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treenyc
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Hi

I've got an interview for medicine at Durham uni in a week and they've changed to MMI this year. Anyone have any experience of these kinds of interviews? I'm expecting done kind of role play scenario but don't really know what to expect. I'm so nervous! Would appreciate any help
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The Medic Portal
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Hi there,

Well done for getting an interview at Durham!

The MMI format is a four-station system at Durham. You'll spend exactly 7 minutes at each station, and you'll have one minute of preparation time between each station. We'd recommend that firstly, you get use to working under these time frames. Think about potential questions/scenarios at MMI stations, and try prepping an answer in 1 minute.

Often MMI stations consist of various ethical scenarios involving an actor - for instance, you may be asked to break bad news, or extract information from a patient. Make sure you brush up on the four pillars of medical ethics!

As well as this, another form of MMI station could be that you are given a sheet of data, and you are asked to analyse it. Try looking up example Medicine interview data analysis questions to help get your brain in gear for the real thing.

Also, MMI stations sometimes comprise the more traditional style interview questions. So don't forget to practice answering these style of questions like "why do you want to study Medicine?" and "why at this particular university?".

We've got a number of free blogs, written by real medical students, such as this one on MMIs - feel free to have a browse!

We also have this page on our website on MMI interviews, and a free interview question bank with general mock questions and answers.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
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temid
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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Hi there,

Well done for getting an interview at Durham!

The MMI format is a four-station system at Durham. You'll spend exactly 7 minutes at each station, and you'll have one minute of preparation time between each station. We'd recommend that firstly, you get use to working under these time frames. Think about potential questions/scenarios at MMI stations, and try prepping an answer in 1 minute.

Often MMI stations consist of various ethical scenarios involving an actor - for instance, you may be asked to break bad news, or extract information from a patient. Make sure you brush up on the four pillars of medical ethics!

As well as this, another form of MMI station could be that you are given a sheet of data, and you are asked to analyse it. Try looking up example Medicine interview data analysis questions to help get your brain in gear for the real thing.

Also, MMI stations sometimes comprise the more traditional style interview questions. So don't forget to practice answering these style of questions like "why do you want to study Medicine?" and "why at this particular university?".

We've got a number of free blogs, written by real medical students, such as this one on MMIs - feel free to have a browse!

We also have this page on our website on MMI interviews, and a free interview question bank with general mock questions and answers.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
Hi medic portal. I got an interview at Leicester and there are supposed to be Mimi stations regarding written communication and verbal communication. Do you have any idea of what these may entail.

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The Medic Portal
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Hi medic portal. I got an interview at Leicester and there are supposed to be Mimi stations regarding written communication and verbal communication. Do you have any idea of what these may entail.

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Good morning!

Just as a re-cap, on the Leicester Medical School website, it says there will be 8 MMI stations, covering:

- verbal communication
- written communication
- listening
- compassion, respect & dignity
- emotional intelligence
- problem solving
- motivation
- ethical judgement

A station testing your verbal communication could be one that simulates a situation in which you have to describe and object or a task to another person. For instance, you may have to describe something to someone who is visually impaired.

Another example could be: how would you try to teach someone (who's never used an inhaler before) how to use an inhaler, without having an inhaler in front of you?

A station testing your written communication could be one where you are asked to read an article, and answer a question on it. Or perhaps the station instructions will ask you to write an answer to an essay-style question.

It can vary significantly. and universities test written communication in different ways. As long as you practice formulating clear instructions or arguments in your head, you'll be able to show that you have good written communication skills, regardless of what the station may be.

It is important that you remember that Leicester Medical School have the right to test you in any way they see fit, so don't just revise the kind of situations we've suggested.Try and think outside of the box, and read up on all current Medical-related affairs, and medical ethics! This will get your brain in gear, and will therefore help you to think on your feet during your interview.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
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temid
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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Good morning!

Just as a re-cap, on the Leicester Medical School website, it says there will be 8 MMI stations, covering:

- verbal communication
- written communication
- listening
- compassion, respect & dignity
- emotional intelligence
- problem solving
- motivation
- ethical judgement

A station testing your verbal communication could be one that simulates a situation in which you have to describe and object or a task to another person. For instance, you may have to describe something to someone who is visually impaired.

Another example could be: how would you try to teach someone (who's never used an inhaler before) how to use an inhaler, without having an inhaler in front of you?

A station testing your written communication could be one where you are asked to read an article, and answer a question on it. Or perhaps the station instructions will ask you to write an answer to an essay-style question.

It can vary significantly. and universities test written communication in different ways. As long as you practice formulating clear instructions or arguments in your head, you'll be able to show that you have good written communication skills, regardless of what the station may be.

It is important that you remember that Leicester Medical School have the right to test you in any way they see fit, so don't just revise the kind of situations we've suggested.Try and think outside of the box, and read up on all current Medical-related affairs, and medical ethics! This will get your brain in gear, and will therefore help you to think on your feet during your interview.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
Thank you

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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Hi there,

Well done for getting an interview at Durham!

The MMI format is a four-station system at Durham. You'll spend exactly 7 minutes at each station, and you'll have one minute of preparation time between each station. We'd recommend that firstly, you get use to working under these time frames. Think about potential questions/scenarios at MMI stations, and try prepping an answer in 1 minute.

Often MMI stations consist of various ethical scenarios involving an actor - for instance, you may be asked to break bad news, or extract information from a patient. Make sure you brush up on the four pillars of medical ethics!

As well as this, another form of MMI station could be that you are given a sheet of data, and you are asked to analyse it. Try looking up example Medicine interview data analysis questions to help get your brain in gear for the real thing.

Also, MMI stations sometimes comprise the more traditional style interview questions. So don't forget to practice answering these style of questions like "why do you want to study Medicine?" and "why at this particular university?".

We've got a number of free blogs, written by real medical students, such as this one on MMIs - feel free to have a browse!

We also have this page on our website on MMI interviews, and a free interview question bank with general mock questions and answers.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
any tips on the MMI for Exeter?
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The Medic Portal
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Good morning,

Exeter have released the following information about the MMI process:

"Successful candidates at the initial application stage will be invited to a multiple mini interview which is designed to determine whether applicants have the non-academic qualities required to become a successful doctor. Examples include good communication skills, evidence of empathy and reflectiveness" (see here).

In this case, we would still recommend that you do know your GCSE Science and Maths syllabuses, and are up-to-date with your relevant A-level syllabuses! Also, still try to practice the more traditional questions about why you want to study Medicine, and why you chose Exeter university.

Regarding the specifics mentioned by Exeter, lots of stations are designed to assess your communication skills, like those testing how well you explain tasks to people (for instance, imagine how you'd explain the rules of naughts and crosses to someone who has never played it before), or your ability to break bad news to patients (for instance, how would you tell a patient that they have been diagnosed with a serious illness?).

An example station designed to test your empathy again could be one where you have to break bad news, or talk to someone who has experienced emotional pain or stress, or lost a close relative. We've actually got a free blog written by a doctor here on empathy, what it is and how you show it.

A station assessing your 'reflectiveness' could come in a number of forms. For instance it could be one talking about your work placements, what you learned and how well you reflected on your experiences, something like this: "at the GP, I saw a memorable case of a doctor breaking bad news to a patient, and I learnt the importance of body language, empathy, and the building of relationships in a medical career". Remember to use your own experiences and try to genuinely reflect on what you saw!

Check out our free MMI information, and free question bank for some more ideas. Remember, don't just revise what is written in this post. Every university holds interviews and MMIs in different ways.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Good morning,

Exeter have released the following information about the MMI process:

"Successful candidates at the initial application stage will be invited to a multiple mini interview which is designed to determine whether applicants have the non-academic qualities required to become a successful doctor. Examples include good communication skills, evidence of empathy and reflectiveness" (see here).

In this case, we would still recommend that you do know your GCSE Science and Maths syllabuses, and are up-to-date with your relevant A-level syllabuses! Also, still try to practice the more traditional questions about why you want to study Medicine, and why you chose Exeter university.

Regarding the specifics mentioned by Exeter, lots of stations are designed to assess your communication skills, like those testing how well you explain tasks to people (for instance, imagine how you'd explain the rules of naughts and crosses to someone who has never played it before), or your ability to break bad news to patients (for instance, how would you tell a patient that they have been diagnosed with a serious illness?).

An example station designed to test your empathy again could be one where you have to break bad news, or talk to someone who has experienced emotional pain or stress, or lost a close relative. We've actually got a free blog written by a doctor here on empathy, what it is and how you show it.

A station assessing your 'reflectiveness' could come in a number of forms. For instance it could be one talking about your work placements, what you learned and how well you reflected on your experiences, something like this: "at the GP, I saw a memorable case of a doctor breaking bad news to a patient, and I learnt the importance of body language, empathy, and the building of relationships in a medical career". Remember to use your own experiences and try to genuinely reflect on what you saw!

Check out our free MMI information, and free question bank for some more ideas. Remember, don't just revise what is written in this post. Every university holds interviews and MMIs in different ways.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
Hi there, got an MMI for Queens belfast, any tips?
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J456
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We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal[/QUOTE]

Hi Medic Portal, would you possible be able to do the same for King's College London, mmi? Thank you
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(Original post by Ogarman)
Hi there, got an MMI for Queens belfast, any tips?
Hi there,

Queen's University Belfast (QUB) host a nine-station MMI (with some rest stations as well) designed to assess 'non-cognitive' qualities (like ethics, logical reasoning, personality traits etc - i.e. non academic).

Specifically, the stations are designed to assess the following:
- personal statement
- empathy (see our free blog on empathy here!)
- problem solving
- moral reasoning
- communication skills

(if you want some practice questions on these topics, see our free question bank with worked answers here!)

You'll have one minute preparation time before each station, and 5 minutes at the stations. So, we'd recommend practising with these time-frames in mind. So make sure you get used to formulating answers in a minute, and talking coherently for five minutes!

Now, each station will not focus on just one of these points, but will be designed to assess multiple. On the QUB website, there is an example station:

"Your mother rings you and asks you to come round and help with a major family decision. Her 70 year old father has been diagnosed with a condition that will kill him sometime in the next five years. He can have a procedure that will correct the disease and not leave him with any long term problems, but the procedure has a 10% mortality rate. He wants to have the procedure but your mother is not in favour of it. How would you help mediate this issue?"

This station is designed to assess problem solving, communication skills and ethical reasoning. There is also a video about the interview day on the same page (the QUB website), and another example station for you to practise with.

A great way to answer any question is to briefly outline what you are going to say first. Then go on to answer the question. Doing this will help you to form a check-list in your head of what you want to say, and will also help the interviewer to follow your points!

Also, be sure to brush up on the four pillars of medical ethics! These will help you think of both 'for' and 'against' arguments for many scenarios.

We hope this helps, good luck!

The Medic Portal
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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Hi there,

Well done for getting an interview at Durham!

The MMI format is a four-station system at Durham. You'll spend exactly 7 minutes at each station, and you'll have one minute of preparation time between each station. We'd recommend that firstly, you get use to working under these time frames. Think about potential questions/scenarios at MMI stations, and try prepping an answer in 1 minute.

Often MMI stations consist of various ethical scenarios involving an actor - for instance, you may be asked to break bad news, or extract information from a patient. Make sure you brush up on the four pillars of medical ethics!

As well as this, another form of MMI station could be that you are given a sheet of data, and you are asked to analyse it. Try looking up example Medicine interview data analysis questions to help get your brain in gear for the real thing.

Also, MMI stations sometimes comprise the more traditional style interview questions. So don't forget to practice answering these style of questions like "why do you want to study Medicine?" and "why at this particular university?".

We've got a number of free blogs, written by real medical students, such as this one on MMIs - feel free to have a browse!

We also have this page on our website on MMI interviews, and a free interview question bank with general mock questions and answers.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
Thanks this is helpful
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medicapplicant
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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Hi there,

Queen's University Belfast (QUB) host a nine-station MMI (with some rest stations as well) designed to assess 'non-cognitive' qualities (like ethics, logical reasoning, personality traits etc - i.e. non academic).

Specifically, the stations are designed to assess the following:
- personal statement
- empathy (see our free blog on empathy here!)
- problem solving
- moral reasoning
- communication skills

(if you want some practice questions on these topics, see our free question bank with worked answers here!)

You'll have one minute preparation time before each station, and 5 minutes at the stations. So, we'd recommend practising with these time-frames in mind. So make sure you get used to formulating answers in a minute, and talking coherently for five minutes!

Now, each station will not focus on just one of these points, but will be designed to assess multiple. On the QUB website, there is an example station:

"Your mother rings you and asks you to come round and help with a major family decision. Her 70 year old father has been diagnosed with a condition that will kill him sometime in the next five years. He can have a procedure that will correct the disease and not leave him with any long term problems, but the procedure has a 10% mortality rate. He wants to have the procedure but your mother is not in favour of it. How would you help mediate this issue?"

This station is designed to assess problem solving, communication skills and ethical reasoning. There is also a video about the interview day on the same page (the QUB website), and another example station for you to practise with.

A great way to answer any question is to briefly outline what you are going to say first. Then go on to answer the question. Doing this will help you to form a check-list in your head of what you want to say, and will also help the interviewer to follow your points!

Also, be sure to brush up on the four pillars of medical ethics! These will help you think of both 'for' and 'against' arguments for many scenarios.

We hope this helps, good luck!

The Medic Portal
Hi, do you have any tips for manchester and st georges mmi
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The Medic Portal
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(Original post by medicapplicant)
Hi, do you have any tips for manchester and st georges mmi
Hello there!

Of course we have tips for your MMIs! General MMI tips will certainly help you at any MMI for any university. Here is a free blog here with our top MMI tips for some general revision.

Specifically for Manchester, the website goes into quite a lot of detail - click here, and scroll down to the sections entitled 'The Interview' and 'What will the interview involve?'

The Medical School says that the following will be assessed in the MMI stations:

- details in your non-academic information form or personal statement;
- motivation to study medicine as a career;
- communication;
- problem solving;
- capacity for self-reflection;
- capacity for logical thinking;
- understanding of professional responsibility;
- capacity for team working;
- ability to discuss issues of a wider nature in the field of medicine;

So, don't forget to revise everything to do with empathy and medical careers (see our free blog) and the four pillars of medical ethics (see our website here).

Feel free to see our free interview question bank for example questions and answers!

For St. George's MMIs, there is very little information on the website here, but it does mention that you'll need to be able to talk about your work experience, and how you reflected what you saw or learned.

In general, St. George's may have around 7 or 8 stations (found on this webpage), again focusing on similar topics to above.

Above all - you must make sure that you practice thinking of answers in around one minute. You then need to be able to speak and discuss your answer for around five minutes or so (it even could be longer by a minute or two!).

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
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(Original post by Matureuser)
Hi, any help with Sheffield MMI? Its quite new and not much on their website
Hi there,

According to information we have on Sheffield Medical School and MMIs, there will be eight stations, each lasting eight minutes long. You will probably have around one minute (although as the one minute prep time isn't specified on the website, this is based on what other universities set) between each station. So, ideally, you should practice thinking of answers in around one minute, and practice talking for 8 minutes! Remember to get used thinking under these time-frames.

Now, the stations will cover the following (remember that a station can assess more than one attribute at the same time):

- communication skills
- depth & breadth of interests (achievements in specific fields)
- evidence of commitment for caring
- knowledge of and interest in study in Sheffield
- medical work experience
- medical work experience
- motivation for Medicine
- understanding the nature of Medicine
- values and attitudes.

It is also suggested:
"Whilst you will not be questioned on every aspect in your Personal Statement you can expect to be asked about topics or areas that you have mentioned. You can also prepare by reading the NHS Constitution, the General Medical Council's publication Good Medical Practice, and by keeping up to date with recent medical breakthroughs, topical controversies, ethical issues and NHS politics"

And finally, make sure you are aware of core values that are required by the NHS:

-" Working together for patients, putting the needs of patients and communities first and speaking up when things go wrong.

- Respect and dignity, valuing every person - whether patient, their families or carers, or staff - as an individual and taking what others have to say seriously.

-Commitment to quality of care, earning the trust placed in the profession by insisting on quality and striving to get the basics of quality of care - safety, effectiveness and patient experience - right every time.

-Compassion, ensuring that compassion is central to the care provided and respond with humanity and kindness to each person's pain, distress, anxiety or need. We search for the things we can do, however small, to give comfort and relieve suffering. We find time for patients, their families and carers, as well as those we work alongside.

-Improving lives, striving to improve health and wellbeing and people's experiences of the NHS. We cherish excellence and professionalism wherever we find it - in the everyday things that make people's lives better as much as in clinical practice, service improvements and innovation.

-Everyone counts, maximising resources for the benefit of the whole community, and making sure nobody is excluded, discriminated against or left behind."

All this information was found on this page on the Sheffield website.

Finally, check out the free information on MMIs here on our website, and the free interview question bank.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
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(Original post by Lostalltime)
Hi, do you have any tips for an mmi at Bristol uni?

Thanks
Hi there,

There isn't much material on the Bristol MMIs online. On the Bristol Medical School website it says the MMI circuit will last around an hour - so perhaps set yourself some mocks lasting this amount of time! (see this webpage on the Bristol website)

As general advice, see what's been written in the posts above. Most MMIs at different universities aim to assess the same things, so all the above tips should help you prepare!

Good luck,

The Medic Portal
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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Hi there,

There isn't much material on the Bristol MMIs online. On the Bristol Medical School website it says the MMI circuit will last around an hour - so perhaps set yourself some mocks lasting this amount of time! (see this webpage on the Bristol website)

As general advice, see what's been written in the posts above. Most MMIs at different universities aim to assess the same things, so all the above tips should help you prepare!

Good luck,

The Medic Portal
I have kings in January but not 100% on the type of things they could ask and the stations they have. Any ideas? Thanks


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The Medic Portal
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I have kings in January but not 100% on the type of things they could ask and the stations they have. Any ideas? ThanksPosted from TSR Mobile
Hi! Well done on getting an interview!

See the thread about KCL Medicine applicants which has lots of Q&As that you might find useful. You should be able to find our post about MMIs on it here!

Here is our post copied and pasted from the thread:
(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Hello!

As we're sure you know, KCL Medicine interviews are in the MMI format.In order to prepare for this style of interview, an important thing to start doing is to practice forming answers to mock questions under short time-frames. You may only have a minute before each MMI station to prepare your answers!

Different stations tend to focus on different aspects, so be sure to do a little research - perhaps Google search interview questions based around the following:

-You could be presented with a set of instructions that describe a situation involving an ethical scenario, which you will then be asked to discuss or try and solve.

-You could be given a scenario involving an actor - for example, you might have to break some bad news to them or gather specific information.

-You may be given a task involving teamwork with other applicants.

-There might be a station where you are asked a traditional interview question or given a reading comprehension exercise. So don't forget to practice the more traditional style questions like "biggest problems facing the NHS", "why you want to study Medicine" and "why you chose KCL" etc.

-You could be given a sheet of data and asked to provide analysis of it - so be sure to be up-to-date on your science/maths syllabuses, and do some practice data-interpretation of graphs! Perhaps ask your biology teachers for some mocks!

There could also be stations on other topics, so don't just focus on the topics listed above.

Remember to also stay up to date with the latest medical news. For instance, see the BBC news health section, NHS news articles and other general articles on the NHS (see this BBC search on NHS articles).

Also, Google search 'Richard Lehman's Weekly Review'. Dr Lehman is a retired GP who writes funny reviews of the latest and most interesting medical journals/papers (you can check them out here).

We've also got a free blog here covering some general top tips for MMI preparation!
Also, have a look through the advice given to others on this MMI thread. Lots of it will be useful for you!

Good luck!

The Medic Portal
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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Hi there,

There isn't much material on the Bristol MMIs online. On the Bristol Medical School website it says the MMI circuit will last around an hour - so perhaps set yourself some mocks lasting this
amount of time! (see this webpage on the Bristol website) As general advice, see what's been written in the posts above. Most MMIs at different universities aim to assess the same things, so all the above tips should help you prepare!

Good luck,

The Medic Portal
Hi there, I have an interview at Leicester and I've been told by friends that the calculation station is very difficult. I didn't do maths for a level so I'm a bit worried. Any tips?
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Any advice for Lancaster interviews??


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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
Hi there,

Well done for getting an interview at Durham!

The MMI format is a four-station system at Durham. You'll spend exactly 7 minutes at each station, and you'll have one minute of preparation time between each station. We'd recommend that firstly, you get use to working under these time frames. Think about potential questions/scenarios at MMI stations, and try prepping an answer in 1 minute.

Often MMI stations consist of various ethical scenarios involving an actor - for instance, you may be asked to break bad news, or extract information from a patient. Make sure you brush up on the four pillars of medical ethics!

As well as this, another form of MMI station could be that you are given a sheet of data, and you are asked to analyse it. Try looking up example Medicine interview data analysis questions to help get your brain in gear for the real thing.

Also, MMI stations sometimes comprise the more traditional style interview questions. So don't forget to practice answering these style of questions like "why do you want to study Medicine?" and "why at this particular university?".

We've got a number of free blogs, written by real medical students, such as this one on MMIs - feel free to have a browse!

We also have this page on our website on MMI interviews, and a free interview question bank with general mock questions and answers.

We hope this helps,

The Medic Portal
Hello, I have received an interview invite at Aberdeen and was wondering whether you have any additional advice/information other than what is offered in the University's website.

Many thanks for considering my request.
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