From England to Alaska: how do I get there? Watch

dannii99
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Hi,

So not to drag this on but I'm a 6th form student (first year) currently and I have one set career path to follow but I'm not entirely sure how to get there. The schools careers adviser gave me two options: get my qualifications here and then move or get my qualifications abroad, but I know I want to go to university here (University of Birmingham to be specific). I want to be a clinical psychologist in Alaska and I found out that each state has it's own requirements.

'The Board requires that future psychologists gain at least one year of post-doctoral supervised experience after obtaining their temporary license, or 1500 hours. For each week, you must complete at least one hour of direct supervised experience dealing with a patient or client. This practice must be completed under the eye of a licensed psychologist in the state of Alaska.'
- http://careersinpsychology.org/psych...alaska/#degree

So I assume I would have to have a temporary license and do at least one year of supervised training? I'm just very confused about getting the qualifications, the training, moving and how long it would take to complete all this.

I'd appreciate any advice

- Dan
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Snufkin
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It is almost impossible to emirate to the US, you need to be sponsored by an employer (and that will only happen if no American can do the job). This article might be worth reading.

As far as I know, no British Psychology degree is accredited by the American Psychological Association. If you want to be a Clinical Psychologist in the US then you have to train there, and that is very, very expensive and there's no guarantee that you could stay after you've completed your education anyway. You need to be realistic, Alaska isn't gonna happen.

Focus on getting into university. There is no point thinking about the (very long) process of clinical training until at least the last year of your undergraduate psychology degree.
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_Sinnie_
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(Original post by Snufkin)
As far as I know, no British Psychology degree is accredited by the American Psychological Association. If you want to be a Clinical Psychologist in the US then you have to train there, and that is very, very expensive and there's no guarantee that you could stay after you've completed your education anyway. You need to be realistic, Alaska isn't gonna happen.

Focus on getting into university. There is no point thinking about the (very long) process of clinical training until at least the last year of your undergraduate psychology degree.
http://www.apa.org/membership/member/index.aspx
There seems to be some provision for people educated outside the U.S, I can't imagine that a BPS accredited clinical doctorate wouldn't be considered equivalent to the U.S doctorate.

The earlier you think about getting onto clinical training, the better, in my opinion. Gives you plenty of time to learn all the stuff that no one tells you about. You can start getting relevant work experience, getting involved in research and if you are dead set on going to Alaska, planning how that might happen. Though I don't think it's going to be easy, you may be better of qualifying and practicing here and then moving over when you're more established.
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Snufkin
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(Original post by _Sinnie_)
http://www.apa.org/membership/member/index.aspx
There seems to be some provision for people educated outside the U.S, I can't imagine that a BPS accredited clinical doctorate wouldn't be considered equivalent to the U.S doctorate.

The earlier you think about getting onto clinical training, the better, in my opinion. Gives you plenty of time to learn all the stuff that no one tells you about. You can start getting relevant work experience, getting involved in research and if you are dead set on going to Alaska, planning how that might happen. Though I don't think it's going to be easy, you may be better of qualifying and practicing here and then moving over when you're more established.
The website only says a foreign degree must show "U.S. equivalency", it doesn't say what that that is or if any exist. Much too vague a statement to base a career on.

What exactly can a 16 year old do to prepare? They should be focusing on their A levels / getting into university, not thinking about doing a doctorate.
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_Sinnie_
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(Original post by Snufkin)
The website only says a foreign degree must show "U.S. equivalency", it doesn't say what that that is or if any exist. Much too vague a statement to base a career on.

What exactly can a 16 year old do to prepare? They should be focusing on their A levels / getting into university, not thinking about doing a doctorate.
Vague, perhaps. But not impossible. I don't think it is fair to outright say "You need to be realistic. Alaska isn't gonna happen" when there are ways and means of making it happen. It may be overly complex and practically too difficult to achieve without specific occurences/lots of luck, which is why I advocate qualifying and practicing here while keeping an eye out for opportunities to move.

I was more disagreeing with the suggestion of not thinking about it until your last year of university. I think it is increasingly important to be making inroads while at university, I know for a fact that I am disadvantaged against those that got those placement years, that got their names of a couple of papers and knew what they wanted so could move through the pathway with more ease. Focusing on getting into university and getting a good classification is the number one priority, but unfortunately, it is no longer the only one.
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dannii99
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(Original post by Snufkin)
The website only says a foreign degree must show "U.S. equivalency", it doesn't say what that that is or if any exist. Much too vague a statement to base a career on.

What exactly can a 16 year old do to prepare? They should be focusing on their A levels / getting into university, not thinking about doing a doctorate.
(Original post by _Sinnie_)
Vague, perhaps. But not impossible. I don't think it is fair to outright say "You need to be realistic. Alaska isn't gonna happen" when there are ways and means of making it happen. It may be overly complex and practically too difficult to achieve without specific occurences/lots of luck, which is why I advocate qualifying and practicing here while keeping an eye out for opportunities to move.

I was more disagreeing with the suggestion of not thinking about it until your last year of university. I think it is increasingly important to be making inroads while at university, I know for a fact that I am disadvantaged against those that got those placement years, that got their names of a couple of papers and knew what they wanted so could move through the pathway with more ease. Focusing on getting into university and getting a good classification is the number one priority, but unfortunately, it is no longer the only one.
Thank you both! I completely understand that it is a very long process and it's nowhere near easy, probably a pipe dream but it's something I've been set on. I agree with staying here and becoming qualified, and then seeing how to go about it; but mostly focusing on A levels and getting into uni.
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