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    What is the BMAT?
    The BMAT (Biomedical Admissions Test) is a 2 hour examination required for entry to a number of Medical Schools in the United Kingdom, Singapore and Netherlands as well as a selection of Dentistry and Biomedical Science courses.

    When is the BMAT?
    All students take the BMAT examination on the same date. Traditionally, this is in the November prior to the year of entry (ie. If you intend to commence university in September 2017, you would sit the BMAT in November 2016). The BMAT 2016 date is 2nd November 2016, with results released on 25th November 2016.

    Who has to take the BMAT?

    Undergraduate Medicine Applicants to: University of Oxford, University of Cambridge, Imperial College London, University College London, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Lancaster University, University of Leeds, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine (Singapore), University of Malaya (Malaysia).

    Graduate Medicine Applicants to: University of Oxford, Imperial College London.

    Veterinary Medicine Applicants to: University of Cambridge.

    Biomedical Science Applicants to: University of Oxford, Imperial College London.

    Dentistry Applicants to: University of Leeds.


    How to Prepare for the BMAT?
    The first and most important step is to consider the BMAT like any other A-Level or GCSE examination, and ignore any mention of the BMAT as 'an examination that cannot be prepared for.' There is a statistically significant correlation between the amount one prepares for the BMAT, and one's BMAT score.

    Section 1 (Aptitude and Skills) - 35 MCQ, 60 Minutes
    Question Types: Problem Solving, Data Handling & Critical Thinking

    A) Resources - Make use of the abundance of free practice resources available for Section 1. In addition to the Official BMAT Past Papers, Oxford TSA Past Papers provide additional practice for Problem Solving questions whilst OCR Critical Thinking Unit 2 is a very useful practice resource for Critical Thinking Questions.

    B) Recognise Pitfalls - In contrast to most A-Level examinations, BMAT Section 1 is full of tricks and trips, intended to misguide students. Fortunately, there are only so-many tricks that the BMAT are able to use. Hence, each time you come across one of these, add it to your 'personal list', to avoid making the same mistake in future practice.


    Section 2 (Scientific Knowledge and Applications) - 27 MCQ, 30 Minutes
    Question Types: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics

    A) Official Resource Guide - With this being the official resource guide, there really is no better resource for Section 2 preparation. Most students find it best to quickly review the whole guide and highlight any topics which they have not covered at GCSE level for further learning. Bear in mind that whilst Section 2 is supposed to be 'GCSE Level'; the examination can assess topics which you may not have covered until AS and sometimes even A2 due to variation in exam board specifications.

    B) Timing - Half the challenge of Section 2 is the limited time; hence, it essential to practice this section under strict timed conditions. Fast mental maths, confident use of fractions and a good background Biology knowledge, will ensure that you have additional time for those challenging Physics and Chemistry calculations.

    C) Resources - Once you have completed all official and BMAT specific resources, GCSE Bitesize is of some use, whilst you may wish to also consider practicing GCSE Maths Calculator papers, without a calculator in order to further improve your mental maths.


    Section 3 (Written Task) - 1 Essay (Choice of 4), 30 Minutes
    Question Types: Topical Medical Issues, Medical Ethics, Medical Philosophy, Veterinary Medicine

    A) Address all parts of the question - Each question normally has three or four parts. Regardless of how good your essay is, if you do not address all parts of the question, your essay will be capped at 3/3.5 as per the Section 3 Official Marking Criteria.

    B) Plan - With 30 minutes, and one A4 sheet provided, this section is the least time restricted. Essays which score highest are those which are well structured and address all parts of the question, bringing in additional topical examples and knowledge.


    Free BMAT Resources
    A) Official BMAT Past Papers (Style 1)
    B) Official BMAT Past Papers (Style 2)
    C) Past Paper Worked Solutions
    D) Section 1 Practice Questions
    E) Section 2 Practice Questions
    F) Practice Questions


    Books
    A) Preparing for the BMAT: The Official Guide to the Biomedical Admissions Test
    B) Get into Medical School. 400 BMAT Practice Questions
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    Useful advice! Thanks
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    How many BMAT universities should I apply to?
    •  Official Rep
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     Official Rep
    (Original post by sm11adt)
    How many BMAT universities should I apply to?
    Hi there,

    Many people recommend just applying to 1 or 2 BMAT universities.

    The BMAT is sat after you've submitted your applications to the universities. Therefore, it could be risky to apply for 4 BMAT universities, because if you then sat the BMAT and performed badly in it, you would have potentially missed out on every university that you applied to.

    Check out our Medical School Comparison Tool. It's free and will help you compare universities and how/whether they use the UKCAT and BMAT.

    There is lots of free info on BMAT and UKCAT - just click on the hyperlinks

    We hope this helps,
    The Medic Portal
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    A friend on mine recommended going on 'The BMAT Course'........any experiences/advice?
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    The BMAT is no longer required for RVC
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    (Original post by rmd141)
    What is the BMAT?
    The BMAT (Biomedical Admissions Test) is a 2 hour examination required for entry to a number of Medical Schools in the United Kingdom, Singapore and Netherlands as well as a selection of Veterinary Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Science courses.

    When is the BMAT?
    All students take the BMAT examination on the same date. Traditionally, this is in the November prior to the year of entry (ie. If you intend to commence university in September 2017, you would sit the BMAT in November 2016). The BMAT 2016 date has yet to be released.

    Who has to take the BMAT?

    Undergraduate Medicine Applicants to: University of Oxford, University of Cambridge, Imperial College London, University College London, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Lancaster University, University of Leeds, Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine (Singapore).

    Graduate Medicine Applicants to: University of Oxford, Imperial College London.

    Veterinary Medicine Applicants to: Royal Veterinary College, University of Cambridge.

    Biomedical Science Applicants to: University of Oxford, Imperial College London.

    Dentistry Applicants to: University of Leeds.


    How to Prepare for the BMAT?
    The first and most important step is to consider the BMAT like any other A-Level or GCSE examination, and ignore any mention of the BMAT as 'an examination that cannot be prepared for.' There is a statistically significant correlation between the amount one prepares for the BMAT, and one's BMAT score.

    Section 1 (Aptitude and Skills) - 35 MCQ, 60 Minutes
    Question Types: Problem Solving, Data Handling & Critical Thinking

    A) Resources - Make use of the abundance of free practice resources available for Section 1. In addition to the Official BMAT Past Papers, Oxford TSA Past Papers provide additional practice for Problem Solving questions whilst OCR Critical Thinking Unit 2 is a very useful practice resource for Critical Thinking Questions.

    B) Recognise Pitfalls - In contrast to most A-Level examinations, BMAT Section 1 is full of tricks and trips, intended to misguide students. Fortunately, there are only so-many tricks that the BMAT are able to use. Hence, each time you come across one of these, add it to your 'personal list', to avoid making the same mistake in future practice.


    Section 2 (Scientific Knowledge and Applications) - 27 MCQ, 30 Minutes
    Question Types: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics

    A) Official Resource Guide - With this being the official resource guide, there really is no better resource for Section 2 preparation. Most students find it best to quickly review the whole guide and highlight any topics which they have not covered at GCSE level for further learning. Bear in mind that whilst Section 2 is supposed to be 'GCSE Level'; the examination can assess topics which you may not have covered until AS and sometimes even A2 due to variation in exam board specifications.

    B) Timing - Half the challenge of Section 2 is the limited time; hence, it essential to practice this section under strict timed conditions. Fast mental maths, confident use of fractions and a good background Biology knowledge, will ensure that you have additional time for those challenging Physics and Chemistry calculations.

    C) Resources - Once you have completed all official and BMAT specific resources, GCSE Bitesize is of some use, whilst you may wish to also consider practicing GCSE Maths Calculator papers, without a calculator in order to further improve your mental maths.


    Section 3 (Written Task) - 1 Essay (Choice of 4), 30 Minutes
    Question Types: Topical Medical Issues, Medical Ethics, Medical Philosophy, Veterinary Medicine

    A) Address all parts of the question - Each question normally has three or four parts. Regardless of how good your essay is, if you do not address all parts of the question, your essay will be capped at 3/3.5 as per the Section 3 Official Marking Criteria.

    B) Plan - With 30 minutes, and one A4 sheet provided, this section is the least time restricted. Essays which score highest are those which are well structured and address all parts of the question, bringing in additional topical examples and knowledge.


    Free BMAT Resources
    A) Official BMAT Past Papers (Style 1)
    B) Official BMAT Past Papers (Style 2)
    C) Past Paper Worked Solutions
    D) Section 1 Practice Questions
    E) Section 2 Practice Questions
    F) Practice Questions


    Books
    A) Preparing for the BMAT: The Official Guide to the Biomedical Admissions Test
    B) Get into Medical School. 400 BMAT Practice Questions
    THANKS. USEFUL information
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    Does anyone know how to get answer A for the third question in section 1 on the 2015 paper? TYIA
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    (Original post by michellem3)
    Does anyone know how to get answer A for the third question in section 1 on the 2015 paper? TYIA
    Are you talking about the one with the vans? The text says the reading is taken at the end of the month so if you want to see the distance from 1 September to 30 November, then you should do: November figure minus August figure and find which van has the largest difference. That is the red van ie Answer A.
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    Hi everyone

    I've started revising a little for the BMAT before things get heavy with university work - just wanted to ask how people are revising for section 1, other than with BMAT/TSA past papers?
    Is it worth buying a critical thinking textbook?
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    (Original post by immaa)
    Hi everyone

    I've started revising a little for the BMAT before things get heavy with university work - just wanted to ask how people are revising for section 1, other than with BMAT/TSA past papers?
    Is it worth buying a critical thinking textbook?
    Yes, but you need to make sure the texts aren't too long as if you buy books which are for things like City jobs the length of the texts can be enormous.

    Also the ISC book 700Q (which is the updated version of the 400Q book mentioned above) is pretty good for Section 1
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    (Original post by Ienjoylife)
    Yes, but you need to make sure the texts aren't too long as if you buy books which are for things like City jobs the length of the texts can be enormous.

    Also the ISC book 700Q (which is the updated version of the 400Q book mentioned above) is pretty good for Section 1
    Ooooh ISC 700Q sounds like a good shout - thanks for the heads up! Are you applying for 2017 entry too?
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    If anyone is looking for some Kaplan course materials that my daughter used and found helpful the link is here to my ebay posting which is a lot
    cheaper than attending the course from which the materials come -

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1420897907...84.m1554.l2649

    I will also be listing a book on personal statements for medicine shortly.
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    I'm thinking of starting a Whatsapp group for 2017 entry medics. Would anyone be interested?
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    Hi there,
    Just wondering how Oxford look at different sections of the BMAT, as I'm applying for Biomedical sciences this year.
    Thanks in advance
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    Specialist Advisor
    (Original post by HawaiiFive0)
    Hi there,
    Just wondering how Oxford look at different sections of the BMAT, as I'm applying for Biomedical sciences this year.
    Thanks in advance
    For Medicine they apply a 40-40-20 weighting to the score for section 1-2-3 (ie: sections 1 and 2 are worth twice as much as section3). I imagine the weighting would be similar for Biomedical Sciences.

    -Ali
    5th year medic, Cambridge
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    Bleh, don't want to start preparing for this yet :cry:
    So I wont!

    I'll probably start preparing mid September, once I've gotten back into the swing of school.

    The only BMAT university I'm going to apply to is BSMS
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    Is it too risky to apply to Cambridge, UCL, Bristol and Glasgow. I really like all of those uni's. I have AAAA at AS with high UMS average. Also I have a very unique application with a big tie in with UCL due to breakthrough treatment I underwent there which ended me up in some textbooks and medical write ups within urology, thus I want to be a Urologist. I have been volunteering at care homes since I was 14 and have excellent references from them all. Started volunteering in the hospital at 16 and still there now- also a good reference. Deputy head boy. Just giving an ish overview of my application. Help please?
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    (Original post by Elliottmanwaring)
    Is it too risky to apply to Cambridge, UCL, Bristol and Glasgow. I really like all of those uni's. I have AAAA at AS with high UMS average. Also I have a very unique application with a big tie in with UCL due to breakthrough treatment I underwent there which ended me up in some textbooks and medical write ups within urology, thus I want to be a Urologist. I have been volunteering at care homes since I was 14 and have excellent references from them all. Started volunteering in the hospital at 16 and still there now- also a good reference. Deputy head boy. Just giving an ish overview of my application. Help please?
    Personally, I wouldn't say that's too risky as long as you are confident you will do well on the BMAT, which I'm sure you can do with hard work
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    Which book should I get out of the two, I heard the official is short and Amazon reviews say the 400 questions have questions taken from past papers
 
 
 
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