Wimbs
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
An issue that is not confined to students of course! (I am 35 and have not been a student for over a decade!)

Do you get it?

And what causes it?

I believe there are several factors working together insidiously..............

1. If you have been drinking, the alcohol is a depressant. In a way, you are 'spending your happiness' in advance by the relaxing/disinhibiting effect of the drink but you get the converse the next day.

2. Sleep deprivation. Missing out on the deepest sleep of the night by having a late night and then waking up late depresses you anyway for some reason! (try deliberately getting up at 4am - it tires you but is strangely elating!)

3. Any feeling of missed opportunities (the lady you 'nearly' pulled etc.)

4. Going home to an empty flat back into isolation.

5. A combination of getting up late and being tired meaning you don't do much all day - which is in itself depressing!

6. That horrible knowledge you have spent money and perhaps can't afford to go out again until the next payday/student loan instalment?

7. The next day can sometimes be a Sunday which can be depressing in itself as its work on Monday!

8. The transition from a buzzy atmosphere full of music/lights/people to deafening quiet.

9. Your body feeling a bit rotten from the inevitable junk food post club (kebab etc.)

10. If you have a 'not doing things twice' obsession like me, knowing you have 'used up' your visit to a particular place!

And how to combat them?

1. Go 'dayclubbing?' (available on Bank Holidays/Sundays in places like the Custard Factory) - going to bed at a reasonable hour means you feel better the next day 9and more sobered up!)

2. Plan stuff to do the day after, even if you feel wrecked!

3. Go out again the next night? (although the comedown can be worse still, and the comedown from a festival can be horrific and worse than coming home off a holiday!)

4. Get out in the sun (not an option at this time of year usually!)

5. Go on a long walk.

6. Book tickets for your next night out?

7. Go on Tinder etc to at least make you feel you have 'irons in the fire' in getting a partner.

8. A massive fry up/comfort food!

9. Hair of the dog! A day of complete sobriety can be hard to take after 5 pints the previous night! (and many would consider 5 lightweight!)

10. Don't drink at all?! Pints of Coke and ice can be deliciously refreshing and water can turn the dance session into a workout!
2
reply
Klix88
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#2
Report 5 years ago
#2
I hate to raise the spectre of age, but you're 35 and trying to party like an 18 year old. Your body can't cope. I know - I'm 51 and went through it! Hangovers last 24 hours and are no longer resolved with a couple of paracetamol and a cup of tea. Alcohol is a depressive (despite the initial euphoria of being drunk) and that aspect really starts kicking in as you age, hence the post night out blues which you've never had before.

There isn't a resolution. None of us can go back to our 18 year old physical resilience to caning it, All you can do is deal with the individual symptoms if you intend to carry on as you are. But the better idea is coming to grips with your new boundaries and partying up to them, rather than past them. Don't try to keep up with the 18 year olds - that way lies madness!
1
reply
Hevachan
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#3
Report 5 years ago
#3
I don't drink because I get really bad blues off it. I think the alcohol is the biggest problem! And the no sleep
1
reply
z33
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#4
Report 5 years ago
#4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=scd-uNNxgrU
0
reply
IamJacksContempt
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#5
Report 5 years ago
#5
I don't know why but I'm usually in a better mood after a night out.


Unless it's one of those really, really bad hangovers or you did something horrible that night.
1
reply
Wimbs
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#6
I hate to raise the spectre of age, but you're 35 and trying to party like an 18 year old. Your body can't cope. I know - I'm 51 and went through it! Hangovers last 24 hours and are no longer resolved with a couple of paracetamol and a cup of tea. Alcohol is a depressive (despite the initial euphoria of being drunk) and that aspect really starts kicking in as you age, hence the post night out blues which you've never had before.
Good to know there are fellow 'more mature' people keeping an eye out for the youngsters !

You are correct, when I was 18 if I partied in this way, I may feel hungover for a bit but full of energy before noon! Due to shyness/social avoidance I feel I missed out a lot on partying in my youth and am playing catch up lol! But it would be interesting to see if studies have been done into whether alcohol depresses you more after it as you age!
0
reply
Puddles the Monkey
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#7
Report 5 years ago
#7
I hit 2-- and almost overnight started getting the most horrible post night out blues - worse than the physical hangover!

Careful not to drink as much these days. Pre-drinking seems to make it much worse. :beard:

(Original post by Klix88)
There isn't a resolution. None of us can go back to our 18 year old physical resilience to caning it, All you can do is deal with the individual symptoms if you intend to carry on as you are. But the better idea is coming to grips with your new boundaries and partying up to them, rather than past them. Don't try to keep up with the 18 year olds - that way lies madness!
The 18 year olds are alright, it's the 22-23 year olds who have been going out regularly for a few years who are madness :teehee:
0
reply
thatcooldude2.0
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#8
Report 5 years ago
#8
A short guide to getting rid of post night out blues.
Step 1 : Pick them up
Step 2: Throw them out of the nearest window
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Poll: What factors affect your mental health most right now? Post-lockdown edition

Anxiousness about restrictions easing (47)
6.08%
Uncertainty around my education (89)
11.51%
Uncertainty around my future career prospects (80)
10.35%
Lack of purpose or motivation (99)
12.81%
Lack of support system (eg. teachers, counsellors, delays in care) (40)
5.17%
Impact lockdown had on physical health (43)
5.56%
Social worries (incl. loneliness/making friends) (85)
11%
Financial worries (51)
6.6%
Concern about myself or my loves ones getting/having been ill (34)
4.4%
Exposure to negative news/social media (48)
6.21%
Difficulty accessing real life entertainment (25)
3.23%
Lack of confidence in making big life decisions (72)
9.31%
Worry about missed opportunities during the pandemic (60)
7.76%

Watched Threads

View All