Nat 5 English: Reading books.....

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A+Hunter
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#1
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#1
Hello,

According to my English teacher the easiest way to pass English is by "Reading Books."

I'm stumped for ideas :/ I don't really read books. I do read, But not books.

Has anyone got any good books for someone who's just starting to read?
Bear in mind I'm doing nat 5 english, and I'm only just starting to read "Books".

Thanks.
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username1283138
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#2
Report 6 years ago
#2
I would advise you to read quality news articles(The Times, The Herald, Scotland on Sunday etc.)
I didn't read that much, but I still got an A in nat 5 English by reading newspaper everyday. I mean, you don't have to read newspaper EVERYDAY! But every week would be good.
If you really want to read books, I would advise you to read whatever genre you like. I personally love mystery. Yeah, don't force yourself to read the classics like the Bronte sisters books or Shakespeare if you don't like them.. they are really boring imo...
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jenoverboard
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#3
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#3
Read anything! I read so many books during Nat 5 (I love to read anyway) and I didn't think it made much of a difference, but now I'm at higher I don't have any time to read and I'm definitely noticing that my analysis skills on RUAE etc are slipping - I don't think you necessarily need to read books, you could read newspapers, online articles, anything! Good luck with N5
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ElasticJane
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#4
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#4
Not sure if 'reading books' is the best advice. Reading, analysing and practicing techniques in opinion articles from papers like the Guardian will be very helpful, because they form the source material for paper 1 of your nat5 (30%), and the techniques can also be applied to paper 2 of your nat5 (40%).
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A+Hunter
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#5
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#5
(Original post by Junioh)
I would advise you to read quality news articles(The Times, The Herald, Scotland on Sunday etc.)
I didn't read that much, but I still got an A in nat 5 English by reading newspaper everyday. I mean, you don't have to read newspaper EVERYDAY! But every week would be good.
If you really want to read books, I would advise you to read whatever genre you like. I personally love mystery. Yeah, don't force yourself to read the classics like the Bronte sisters books or Shakespeare if you don't like them.. they are really boring imo...
(Original post by jenoverboard)
Read anything! I read so many books during Nat 5 (I love to read anyway) and I didn't think it made much of a difference, but now I'm at higher I don't have any time to read and I'm definitely noticing that my analysis skills on RUAE etc are slipping - I don't think you necessarily need to read books, you could read newspapers, online articles, anything! Good luck with N5
(Original post by ElasticJane)
Not sure if 'reading books' is the best advice. Reading, analysing and practicing techniques in opinion articles from papers like the Guardian will be very helpful, because they form the source material for paper 1 of your nat5 (30%), and the techniques can also be applied to paper 2 of your nat5 (40%).
So I should read newspapers and analyse them? Lol
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JM_1998
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#6
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#6
I didn't read at all at Nat 5 (still got an A)
However, during Higher I read Jane Eyre, out of my own volition, and absolutely adored it!
This then set me on to reading voraciously, everything from Tolstoy, to Austen, and even contemporary literary fiction as well
I'm now in 6th year doing a dissertation for AH English on Virginia Woolf's use of Time, with a handful of unconditional uni offers to study English as well 😂
So yeah "proper" reading can be a slippery slope, but an enjoyable one nonetheless 😊
I'd say find a theme that appeals to you first, so like what kind of topics recur in other media you enjoy ( movies/ tv shows etc) - and then after picking an area you are interested in, find "proper" books that cover these
For instance, if you like the Hunger Games movies ( I know they're also YA books, but eh) then read George Orwell's 1984, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World etc
Or if you like horror movies: Edgar Allan Poe, Shirley Jackson, MR James etc
So yeah, find a theme you're interested in and then do some research (or post the theme here and we'll help! 😁)
My personal reccomendations for someone starting out are:
Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar ( if you are feeling done with the world and anghsty then this is perfect, it's a gloriously depressing novel)
Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre (a dense Victorian door stopper may not be everyone's idea of an easy start, but I found the main character so easy to identify with; and if you can get past some of the language and its length it's truly worth it. It's one of the best books ever written in my opinion.)
Anything by Margaret Atwood (she may be a bit difficult, as she's postmodernist, but The Handmaid's Tale is regularly assigned to American HS students so I don't think it should be too challenging for someone just starting out, almost all of her novels deal with women/feminism and identity and they are bloody brilliant)
Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber (gothic fairy tale retellings with a feminist slant and imagery everywhere )
Anything by John Steinbeck (his prose is fairly clean and easy to read, and his novels are wonderful)
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A+Hunter
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#7
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#7
(Original post by JM_1998)
I didn't read at all at Nat 5 (still got an A)
However, during Higher I read Jane Eyre, out of my own volition, and absolutely adored it!
This then set me on to reading voraciously, everything from Tolstoy, to Austen, and even contemporary literary fiction as well
I'm now in 6th year doing a dissertation for AH English on Virginia Woolf's use of Time, with a handful of unconditional uni offers to study English as well 😂
So yeah "proper" reading can be a slippery slope, but an enjoyable one nonetheless 😊
I'd say find a theme that appeals to you first, so like what kind of topics recur in other media you enjoy ( movies/ tv shows etc) - and then after picking an area you are interested in, find "proper" books that cover these
For instance, if you like the Hunger Games movies ( I know they're also YA books, but eh) then read George Orwell's 1984, Aldous Huxley's Brave New World etc
Or if you like horror movies: Edgar Allan Poe, Shirley Jackson, MR James etc
So yeah, find a theme you're interested in and then do some research (or post the theme here and we'll help! 😁)
My personal reccomendations for someone starting out are:
Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar ( if you are feeling done with the world and anghsty then this is perfect, it's a gloriously depressing novel)
Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre (a dense Victorian door stopper may not be everyone's idea of an easy start, but I found the main character so easy to identify with; and if you can get past some of the language and its length it's truly worth it. It's one of the best books ever written in my opinion.)
Anything by Margaret Atwood (she may be a bit difficult, as she's postmodernist, but The Handmaid's Tale is regularly assigned to American HS students so I don't think it should be too challenging for someone just starting out, almost all of her novels deal with women/feminism and identity and they are bloody brilliant)
Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber (gothic fairy tale retellings with a feminist slant and imagery everywhere )
Anything by John Steinbeck (his prose is fairly clean and easy to read, and his novels are wonderful)
Yes thank you!

This is what I was looking for!

Cheers.
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alana_p
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#8
Report 6 years ago
#8
(Original post by A+Hunter)
Hello,

According to my English teacher the easiest way to pass English is by "Reading Books."

I'm stumped for ideas :/ I don't really read books. I do read, But not books.

Has anyone got any good books for someone who's just starting to read?
Bear in mind I'm doing nat 5 english, and I'm only just starting to read "Books".

Thanks.
you may want to maybe print off articles from the gaurdian, herald, times etc and highlight imagery, word choice, sentence structure and look up word you don't understand. "reading books" isn't the best advice, i mean it may help you but it isn't particularly essential and it shouldn't be forced. People learn in different ways, but what i do know is when i read, i pick up on how to write well (in terms of sentence structure, word choice and grammar etc) so maybe they mean that?
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A+Hunter
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#9
Report Thread starter 6 years ago
#9
(Original post by alana_p)
you may want to maybe print off articles from the gaurdian, herald, times etc and highlight imagery, word choice, sentence structure and look up word you don't understand. "reading books" isn't the best advice, i mean it may help you but it isn't particularly essential and it shouldn't be forced. People learn in different ways, but what i do know is when i read, i pick up on how to write well (in terms of sentence structure, word choice and grammar etc) so maybe they mean that?
I'm gonna start reading books, But more importantly reading some newspapers lol.

Thanks anyway ;D
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