B892 - The Alternative Tax (Repeal) Bill 2015 Watch

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Birchington
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B892 - The Alternative Tax (Repeal) Bill 2015, The Hon. Jammy Duel MP and The Hon. Nigel Farage MEP MP

The Alternative Tax (Repeal) Bill 2015


A
BILL
TO


Repeal The Alternative Tax Act 2015 – V867


BE IT ENACTED by The Queen's most Excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Commons in this present Parliament assembled, in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-

1 Repeal

V867 - The Alternative Tax Act 2015 will be repealed.

2 Extent, Commencement & Short Title

1) This Act extends to the whole of the United Kingdom
2) This section comes into force on the day on which this Act is passed.
3) This Act may be cited as the Alternative Tax (Repeal) Act 2015


NotesNotes

The prime reason for The Alternative Tax Act 2015 should be repealed, bar being a terrible bill which helps nobody, is that when it passed it was by a single vote and based on poor costing that in no way accurately represents the true cost of the Act, in particular the true cost of the Land Value Tax. To do this we need two things, first, the total area of the land the bill will tax, for this we shall establish both an upper and a lower bound; second we require the average value of the aforementioned land. For these calculations we shall only consider England, and not the UK as a whole, as all the data needed for England is readily available so requires no real extrapolation and still sufficiently well demonstrates the failing of the Act.

First of all, we need to know the total land area of England, 130,279 km2, or 13,027,900ha. Next we shall eliminate all rural land to establish an upper bound for the taxable land, to do this we need to know how much of England is classified as urban (what counts as urban becomes relevant later) which currently stands at approximately 10.6%[1], or an area of 1,381,000 ha (rounded to the nearest 1000 ha). Next we need to consider the value of the land, something that is easily enough done given that the Government already estimate land value in England for policy appraisal, and from this we find that the average land value in England stands at £6,017,000[2] to the nearest £1,000. This gives a total land value of £8.3tn (to the nearest 100bn) and a corresponding urban Land Value Tax of £415bn (to the nearest billion) for our upper bound for England.

Next we shall consider the lower bound, here we have to look at what actually counts as "urban land", 6.6% of urban land consists of lakes, reservoirs, rivers and canals[1]; a further 54% is "green space"[2], i.e. parks, allotments, sports pitches, etc and, for the sake of argument, we shall define ALL of this to be publicly held and thus exempt under the bill, despite this being an absurdity, this gives us 60.4% exempt from the Land Value Tax, or in other words, a lower bound of £165bn, double initially stated, for the urban land in England alone, assuming the green space and water to be equally distributed throughout all the urban areas, note that gardens are not included in green space. This still represents an average household cost of approximately £8,000, several times greater than current council tax costs for those that pay the full rate, and even more so for those who receive council tax support, this Act would drive such people out of their homes.

Neither the upper, nor lower bounds consider the urban land value of Scotland, Wales, or Northern Ireland. Furthermore, it does not consider agricultural land which makes up 71.3% of all land in the UK[3], or 17,369,393 ha with a land value of £21,000 per ha[2] which would give a UK wide revenue from the Land Value Tax from agricultural land of a further £18bn and force some farms out of business.

Currently the large council tax band is band A where the average council tax is £989. The most expensive band, H, pays an average of £2968 in council tax. The Alternative Tax Bill makes every person in England worse off unless the person lives in a high-rise apartment where there is the benefit of multiple properties sharing the Land Value Tax burden.

[1]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-18623096
[2]https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/407155/February_2015_Land_value_publica tion_FINAL.pdf
[3]http://data.worldbank.org/indicator/AG.LND.AGRI.ZS
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PetrosAC
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Formatting of Notes is broken for me Birchington
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James Milibanter
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Nay
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Birchington
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(Original post by PetrosAC)
Formatting of Notes is broken for me Birchington
Hopefully that works for you now.
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PetrosAC
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(Original post by Birchington)
Hopefully that works for you now.
Nope. The Right side of it is over the side bar. It might just be my web browser
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Hazzer1998
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Aye
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James Milibanter
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(Original post by hazzer1998)
Aye
You spelt 'Nay' wrong
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username1524603
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(Original post by James Milibanter)
Nay
I hope you read the explanation to see that the Alternative Tax Bill gives all people an average of £8000 tax a year to pay. This is £7000 more than the council tax it repeals, it affects the poorest in society more than the wealthy; it would be different if annual rental values were used which is advocated by mainstream politicians.
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James Milibanter
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(Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
I hope you read the explanation to see that the Alternative Tax Bill gives all people an average of £8000 tax a year to pay. This is £7000 more than the council tax it repeals, it affects the poorest in society more than the wealthy; it would be different if LVT was written properly to use annual rental rates as advocated by mainstream politicians.
Well then amend the act, don't repeal it.
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emiloujess
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(Original post by PetrosAC)
Nope. The Right side of it is over the side bar. It might just be my web browser
Same for me Are you on Chrome by any chance?


and Nay.
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PetrosAC
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(Original post by emiloujess)
Same for me Are you on Chrome by any chance?


and Nay.
Yup, Chrome
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cranbrook_aspie
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What I find ironic about this is that both proposers complained about repeating the Lords reform debate.

Nay.

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emiloujess
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(Original post by PetrosAC)
Yup, Chrome
Must be that then
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PetrosAC
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Nay. Amend the bill, don't repeal it
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Andy98
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Amend it, don't repeal it

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Jammy Duel
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See the notes for my reasoning, but aye, it was an abominable Act in the first place and passed on the narrowest of margin *cough* after whipping*cough* and demonstrates ineptitude on the part of the government.
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Jammy Duel
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And to those who say amend rather than repeal, if you wish to spend many hours a day for several days, at the very least, to amend it, feel free, you could probably then give it to a real MP to get touched up the sorts of things you would have to implement to make it do what is intended.
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demx9
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Aye, because I'm against property taxes
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James Milibanter
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(Original post by demx9)
Aye, because I'm against property taxes
You do realise that the bill they're repealing also got rid of Council Tax and Business Rates, right?
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Jammy Duel
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(Original post by James Milibanter)
You do realise that the bill they're repealing also got rid of Council Tax and Business Rates, right?
Which are not really property taxes, you don't have to own the property to pay them, and are at a significantly lower rate.
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