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Oxbridge Admissions Statistics watch

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    Seeing as people will need to decide on colleges, courses ect I thought it may be useful to some if I posted a few links where people could see the statistics for college or course.
    I don't want to put anyone off applying to x college to do y course because the "odds are against them" but it may give you a realistic idea of what to aim for. If you are set in your mind then I suggest you don't look as seeing statistics might put doubt into your mind!

    Oxford:
    Oxford admissions statistics (you need adobe reader for this)

    Cambridge
    Cambridge college statistics
    Cambridge subject statistics
    general cam statistics

    Hope this helps!

    Louise
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    if only they had subjects by college - thats the ones everyone REALLY wants!
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    (Original post by Willa)
    if only they had subjects by college - thats the ones everyone REALLY wants!
    Not sure why people want them, though - they're virtually useless.
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    There are good reasons why colleges do not make detailed statistics available. If people saw that a college was very undersubscribed one year for a subject, quite a lot of people would probably apply the next year, hoping for an easy place. It's really not much help.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    There are good reasons why colleges do not make detailed statistics available. If people saw that a college was very undersubscribed one year for a subject, quite a lot of people would probably apply the next year, hoping for an easy place. It's really not much help.
    Some colleges provide extremely detailed stats. I suspect a proper search through college websites may reveal quite a lot of relatively obscure information. At any rate, I'm not sure that argument is right - colleges would like nothing better than lots of applicants. Then they can take all the best ones and pack the rest off to other colleges.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    Some colleges provide extremely detailed stats. I suspect a proper search through college websites may reveal quite a lot of relatively obscure information. At any rate, I'm not sure that argument is right - colleges would like nothing better than lots of applicants. Then they can take all the best ones and pack the rest off to other colleges.
    Some colleges do provide detailed stats, but it's not generally approved of by the university. A look through the official prospectus will reveal relatively little...though of course, you could always try and find the information from elsewhere (including people working at the college).

    I'm not sure that colleges want loads of applicants. It means a lot of work for them to interview everyone, and the chances are that if most of the applicants are trying for an easy offer, they won't be of that high standard anyway.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    colleges would like nothing better than lots of applicants.
    But by that logic, when they publish the stats for the next year they will have a huge applicants per place ratio that will deter people. It just leads to silly cycles...
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    I'm not sure that colleges want loads of applicants. It means a lot of work for them to interview everyone
    Though you're far from the first person to say this, I don't buy it. I'd imagine most tutors would be willing to put in many extra hours to improve the quality of their students. It will actually save them work in the long run, as they won't have help struggling students; there's also the point about good students being more interesting to teach.
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    i guess all you need to do is wait and see when you get there - you'll easily find out how many people got offers in your subject at least - and you can work out roughly how many applicants there were from the interview procedure.
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    (Original post by grey faerie)
    But by that logic, when they publish the stats for the next year they will have a huge applicants per place ratio that will deter people. It just leads to silly cycles...
    I wasn't saying colleges want to publish stats to enhance their application numbers - just saying that the converse argument doesn't work.

    I think the main reason for colleges not publishing detailed admissions information is the university's support for a (false) image of very similar colleges. For many subjects, the raw numbers suggest it is much harder to get into certain colleges than others. This conclusion is probably incorrect (very high admissions ratios tend to be the result of very few places rather than very many applicants), but it is an easy one to make unless you know some quite detailed information.
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    In general, the university does want to promote the image that the colleges are equal because it's the fairest thing to do (not perhaps the right thing, but whatever). Stats tables, like it or not, do artificially create application trends, which the university doesn't want to be responsible for. It's up to colleges if they want to publish their own details, but in general, they only make passing references to numbers...rarely have I seen them publish full tables making it easy for people to select a college based on application figures.

    I don't know much about the logistics of interviewing, but I was told that the Oxbridge interview system was cracking under the strain of so many applicants last year, and in the future, they might not even interview all good applicants...just the very best ones. I just get the feeling colleges don't really want to increase their applicant numbers right now.
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    Please please please ignore the applicants per place statistics. The thing that nobody ever remembers is that they only tell you how many applied to each college. What they miss out is that after the applications, people who made open applications are then allocated to the colleges with fewer applicants, so it comes quite close to balancing out. Plus, there are enough differences between the colleges that you should be making your decision based on those, not based on the competition you think you'll be facing.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    In general, the university does want to promote the image that the colleges are equal because it's the fairest thing to do (not perhaps the right thing, but whatever). Stats tables, like it or not, do artificially create application trends, which the university doesn't want to be responsible for. It's up to colleges if they want to publish their own details, but in general, they only make passing references to numbers...rarely have I seen them publish full tables making it easy for people to select a college based on application figures.

    I don't know much about the logistics of interviewing, but I was told that the Oxbridge interview system was cracking under the strain of so many applicants last year, and in the future, they might not even interview all good applicants...just the very best ones. I just get the feeling colleges don't really want to increase their applicant numbers right now.
    I completely agree with the logic of your first point, I think the same myself. I'm having difficulty squaring that with the fact that the university does publish admissions statistics. Maybe they've concluded it's better to provide some official data rather than rely on hearsay.

    I'm similarly ignorant to you about interviewing; just where I was intereviewed they didn't seem to have much difficulty, got it all done in well under 24 hours despite having over 30 applicants. Furthermore, I was repeatedly told that the written work I was asked to send in should not be much longer than 2,000 words or the tutors will get bored of reading it/annoyed I was wasting their time. I sent in a 4,500 word essay, and so far as I can tell they were very impressed. Hence I'm sceptical. I'm probably being very parochial; it's just hard to avoid when there's so little hard evidence to go on.
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    (Original post by ThePants999)
    Please please please ignore the applicants per place statistics. The thing that nobody ever remembers is that they only tell you how many applied to each college. What they miss out is that after the applications, people who made open applications are then allocated to the colleges with fewer applicants, so it comes quite close to balancing out. Plus, there are enough differences between the colleges that you should be making your decision based on those, not based on the competition you think you'll be facing.
    The cambridge statistics split it up into open applications. pooled applicant ect. so you can clearly see which are the more popular colleges. And although you are not more likely to get in if you pick a less popular college you are more likely to get your first choice college if you picked a less popular college.
    I tried to explain the dangers associated with basing you decision it only on statistics but I know people often like to look at them to reasure them.

    And someone mentioned subject by college, oxford statistics are subject by college.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    I completely agree with the logic of your first point, I think the same myself. I'm having difficulty squaring that with the fact that the university does publish admissions statistics. Maybe they've concluded it's better to provide some official data rather than rely on hearsay.

    I'm similarly ignorant to you about interviewing; just where I was intereviewed they didn't seem to have much difficulty, got it all done in well under 24 hours despite having over 30 applicants. Furthermore, I was repeatedly told that the written work I was asked to send in should not be much longer than 2,000 words or the tutors will get bored of reading it/annoyed I was wasting their time. I sent in a 4,500 word essay, and so far as I can tell they were very impressed. Hence I'm sceptical. I'm probably being very parochial; it's just hard to avoid when there's so little hard evidence to go on.
    Yeah, I think they probably feel compelled to provide some figures. Numbers and stats are a Western obsession.

    Were you interviewed at Ox? I was under the impression all Ox applicants had to stay in the city for two or three days. My Cam interviewers sent me some stuff to read, saying we might have to refer to the material in the interview...when it came down to it, they only asked me one question on the material, and everything else was completely random. Sometimes it's very hard to understand what they're trying to do.
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    (Original post by Squishy)
    Yeah, I think they probably feel compelled to provide some figures. Numbers and stats are a Western obsession.

    Were you interviewed at Ox? I was under the impression all Ox applicants had to stay in the city for two or three days. My Cam interviewers sent me some stuff to read, saying we might have to refer to the material in the interview...when it came down to it, they only asked me one question on the material, and everything else was completely random. Sometimes it's very hard to understand what they're trying to do.
    I was interviewed at Ox. I was offered the choice of coming up night before or on the day (I chose the former, but a lot of people I spoke to chose the latter). Interviews started after lunch, were all done by about 6 o'clock (30+ applicants, two interviews each). Stayed the night, list of who could go home was up by 9 o'clock the next morning. Pooled applicants stayed on, obviously, but that was only about 3/4 of the 30. So interviewing took from about 1 o'clock Thursday to 9am Friday.
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    (Original post by grey faerie)
    But by that logic, when they publish the stats for the next year they will have a huge applicants per place ratio that will deter people. It just leads to silly cycles...
    Oxford avoid this by publishing statisitcs that are averaged over the last 5 years I think. It gives you a better impression.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    So interviewing took from about 1 o'clock Thursday to 9am Friday.
    Not bad...could've fitted three-quarters of a season of "24" into that.

    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    Oxford avoid this by publishing statisitcs that are averaged over the last 5 years I think. It gives you a better impression.
    Both universities normally average their figures over a few years.
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    (Original post by Louise_1988)
    Oxford avoid this by publishing statisitcs that are averaged over the last 5 years I think. It gives you a better impression.
    It's 3 years. But anyway, choosing college based on precise information is really difficult; for one thing, it's often very inaccurate. Much more important in my view is to try and get a feel for the place, talk to the students and/or tutors, in person if possible.
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    (Original post by H&E)
    It's 3 years. But anyway, choosing college based on precise information is really difficult; for one thing, it's often very inaccurate. Much more important in my view is to try and get a feel for the place, talk to the students and/or tutors, in person if possible.
    Yes I agree, and I think most people applying will be very aware of this but I know some people are interested in statistics and may find them reassuring. Also it may help someone put their desire to go to Oxford or Cambridge into perspictive, if they see that Law has a low acceptance rate they may feel that a course with a higher rate would give them a better chance. I know they are not everyone's cup of tea, but there are people who like them. I was only trying to save time for those people who would otherwise be searching through the web sites looking for them.
 
 
 
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