Can anyone suggest a more practical career path for me? Watch

jordanjames462
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I'm 20 years old and I do not know what direction to go in.When I was 18, I started studying a three year BA course in History.


I have now completed one year of that but that one year was not something I enjoyed. So instead, I decided to take a year out to figure out what I want to do. I am able to go back to the university I was originally at to continue my studies, so I have that to fall back onto just in case.However, I really do not want to go back there, mainly because I was extremely unhappy there. When I was there I started getting treatment for depression and going back might bring back those feelings again. I also much prefer the idea of studying in Europe, I feel like I would be a lot happier there. I'm always happier when I'm not in Britain. Plus, depending on which country I go to, I can get my education for free (as opposed to the extortionate British university prices).


The idea of me going to university has always been something that has been expected of me by both my family and my school, while all of my friends are at university too. So I've never really considered any alternatives up until now. What I struggle with is the sense of accomplishment and achievement, which seems much less tangible when it is all in your head or on a piece of paper. It feels like I miss the feeling of working hard because I never physically exert myself and I am not good at mentally exerting myself. I used to be able to work hard academically at school but it feels like I've had enough and I lack the energy. I want something real, not something as abstract as an essay.


So I like the idea of a more practical job. This is also more appealing because there is a clearer career direction. For example, if I were to train to be a nurse it is quite clear that the job I would have afterwards is a nursing job. It is also a job that is in demand, so the job prospects are very. But there is no clear direction for someone with a History degree.I don't feel like my education so far is sufficient for a training like this though. For example, to be a nurse, I'm guessing you would need good grades in science from school. My grades in science were mediocre. I've also thought about being a pilot but I'm guessing you would need good grades in maths from school. My grades in maths were poor.


So does anyone have any insight into the training of more practical jobs? Do your grades always matter? Does anyone have a job they would recommend?Does anyone have any suggestions on jobs based on my character/strengths? -


I have very good grades from school in History, English and Philosophy; I have mediocre grades in German and Biology; I have a good knowledge of Swedish and German (I understand both languages perfectly); My father always says I have a good understanding of a person's character; I like the idea of helping others; I like the idea of earning money, rather than putting myself in debt because of university; I am very calm, I rarely loose my cool; I have a particular interest in designs of logos and heraldry; I also have interests in film, television and photography but have very little knowledge of the expertise behind it
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shawn_o1
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Do charity work in Germany or Sweden then, it might lead you to a good job opportunity (+ the ability to speak a language fluently)
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whydoidothis?
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what are your a levels like there are plenty of apprenticeship schemes. But some nursing courses only need the equivalent of BBC with a C in a level biology.
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CCC75
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The first thing that springs to my mind is that you may find your calling in a translation support service. Do a google search of those in your locality. Approach them with your CV stating that you are taking a study break to gather work experience in order to guide your career path.

Do a vacancy search based on your interests too. Particularly regarding translation jobs, at entry level at least your GCSE maths and english grades aren't as important as your foreign language fluency.

I have worked with student and highly paid translators in court, care and general public services. There are also plenty of behind the scenes script translation jobs.
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jordanjames462
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(Original post by whydoidothis?)
what are your a levels like there are plenty of apprenticeship schemes. But some nursing courses only need the equivalent of BBC with a C in a level biology.
I didn't do A-levels, instead I did the European Baccalaureate. My overall mark is probably equivalent to a C, while the individual grade for biology is probably equivalent to a B.
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sabana
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If you enjoy working with children then teaching is great it's soo rewarding

I feel great when I help a pupil understand something plus you get to build great relationships with them.
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quasa
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graphic desgin fundamentals are straightforward (gcse and a-alevel are similar except the exams are 10 hours for gcse, 20 for a -levels - I did GCSE and got a B but nobody cared about it in my school and the teacher was never there so make of that what you will). photography (from an amateur phtorographer such as myself) is about modifying camera parameters such as shutter speed, brightness, contrast, iso (sensitivity to light), saturation, etc, etc. if you want to make a living out of it, just practice it and make submissions to different magazines. make sure to invest in a good camera, but start practice with a camera phone (high-end lumias are known for their picture quality, as well as xperia z5).
I did media studies as a GCSE and somehow got an E for it due to incompetence on my teacher's part (she lost all my coursework the old hag and made me sit the foundation exam, which I got a C in (which is the highest mark in that exam. that is the only foundation exam I have ever sat in my life!!!). but regarding film making / television, usually I would say gain experience in the industries and find out how to progress I guess. a lot of people nowadays use youtube as a launch platform(personally looking into it myself) I guess you would need to look into it (p.s. for media studies, 1 of the practical bits i did was make a sports film and it was so cringeworthy, it turned into sports blooper programme)
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jordanjames462
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(Original post by CCC75)
The first thing that springs to my mind is that you may find your calling in a translation support service. Do a google search of those in your locality. Approach them with your CV stating that you are taking a study break to gather work experience in order to guide your career path.

Do a vacancy search based on your interests too. Particularly regarding translation jobs, at entry level at least your GCSE maths and english grades aren't as important as your foreign language fluency.

I have worked with student and highly paid translators in court, care and general public services. There are also plenty of behind the scenes script translation jobs.
Would you need a degree if you wanted to have a career in this?
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jordanjames462
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(Original post by sabana)
If you enjoy working with children then teaching is great it's soo rewarding

I feel great when I help a pupil understand something plus you get to build great relationships with them.
I'm guessing you're a teacher? If so, I'm guessing you also have a university degree. What did you study?
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CCC75
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(Original post by jordanjames462)
Would you need a degree if you wanted to have a career in this?
Eventually you would reach a level of seniority where a degree will propel you more smoothly. But that's the same of any career. There is nothing to stop you gathering the work experience first then returning to complete your degree, maybe alongside some part time work in the field, but with a clearer idea of your career plans.
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sabana
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(Original post by jordanjames462)
I'm guessing you're a teacher? If so, I'm guessing you also have a university degree. What did you study?
Yes I am currently a trainee teacher. I studied Maths at university.
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whydoidothis?
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why don't you ask your uni explain the situation to them if you could move to a history with secondary education course or something like any teaching course. Your better off asking a teacher lol I'm just guessing, I know transfers are possible though. Have a chat with ur uni
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the bear
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with your language skills i would relocate to Sweden... life is still much better there than elsewhere in Europe.
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jordanjames462
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(Original post by the bear)
with your language skills i would relocate to Sweden... life is still much better there than elsewhere in Europe.
I am actually currently living in Sweden. It's so much better here. I really don't want to go back to England.
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