InfantVenus1
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Explain fully titration experiment please common 6 marker!?
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robzpotter
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It's pretty much just the method of what u would do to titrate something
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langlitz
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(Original post by InfantVenus1)
Explain fully titration experiment please common 6 marker!?
In English?
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InfantVenus1
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(Original post by langlitz)
In English?
science chemistry
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InfantVenus1
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(Original post by robzpotter)
It's pretty much just the method of what u would do to titrate something
which is?
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Firenze26
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What level is this? Cause it might be a bit different for each level (GCSE, A-level, uni, etc)


P.S.

Sorry for the horrible grammar 😞
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robzpotter
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Yer that's what I was gonna say
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Dysprosium
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I'm not sure about the specific points in the 6 marker but in general,

The purpose of the experiment is to use a solution with a known concentration to find the unknown concentration of the other solution. It involves an acid & alkali, the known concentration (could be either acid or alkali) is placed in the burette and the other solution is placed in a glass beaker (using a pipette). You place a few drops of indicator in the flask such as 'Phenolphthalein' and the solution will go a certain colour like pink. Now you have your burette (say it is an alkali with known concentration) and you slowly start releasing the solution into the beaker until the acid is neutralised (it should go transparent) in which you immediately stop the burette from flowing and read the mark on the burette. It is best to repeat this experiment to find a mean titre (titre is basically volume used to neutralise) for accuracy.

Other Notes: An alkali is a base which forms OH- ions when dissolved in water whereas an acid is any species (ions/atoms/molecules/etc.) that is a proton donor (basically forms h+ ions when dissolved.- Make sure you write a balanced equation e.g. H2SO4 + 2NaOH > Na2SO4 + 2H20- Make sure all volumes are in dm^3 (cm^3 to dm^3 is x10^3)- Formulas to use: n = c x v
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therecovery
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(Original post by Dysprosium)
I'm not sure about the specific points in the 6 marker but in general,

The purpose of the experiment is to use a solution with a known concentration to find the unknown concentration of the other solution. It involves an acid & alkali, the known concentration (could be either acid or alkali) is placed in the burette and the other solution is placed in a glass beaker (using a pipette). You place a few drops of indicator in the flask such as 'Phenolphthalein' and the solution will go a certain colour like pink. Now you have your burette (say it is an alkali with known concentration) and you slowly start releasing the solution into the beaker until the acid is neutralised (it should go transparent) in which you immediately stop the burette from flowing and read the mark on the burette. It is best to repeat this experiment to find a mean titre (titre is basically volume used to neutralise) for accuracy.

Other Notes: An alkali is a base which forms OH- ions when dissolved in water whereas an acid is any species (ions/atoms/molecules/etc.) that is a proton donor (basically forms h+ ions when dissolved.- Make sure you write a balanced equation e.g. H2SO4 + 2NaOH > Na2SO4 + 2H20- Make sure all volumes are in dm^3 (cm^3 to dm^3 is x10^3)- Formulas to use: n = c x v
This is a good framework and covers most points, but hear are some points id like to add on:

There is no necessary condition that an acid should be specifically in a burette or an alkali should be specifically in a conical flask.
Remember:
Concentration unknown substance: Burette
Concentration known substance: conical flask

Its also good to know that the burette is rinsed with distilled water and then the solution it will contain (Concentration unknown substance) . The same is done with the pipette (Concentration known substance). However, we dont do the same with the conical flask. We only rinse the conical flask with distilled water. We dont rinse it with the concentration known substance because that would just increase the number of moles, which would lead to invalidity of results.

We use a pipette because we want a known volume of the concentration known substance. What we pipette will be transferred to the conical flask. Since we known both concentration and volume of the concentration known substance, we can find its moles.
Hence, finding the concentration of the concentration unknown substance will be a lot easier.

If you have doubts, please post.
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InfantVenus1
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(Original post by therecovery)
This is a good framework and covers most points, but hear are some points id like to add on:

There is no necessary condition that an acid should be specifically in a burette or an alkali should be specifically in a conical flask.
Remember:
Concentration unknown substance: Burette
Concentration known substance: conical flask

Its also good to know that the burette is rinsed with distilled water and then the solution it will contain (Concentration unknown substance) . The same is done with the pipette (Concentration known substance). However, we dont do the same with the conical flask. We only rinse the conical flask with distilled water. We dont rinse it with the concentration known substance because that would just increase the number of moles, which would lead to invalidity of results.

We use a pipette because we want a known volume of the concentration known substance. What we pipette will be transferred to the conical flask. Since we known both concentration and volume of the concentration known substance, we can find its moles.
Hence, finding the concentration of the concentration unknown substance will be a lot easier.

If you have doubts, please post.
Thanks
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charco
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(Original post by therecovery)
Remember:
Concentration unknown substance: Burette
Concentration known substance: conical flask

.
This is not necessarily the case.

The order is chosen to chosen according to both convenience and the colour change desired in the conical flask.

For example, in a phenolphthalein titration some peeps like to judge the first permanent tinge of pink while others prefer to see the colour completely discharged.

A dark coloured unknown solution (potassium manganate(VII)) which makes reading the burette difficult is better in the conical flask.
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