robzpotter
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hey all, I have my AS mocks after Christmas and wanted to start revising now. I love chemistry but like most people I find it hard revising without getting distracted And Ideas on how to revise effectly?
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RMNDK
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#2
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#2
(Original post by robzpotter)
Hey all, I have my AS mocks after Christmas and wanted to start revising now. I love chemistry but like most people I find it hard revising without getting distracted And Ideas on how to revise effectly?
What's distracting you?

Remove the stimulus/stimuli.
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robzpotter
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#3
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#3
(Original post by RMNDK)
What's distracting you?

Remove the stimulus/stimuli.
Everything distracts me... I don't no what to do
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RMNDK
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#4
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#4
(Original post by robzpotter)
Everything distracts me... I don't no what to do
Then block everything.

Shut down your computer, hide it away.
Hide your phone or get your mum to change the pin lock.
Don't watch TV. Stay in your room and lock it.
I don't what else could possibly distract you.

If the little procrastination habits remain, like daydreaming, drawing, humming, all that stuff, then feel free and fail your mock exams.
If you really want to get a decent score in your mock exams, then work for it.

You might not be one of those "hardcore" revision people. Set up a revision schedule. Do an 1 hour of one subject, solid revising from your notes/textbook/questions, and chill for like 20 minutes. Then do it again.

There are some good distractions, like music, outdoors/indoors, so if that helps use it to your advantage.

If chemistry's boring, then revise small sections of it. Don't attack it all at once. Like, even within a chapter just go over a few pages or sub-chapters and make sure you understand it. Then take a lil break. It's gonna get some time getting used to enjoying chem
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Pigster
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#5
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#5
Ask yourself the question, "why am I doing A-levels?"

Seriously, what is your entire life goal? Do you need to take A-levels or are you doing them to put off having to make a decision about what to do now? If the plan is to go to uni, is that also just to put off the decision about what to do? (it was for me)

Lets say your dream job is to be a teacher. You need a degree to do a PGCE. If you don't get a degree, dream over. Without A-levels, no degree, no dream. When you sit there looking for an excuse to not work, the mental lightbulb flashes on - no worky no dream. If you don't know what the end-goal is, you're not going to get the motivation you need.

I teach at a high-flying independent school, mostly populated by international students. Our students get fantastic results, but not too many of them are seriously clever, they're just super hard working. They have plans and they know that the only way to get there is to work hard. So, come ten o'clock on a Saturday night, they're in the library, unsupervised, working silently. No X-factor for them.
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ARK_REVISES
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#6
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#6
(Original post by Pigster)
Ask yourself the question, "why am I doing A-levels?"

Seriously, what is your entire life goal? Do you need to take A-levels or are you doing them to put off having to make a decision about what to do now? If the plan is to go to uni, is that also just to put off the decision about what to do? (it was for me)

Lets say your dream job is to be a teacher. You need a degree to do a PGCE. If you don't get a degree, dream over. Without A-levels, no degree, no dream. When you sit there looking for an excuse to not work, the mental lightbulb flashes on - no worky no dream. If you don't know what the end-goal is, you're not going to get the motivation you need.

I teach at a high-flying independent school, mostly populated by international students. Our students get fantastic results, but not too many of them are seriously clever, they're just super hard working. They have plans and they know that the only way to get there is to work hard. So, come ten o'clock on a Saturday night, they're in the library, unsupervised, working silently. No X-factor for them.
that was a motivational talk, Touch me down
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robzpotter
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#7
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#7
(Original post by Pigster)
Ask yourself the question, "why am I doing A-levels?"

Seriously, what is your entire life goal? Do you need to take A-levels or are you doing them to put off having to make a decision about what to do now? If the plan is to go to uni, is that also just to put off the decision about what to do? (it was for me)

Lets say your dream job is to be a teacher. You need a degree to do a PGCE. If you don't get a degree, dream over. Without A-levels, no degree, no dream. When you sit there looking for an excuse to not work, the mental lightbulb flashes on - no worky no dream. If you don't know what the end-goal is, you're not going to get the motivation you need.

I teach at a high-flying independent school, mostly populated by international students. Our students get fantastic results, but not too many of them are seriously clever, they're just super hard working. They have plans and they know that the only way to get there is to work hard. So, come ten o'clock on a Saturday night, they're in the library, unsupervised, working silently. No X-factor for them.
Well what I want to do is pharmacology and to get in its AAB
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Pigster
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#8
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#8
I did pharmacology for my first degree.

I didn't mean to, I swapped onto it as I didn't do my chemistry lab work in year 1 and couldn't be bothered to double-up in year 2.

Why do you want to study it?
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robzpotter
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#9
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by Pigster)
I did pharmacology for my first degree.

I didn't mean to, I swapped onto it as I didn't do my chemistry lab work in year 1 and couldn't be bothered to double-up in year 2.

Why do you want to study it?
Well ve always loved science and from a young age wanted to do something to do with medince like be a doctor but honestly I am not gonna get the grades for that so I was looking for other stuff and that really interested me
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