too good to be true isn't actually true at all!

    There are some great comments on this thread. Thanks everyone for the interesting points. It is a great help!
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    (Original post by rshev)
    'All beauty must destroy itself eventually'

    I got this quote from a revision book that unfortunately just says it is written by 'a leading critic'. Sorry! It does also say that it is one of the 6 key critical issues!!

    Anyway thanks for your ideas I think you are probably right. Perhaps everything that seems too good to be true isn't actually true at all!

    There are some great comments on this thread. Thanks everyone for the interesting points. It is a great help!
    oh right... so what are the other critical issues... (if you don't mind)
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    (Original post by ali*117)
    anybody got any quotes /evidence to suggest why othello is noble, desdemona is virtuous to save me time trying to find um please!!
    Othello is noble at the beginning - we see his love for Desdemona: "I love thee gentle Desdemona", he is well-respected by everyone, though it is asserted that he is an outsider - "noble moor". His nobility declines throughout the play when he loses all trust and faith in Desdemona: his semantic field changes to feature degrading terms such as "bawd", "strumpet", though he is still noble in that he confesses he still does "love" her, but HAS to kill her so that she will not "betray other men" in future: he will "kill thee, and love thee after".

    Desdemona's virtuosity: "white ewe", "put out thy light", religious god-like, chaste imagery. Her constant use of religious language: "Heaven", "bless" etc. I'll post more up if I can think of any. Don't know if that helps!
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    (Original post by slowjamz)
    Just to reassure you, I did the exam in January. I didn't include any critics' comments and I got full marks What I did do was include lots of context info for Blake and for Othello, I made sure I explored lots of different possible interpretations and arguments. If you're stuck for time, go through the poems and memorise key quotes that can support general themes, rather than trying to remember every word. For Othello, I found the best revision was literally reading the book as much as I could.

    Good luck guys! You all sound like you're really well prepared so hope it goes well xxx
    i thought you weren't meant to discuss context in Othello?! :confused:
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    (Original post by musicman)
    his semantic field changes to feature degrading terms such as "bawd", "strumpet", though he is still noble in that he confesses he still does "love" her, but HAS to kill her so that she will not "betray other men" in future: he will "kill thee, and love thee after".
    what does semantic field mean? i haven't heard of that term before... :confused:
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    (Original post by wibble...)
    what does semantic field mean? i haven't heard of that term before... :confused:
    It is when the language used carries a common theme: for example, if in a poem there were words like "melodious", "bugle", "song", "chants", "harmony", it would have a semantic field of music. Does that help?
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    (Original post by wibble...)
    i thought you weren't meant to discuss context in Othello?! :confused:
    No, you're not I meant context for Blake and different interpretations for Othello, sorry if the wording wasn't clear.
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    slowjamz can u remmber what questions there were u jan for othello/blake i'm intrigued!

    thanks for those quote musicman they are just what i wanted!
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    (Original post by musicman)
    It is when the language used carries a common theme: for example, if in a poem there were words like "melodious", "bugle", "song", "chants", "harmony", it would have a semantic field of music. Does that help?
    yea totally... thanks!
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    (Original post by ali*117)
    slowjamz can u remmber what questions there were u jan for othello/blake i'm intrigued!

    thanks for those quote musicman they are just what i wanted!
    It's OK: I have past questions for Jun+Jan 02 and Jun+Jan 03 if they're of any use, but no Jan 04 unfortunately. If any1 has Jan 04 they'd help me too!
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    (Original post by musicman)
    It's OK: I have past questions for Jun+Jan 02 and Jun+Jan 03 if they're of any use, but no Jan 04 unfortunately. If any1 has Jan 04 they'd help me too!
    I read some of the examiner's report for Jan 04 and they were banging on about Blake's revolutionary vision... So I'm guessing one of the Blake questions had something to do with that.
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    wasn't one of the jan 04 othello questions something about cassio and roderigo being puppets... :confused:
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    Apparently, the Jan 04 Keats question was something about Paganism and Christianity: where on earth is this in his poetry, I wouldn't have a clue!
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    Sure here are the 6 critical perspectives according to the revision book
    1.Whether Othello is anything more than a personal tragedy
    2.The nature of the audience response to the dramatic effects within the play
    3. whether Desdemona is a temptress or a victim
    4. Whether Othello is a noble man
    5. Whether Iago is a devil, or just a jealous, scheming individual
    6. The idea that eveerything that is beautiful will decay and destroy itself


    Jan 04 questions were
    1. Shakespeare gave his play the wrong title. It should be entitled 'Iago'
    'Othello is a tragic hero, Iago only the means to his tragedy.'
    How far do you agree? Why do you think Shakespeare chose 'Othello' as the title?



    2. The most dramatic episode in othello is that where Iago provokes the brawl between Cassio and the cypriots

    The most dramatic episode in Othello is the one where Iago first begins to poison Othello's mind against Desdemona and Cassio

    How dramatic do you think both these episodes are?
    Which in your opinion is the most dramatic?

    Hope that helps!!!
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    ooo i wouldv liked the othello being a tragic hero to have come up... the other one i wouldn't have a clue though!

    Thanks for your help rshev!!
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    Anyone else doing the Duchess of Malfi or is it just me? :confused:
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    I have come up with the following important episodes for Othello:

     When Iago reveals Desdemona and Othello’s relationship.
     The murder of Desdemona.
     The realisation that Othello has been tricked by Iago.
     When Othello confronts Desdemona and strikes her.
     When Cassio is plied with alcohol and begins a drunken brawl.

    Can anybody think of any more?
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    What about Act 1 Sciii - Othello justifies his relationship to the senators. This scene gives lots of evidence of the mutual love O + D had initially.

    Good list though. I'm trying to think of key scenes that you could get asked about as well.
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    (Original post by musicman)
    Apparently, the Jan 04 Keats question was something about Paganism and Christianity: where on earth is this in his poetry, I wouldn't have a clue!
    omg-what the hell??? :confused:
    thank god that's out the way though! do you know what the second question for keats was?
 
 
 
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