jonnypdot
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So what is the difference between the equations W=VQ and W=1/2 VQ ?
Also if i have 2 horizontal plates one positive other negative, the electric field lines go from positive to negative, protons will be deflected to the negative plate, but when u put an electron does more force have to be put on the electron to do work against the field?
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(Original post by jonnypdot)
So what is the difference between the equations W=VQ and W=1/2 VQ ?
Also if i have 2 horizontal plates one positive other negative, the electric field lines go from positive to negative, protons will be deflected to the negative plate, but when u put an electron does more force have to be put on the electron to do work against the field?
W=VQ is the work done per unit charge to move it through an electric field of potential difference V. However, for the other equation relating to a capacitor, the work done per unit charge stored in the capacitor should be the same as W=VQ and not just half of it, as in W=1/2VQ, but the understanding is that the other half work done is dissipated through the wires when charging the capacitor because, when plotting experimental results of Voltage against Charge on a graph, we get a straight line passing through the origin where the are under the graph is the work done.

This is reasonable in itself because the capacitor has no charge initially, at which moment the voltage across the capacitor is also zero and so as the time goes by, the voltage across the capacitor and the charged stored in it increases linearly. But I don't agree with this explanation and I can explain my position but that's only when you think the "official" explanation is not convincing.

Would you explain the second part of your post?
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jonnypdot
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(Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
W=VQ is the work done per unit charge to move it through an electric field of potential difference V. However, for the other equation relating to a capacitor, the work done per unit charge stored in the capacitor should be the same as W=VQ and not just half of it, as in W=1/2VQ, but the understanding is that the other half work done is dissipated through the wires when charging the capacitor because, when plotting experimental results of Voltage against Charge on a graph, we get a straight line passing through the origin where the are under the graph is the work done.

This is reasonable in itself because the capacitor has no charge initially, at which moment the voltage across the capacitor is also zero and so as the time goes by, the voltage across the capacitor and the charged stored in it increases linearly. But I don't agree with this explanation and I can explain my position but that's only when you think the "official" explanation is not convincing.

Would you explain the second part of your post?
2nd part if field lines go from positive to negative is an electron resisting the field lines?
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(Original post by jonnypdot)
2nd part if field lines go from positive to negative is an electron resisting the field lines?
Field lines being directed from positive to the negative plate have been defined to be the case as a result of a mathematical law (as in the Coulomb's equation). Therefore a negative charge in an electric field is supposedly accelerated in opposite direction to the field lines but nothing is resisting it motion. Field lines are just a hypothetical means of explaining the "force at a distance".
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jonnypdot
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(Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
Field lines being directed from positive to the negative plate have been defined to be the case as a result of a mathematical law (as in the Coulomb's equation). Therefore a negative charge in an electric field is supposedly accelerated in opposite direction to the field lines but nothing is resisting it motion. Field lines are just a hypothetical means of explaining the "force at a distance".
thank you for making that clear, can i please ask what are some similarities and differences between electric and magnetic fields?
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(Original post by jonnypdot)
thank you for making that clear, can i please ask what are some similarities and differences between electric and magnetic fields?
What exam board is it that you are on?
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(Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
What exam board is it that you are on?
ocr
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(Original post by jonnypdot)
ocr
I believe there should be a table in the OCR book comparing both of the fields. If there isn't, I will upload a picture of it.
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(Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
I believe there should be a table in the OCR book comparing both of the fields. If there isn't, I will upload a picture of it.
that is comparing electric and gravitational, and are u a student?
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(Original post by jonnypdot)
that is comparing electric and gravitational, and are u a student?
Oh, sorry, you are right. I don't think it should be difficult to work out the similarities and differences between magnetic and electric fields though. Have you covered the topics yet? It should be easy when you cover the fully
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(Original post by Mehrdad jafari)
Oh, sorry, you are right. I don't think it should be difficult to work out the similarities and differences between magnetic and electric fields though. Have you covered the topics yet? It should be easy when you cover the fully
ok thx bud
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(Original post by jonnypdot)
ok thx bud
No worries!
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