Should I take A-Level English or Law?

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niomibarber
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#1
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#1
So far I have decided that I would like to take Government & Politics, French, and History at A-Level. However, I'm stuck on my fourth choice. At this point, it is definitely between English (Language or Literature) or Law.
I have already done my GCSE in English Literature and have an A*, and I have always enjoyed English. But after A-Levels I would like to take Law at University and become a lawyer. Many people have said that law is unnecessary to take at A-Level, an acquaintance even told me that taking A-Level law disadvantaged him when doing Law at Uni as it was hard to 'forget what he had learned' as his teachers instructed him to. Yet a good friend who is now doing Law at uni maintains that she would be really struggling if she hadn't done A-Level law.

I'm interested to hear other people's perspectives, obviously the decision is up to me ultimately but I would really like to hear some more opinions.
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Reader106
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#2
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#2
English imo
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username944192
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#3
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#3
(Original post by niomibarber)
So far I have decided that I would like to take Government & Politics, French, and History at A-Level. However, I'm stuck on my fourth choice. At this point, it is definitely between English (Language or Literature) or Law.
I have already done my GCSE in English Literature and have an A*, and I have always enjoyed English. But after A-Levels I would like to take Law at University and become a lawyer. Many people have said that law is unnecessary to take at A-Level, an acquaintance even told me that taking A-Level law disadvantaged him when doing Law at Uni as it was hard to 'forget what he had learned' as his teachers instructed him to. Yet a good friend who is now doing Law at uni maintains that she would be really struggling if she hadn't done A-Level law.

I'm interested to hear other people's perspectives, obviously the decision is up to me ultimately but I would really like to hear some more opinions.
Law isn't considered a strong A level but your other 3 subjects are solid so if you would prefer an introduction to law I don't see the problem taking it (I would drop it at A2 and keep those first 3 though personally or carry on all 4). On my law degree tonnes of people hadn't done law A level, those who had were in the minority. Of my friendship group, the 2 people who had done law A level failed first year and had to resit. Not suggesting there's a correlation, more that doing law A level doesn't help that much for everyone. Law A level is not a prerequisite for a law degree and therefore you will be fine taking a law degree without it, if you don't want to do it that's no problem. My school didn't even offer law A level
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Bupdeeboowah
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#4
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#4
(Original post by niomibarber)
So far I have decided that I would like to take Government & Politics, French, and History at A-Level. However, I'm stuck on my fourth choice. At this point, it is definitely between English (Language or Literature) or Law.
I have already done my GCSE in English Literature and have an A*, and I have always enjoyed English. But after A-Levels I would like to take Law at University and become a lawyer. Many people have said that law is unnecessary to take at A-Level, an acquaintance even told me that taking A-Level law disadvantaged him when doing Law at Uni as it was hard to 'forget what he had learned' as his teachers instructed him to. Yet a good friend who is now doing Law at uni maintains that she would be really struggling if she hadn't done A-Level law.

I'm interested to hear other people's perspectives, obviously the decision is up to me ultimately but I would really like to hear some more opinions.
Take English, I have heard that A Level law is frowned upon by some universities. Also, the things taught at A Levels are very different to the LLB, and may only get you so far as your first year of law at university.
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Lucasium
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#5
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#5
Further Maths
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ju1
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#6
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#6
Take English. The skills developed from taking A Level English (especially English Literature) are invaluable to most people, but especially so if you're going to be studying a heavy subject like Law:

You need to enjoy reading to do Law, as everyone on that degree says that to do well you will need to read a whole lot of books and random papers on the subject, and reading widely is obviously a major part of doing well in English Literature as well. Law A Level doesn't develop those skills, the information tends to be more 'spoon-fed'.

Secondly, the English Literature exam is closed-text (meaning you have to know all relevant quotes off by heart and thoroughly understand the texts covered in the syllabus), which sounds really horrible but means that the skills are more intensive and you will find certain aspects of doing a Law degree much easier (such as learning off large amounts of specific information on e.g. property law) as you will have experience of memorising large amounts of information accurately.

Thirdly, all successful lawyers need really strong persuasive skills, and continuing English onto A Level will allow you to cultivate those skills.

All the universities I visited advised against taking Law A Level for the reason you mentioned above. English is loads of effort and everyone complains about it being really long, but if you like reading you will do well. In my opinion it is an excellent preparatory subject for Law!
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Cal-lum
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#7
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#7
English is the best
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awesomewarsome
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#8
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#8
(Original post by niomibarber)
So far I have decided that I would like to take Government & Politics, French, and History at A-Level. However, I'm stuck on my fourth choice. At this point, it is definitely between English (Language or Literature) or Law.
I have already done my GCSE in English Literature and have an A*, and I have always enjoyed English. But after A-Levels I would like to take Law at University and become a lawyer. Many people have said that law is unnecessary to take at A-Level, an acquaintance even told me that taking A-Level law disadvantaged him when doing Law at Uni as it was hard to 'forget what he had learned' as his teachers instructed him to. Yet a good friend who is now doing Law at uni maintains that she would be really struggling if she hadn't done A-Level law.

I'm interested to hear other people's perspectives, obviously the decision is up to me ultimately but I would really like to hear some more opinions.
Hi,
I too got an A* at literature gcse but its nothing like gcse at a level lol, its a completely different medium, i hated it and wish i never picked it, but im in A2 now and i guess I have to just get on with it ugh, i also do law and I ABSOLUTELY LOVEEEEE IT, its so much easier than gcse, the alevel is way easier, pick law!
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High Stakes
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#9
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#9
English Literature. English Literature. English Literature. English Literature. English Literature. English Literature. English Literature. English Literature.

Law is soft and won't help you get into any top universities.
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Danimillie
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#10
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#10
I do both and Law is easier as all you have to learn is the facts and advantages and disadvantages. English Literature is much harder but if you love English you will still do well, they are both respected (Law is on Kings College London's preferred list but at the same time on LSE's non-preferred list) but English Literature is highly respected by every single university. Just choose based on what universities you like and what you think you'll enjoy most and do best at
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ByronicHero
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#11
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#11
Given your other selections, either choice is fine. I would suggest you study whatever subject you enjoy in this case but it is certainly true that English literature is the more "respected choice".
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