Graduate entry medicine - no science A levels? Watch

1468917
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Warwick is the only place I've seen so far that do not take A levels into consideration.

Does anybody know of any other places that do not care for A levels in terms of graduate medicine?

I understand that taking biology and chemistry is almost vital - but if Warwick can offer it without A levels, perhaps there are other places?

I still have a few years to go, but was wondering if anybody could help me.

Also, is there anybody who studies graduate medicine and can share their experience?

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Quilverine
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You would be okay with the GAMSAT unis too; Swansea, SGUL and Notts. You would need to learn science to first year uni level to get the minimum score required in the science section of that exam. It might be possible to scrape a 50 or 55 with A level knowledge though. Have you already started a degree? It's best to avoid grad entry if you know you want to be a doctor before starting further education.

Edit: Newcastle also don't go by A levels
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Democracy
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(Original post by Captivated)
Warwick is the only place I've seen so far that do not take A levels into consideration.

Does anybody know of any other places that do not care for A levels in terms of graduate medicine?

I understand that taking biology and chemistry is almost vital - but if Warwick can offer it without A levels, perhaps there are other places?

I still have a few years to go, but was wondering if anybody could help me.

Also, is there anybody who studies graduate medicine and can share their experience?

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What's your degree in?

There are a few GEPs which will accept non-life sciences grads and also don't take A levels into account. Warwick and Newcastle for sure...then probably two of the GAMSAT schools e.g. SGUL and Notts.

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...dicine-a-guide
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*pitseleh*
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King's didn't used to care about A-level subjects and neither did Newcastle, but I vaguely recall hearing that at least one of them might have changed their requirements since I applied five years ago..
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Quilverine
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(Original post by *pitseleh*)
King's didn't used to care about A-level subjects and neither did Newcastle, but I vaguely recall hearing that at least one of them might have changed their requirements since I applied five years ago..
Kings now want a lab Science degree, professional degrees or soft sciences need not apply.
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*pitseleh*
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(Original post by Quilverine)
Kings now want a lab Science degree, professional degrees or soft sciences need not apply.
Yeah, thought I'd heard that they'd changed their requirements somewhere. Thanks!
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trustmeimlying1
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(Original post by Quilverine)
You would be okay with the GAMSAT unis too; Swansea, SGUL and Notts. You would need to learn science to first year uni level to get the minimum score required in the science section of that exam. It might be possible to scrape a 50 or 55 with A level knowledge though. Have you already started a degree? It's best to avoid grad entry if you know you want to be a doctor before starting further education.

Edit: Newcastle also don't go by A levels
why yeh say that?

(Original post by *pitseleh*)
Yeah, thought I'd heard that they'd changed their requirements somewhere. Thanks!
jaysus tad unfair
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1468917
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(Original post by Quilverine)
You would be okay with the GAMSAT unis too; Swansea, SGUL and Notts. You would need to learn science to first year uni level to get the minimum score required in the science section of that exam. It might be possible to scrape a 50 or 55 with A level knowledge though. Have you already started a degree? It's best to avoid grad entry if you know you want to be a doctor before starting further education.

Edit: Newcastle also don't go by A levels
Thank you for this. I have started my degree but it's something I've always wanted to study (Psychology) - and I wanted to do GEM after it. I didn't do any science A levels so that's why I was a bit concerned.

I was confused about Notts because on their 5 year degree https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/ugstudy...-medicine.aspx it says "Graduates: 2:1 degree in a science-related subject; A in chemistry and biology at A level; third A level at grade A in any subject except general studies and critical thinking."

But then on their GEM degree page https://www.nottingham.ac.uk/medicin...q/a101faq.aspx it says
Minimum entry requirement for GEM is:
  • 2:2 Bachelor Honours degree in any subject discipline - a higher degree (Masters/PhD) will be accepted in lieu of a first degree.
  • Sit our entrance examination (GAMSAT) – this score will be used to select for interview.
  • Attend an interview.
  • Paid or voluntary work experience in a health-care related setting and you will be invited to talk about this at interview stage.
(NB: A level grades not required)
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1468917
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(Original post by Democracy)
What's your degree in?

There are a few GEPs which will accept non-life sciences grads and also don't take A levels into account. Warwick and Newcastle for sure...then probably two of the GAMSAT schools e.g. SGUL and Notts.

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/cont...dicine-a-guide
I'm currently studying Psychology.

I posted my confusion about Nottingham in my post just above this, wondering if you could clear that up?
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wl1
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(Original post by Captivated)
I'm currently studying Psychology.

I posted my confusion about Nottingham in my post just above this, wondering if you could clear that up?
Graduates applying to the 5 year A100 course need the science A-Levels. Those applying to the 4 year A101 GEP do not.
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(Original post by wl1)
Graduates applying to the 5 year A100 course need the science A-Levels. Those applying to the 4 year A101 GEP do not.
Is there a massive difference between the 5 and 4 year course though, besides the fact that you're learning something in a smaller timescale with the 4 yrs?
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wl1
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(Original post by Captivated)
Is there a massive difference between the 5 and 4 year course though, besides the fact that you're learning something in a smaller timescale with the 4 yrs?
If we are still talking about Notts, then I believe the first 18 months of the A101 course based in Derby, whilst the first two years of the A100 course is based in Nottingham.
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Quilverine
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(Original post by Captivated)
Is there a massive difference between the 5 and 4 year course though, besides the fact that you're learning something in a smaller timescale with the 4 yrs?
No. 1 is the price. No tuition fee loan for grads on the 5 year so you'll need to self fund 36k, NHS bursary covers the final year only. You only need to have 3.5k up front for the 4 years, loans and bursary cover the rest.

No.2 the 4 year assumes a certain level of degree level competence. You won't get generic modules that ease you into level 4/5/6 study. Some miss a lot of the basic science content so they only take students with previous science degrees.

No. 3 with the exception of Swansea and Warwick the GEM students join the traditional entry students in year 3 (year 2 for grads) so you'll be going from a very small tutor group of between 20-40 into one of several hundred.

No.4 your peers, the GEM applicants come from super diverse backgrounds and age between 22ish to 50s at some places. The A100 courses are predominantly school leavers, some take gap years but most will be starting as late teens or early 20s.

Ultimately though, it's the same basic curriculum, both are currently valid for provisional GMC registration. However, there's some EU legislation looming that might mean medical degrees require a minimum number of hours that would render 4 year accelerated degrees impossible. At the moment the UK gets by because F1 is counted as training - the GMC registration is provisional.
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1468917
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(Original post by Quilverine)
No. 1 is the price. No tuition fee loan for grads on the 5 year so you'll need to self fund 36k, NHS bursary covers the final year only. You only need to have 3.5k up front for the 4 years, loans and bursary cover the rest.

No.2 the 4 year assumes a certain level of degree level competence. You won't get generic modules that ease you into level 4/5/6 study. Some miss a lot of the basic science content so they only take students with previous science degrees.

No. 3 with the exception of Swansea and Warwick the GEM students join the traditional entry students in year 3 (year 2 for grads) so you'll be going from a very small tutor group of between 20-40 into one of several hundred.

No.4 your peers, the GEM applicants come from super diverse backgrounds and age between 22ish to 50s at some places. The A100 courses are predominantly school leavers, some take gap years but most will be starting as late teens or early 20s.

Ultimately though, it's the same basic curriculum, both are currently valid for provisional GMC registration. However, there's some EU legislation looming that might mean medical degrees require a minimum number of hours that would render 4 year accelerated degrees impossible. At the moment the UK gets by because F1 is counted as training - the GMC registration is provisional.
Thank you! This was really helpful

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Scott19901
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Hi,I feel your pain in regards to this question cause it really isn’t clear at times. Ive found 6 universities who would consider me based on the lack of A levels, I have a BSc, MSc and am currently studying a PhD in clinical science (renal disease) but some universities won’t consider you without the A levels but I don’t feel this should stop you. The reality is that if you can pass the GAMSAT you have the foundation necessary. You can lose your head thinking about your lack of this and that but I’ve delt with it by understanding that with a degree you are elegible for medicine (albeit only a few) and if you put all your effort into the exams then you stand a great chance. Psychology may not teach you lots on chemistry but last time I checked psychology is critical to patient care and modern medicine which people who have only studied chemistry biology etc would struggle with. So play to your strengths and don’t stress with this question, prep for the exams and do as well as you can and you will get in I’m sure. I will let you know if this works for me . Good luck and don’t give up.Scott
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