Dosage Calculations Watch

AndyC123
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I was wondering if anybody had a good link for where I could practice dosage calculations? I am trying to prepare for MMI interviews for medicine.

Many websites I have found are catered at nurses and require prior knowledge on drug levels. Are there any that lay it out more like an interview would?

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated!
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Beska
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(Original post by AndyC123)
I was wondering if anybody had a good link for where I could practice dosage calculations? I am trying to prepare for MMI interviews for medicine.

Many websites I have found are catered at nurses and require prior knowledge on drug levels. Are there any that lay it out more like an interview would?

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated!
Interviews now require you to do drug calculations?!!
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AndyC123
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(Original post by Beska)
Interviews now require you to do drug calculations?!!
I believe it's a way of doing data analysis.

They'd provide you with a chunk of information on things like dosage:solution and dosage:weight ratios and then expect you to calculate the dosage required for a patient of particular age/gender/weight.
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Ghotay
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(Original post by Beska)
Interviews now require you to do drug calculations?!!
I had an MMI with a drug calculation station 4 years ago!
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Beska
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That's ridiculous, that's effectively testing mathematical ability - talk about overexamination. Are they going to expect you to fill in the blanks in a diagram of oxidative phosphorylation or make a diagnosis from a case vignette next? They test your mathematical ability at GCSE, at AS level, at A2 level, with the UKCAT and then again by asking you to do some maths at your interview? What's the point. Any evidence for this being a useful indicator up and above the other exams?
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thegodofgod
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(Original post by Beska)
That's ridiculous, that's effectively testing mathematical ability - talk about overexamination. Are they going to expect you to fill in the blanks in a diagram of oxidative phosphorylation or make a diagnosis from a case vignette next? They test your mathematical ability at GCSE, at AS level, at A2 level, with the UKCAT and then again by asking you to do some maths at your interview? What's the point. Any evidence for this being a useful indicator up and above the other exams?
Although not medicine, they do have basic dose calculation questions in pharmacy interviews at Brighton, usually simple arithmetic questions like 'how much of ibuprofen would a patient take in a day in grams, if they were taking 400 mg of ibuprofen three times a day?

Simple stuff like basic multiplication, and then unit conversion, which doesn't require any previous pharmaceutical knowledge.
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Tanishqa
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(Original post by AndyC123)
I was wondering if anybody had a good link for where I could practice dosage calculations? I am trying to prepare for MMI interviews for medicine.

Many websites I have found are catered at nurses and require prior knowledge on drug levels. Are there any that lay it out more like an interview would?

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated!
I've been looking for this too! Let me know of you find any website that explains dosage calculations well.

Posted from TSR Mobile
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*pitseleh*
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(Original post by thegodofgod)
Although not medicine, they do have basic dose calculation questions in pharmacy interviews at Brighton, usually simple arithmetic questions like 'how much of ibuprofen would a patient take in a day in grams, if they were taking 400 mg of ibuprofen three times a day?

Simple stuff like basic multiplication, and then unit conversion, which doesn't require any previous pharmaceutical knowledge.
I assumed that dosage calculations formed a more significant part of your course than they do for ours, though.. at least, the pharmacy students and recently-qualified pharmacists I've met always seem to be much more switched on with that side of things than medical students and recently-qualified doctors I know.

I don't know what it's like for other medical schools, but for us, calculating dosages and learning how to write prescriptions is more or less self-taught, usually some time in the months before the Prescribing Skills Assessment.
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thegodofgod
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(Original post by *pitseleh*)
I assumed that dosage calculations formed a more significant part of your course than they do for ours, though.. at least, the pharmacy students and recently-qualified pharmacists I've met always seem to be much more switched on with that side of things than medical students and recently-qualified doctors I know.

I don't know what it's like for other medical schools, but for us, calculating dosages and learning how to write prescriptions is more or less self-taught, usually some time in the months before the Prescribing Skills Assessment.
Yeah, you're right in the sense that calculation-skills are probably more important in pharmacy (e.g. we have a calculations-based paper each year at Brighton, which becomes increasingly difficult as you progress through the course, and counts for 40% of one of the modules). The calculations bit is mainly self-taught at Brighton too. At least at applicant-level, I suppose that the ability to apply basic arithmetic skills to unknown situations is important.

The pharmacist pre-registration exam contains a clinical knowledge component and a calculations-based component (which I believe was non-calculator up until recently), you need to achieve at least 70% in both components in order to pass the registration assessment overall. So even if you ace the clinical knowledge component but get 69% in the calculations bit, you have to resit the whole exam.

Not sure whether there's a similar sort of thing for medics.
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The Medic Portal
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We know this thread is from last year, but just in case any visitors here are looking for resources - we've published a few blogs on MMI Calculation and Data Interpretation stations:

- MMI Stations: Calculation and Data Interpretation
- How to do drug calculations

Hope these are helpful!
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RedPanda114
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(Original post by The Medic Portal)
We know this thread is from last year, but just in case any visitors here are looking for resources - we've published a few blogs on MMI Calculation and Data Interpretation stations:

- MMI Stations: Calculation and Data Interpretation
- How to do drug calculations

Hope these are helpful!
Thank you <3
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