Do you believe exams are just a memory test?

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loveleest
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#1
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Do they test anything else other than your ability to memorise things?
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dean01234
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Depends at what level you're talking about.
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eoe
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not with mathematics but definitely when it comes to history
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HAnwar
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More than half the time yes.
The moment I walk out that exam hall, I've already forgotten everything.

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thecatwithnohat
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(Original post by eoe)
not with mathematics but definitely when it comes to history
I think this also applies to Mathematics, you need to learn the formulas and then be able to apply them to questions.

I think many subjects, particularly science subjects like Biology require the person to have the ability to regurgitate information well.

I'm basing this all on study below degree level, though.
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draculaura
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(Original post by loveleest)
Do they test anything else other than your ability to memorise things?
I do believe that - and that's why I find the education system wrong. They're not testing you on your mental skills or intelligence - just forcing you to cram useless information in and write out as much as you can remember in the form of questions and answers.
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Blackstarr
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Yes, GCSE history is a memory test because you have to memorise key dates such as when the ww2 started and how Hitler came into power and the cold war stuff.
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Student403
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(Original post by thecatwithnohat)
I think this also applied to Mathematics, you need to learn the formulas and then be able to apply them to questions.

I think many subjects, particularly science subjects like Biology require the person to have the ability to regurgitate information well.

I'm basing this all on study below degree level, though.
That's generally more applied to people who don't understand the maths and where it comes from.

If you understand where it comes from and how it's derived, you can go in without "memorising" more than a couple of things and you'll be fine.

That's the problem with GCSE maths and much lower level maths. Because they need to cater exams to much lower level candidates, it's more focused on the formulae and memorising them. Once you progress to higher levels, you're left mostly with the people who really understand it and so it actually becomes a lot simpler (in peoples' minds) when they understand the origins of things
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username2281303
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(Original post by loveleest)
Do they test anything else other than your ability to memorise things?
I think this applies to most subjects.
But not English.
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Student403
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To answer the question, it's completely dependent on your subject
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loveleest
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(Original post by dean01234)
Depends at what level you're talking about.
mainly gcse/a levels.
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Blackstarr
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Education does not equate to intelligence.
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username2151383
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in the sciences you have to apply your knowledge to different scenarios, so I guess that's good and there's not too many formulas
I heard that english exams are gonna become closed book? that's definitely a memory test and nothing more
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evalilyXOX
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(Original post by loveleest)
Do they test anything else other than your ability to memorise things?
On my degree course (law), I personally think the exams are just memory tests. Okay it is obviously great to be familiar with the law, but just because you know the Matrimonial Homes Act inside out, doesn't mean you will be a better lawyer than others. It is about helping those in need, through the law rather than being able to recite a statute under timed conditions.
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loveleest
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(Original post by Student403)
To answer the question, it's completely dependent on your subject
what subjects does it not test memory?
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loveleest
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(Original post by defenestrated)
in the sciences you have to apply your knowledge to different scenarios, so I guess that's good and there's not too many formulas
I heard that english exams are gonna become closed book? that's definitely a memory test and nothing more
Yeah, it's become closed book and I agree.
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Lawliettt
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(Original post by thecatwithnohat)
I think this also applies to Mathematics, you need to learn the formulas and then be able to apply them to questions.

I think many subjects, particularly science subjects like Biology require the person to have the ability to regurgitate information well.

I'm basing this all on study below degree level, though.
By that you mean you're basing it on below GCSE.

Maths is the last subject I'd relate to memorizing. Even at GCSE simply memorising formulas doesn't get you anywhere
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Ishan_2000
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(Original post by Blackstarr)
Education does not equate to intelligence.
Quote of the day

You may get high grades in GCSEs (don't know about A levels yet), but you are not 'intelligent'.

Tbh,it is difficult to test real 'intelligence', because to be 'intelligent' is subjective and comparative. To be deemed as intelligent, there must be someone less intelligent.

Same with the grading system at GCSE, (again, don't know about A levels yet). There has to be someone who is 'dumb' enough to get a G, and many people have to be at this level, for some people to get an A*. I don't like that. And I'm pretty sure not many people do like it.
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troubadour.
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(Original post by Student403)
Once you progress to higher levels, you're left mostly with the people who really understand it and so it actually becomes a lot simpler (in peoples' minds) when they understand the origins of things
Must... not... crack joke...
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Student403
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(Original post by loveleest)
what subjects does it not test memory?
Maths
Further Maths
Further Maths (additional)
Physics (to an extent)
[these are just subjects I take]

I'd assume Critical Thinking?

German and I guess other languages are the definition of memorising lol
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