Bubblybabybling
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I have a few reasons:
In my CGP book it says it causes the capillaries of the glomerulas to become damaged causing big molecules like proteins to come through- but how does this cause kidney failure?
Also the arteries which supply the kidneys with blood become narrow so the kdineys receive less blood, so less blood is filtered

Are there any more reasons or could you elaborate on this reasons?

Tanx
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Democracy
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(Original post by Bubblybabybling)
I have a few reasons:
In my CGP book it says it causes the capillaries of the glomerulas to become damaged causing big molecules like proteins to come through- but how does this cause kidney failure?
Also the arteries which supply the kidneys with blood become narrow so the kdineys receive less blood, so less blood is filtered

Are there any more reasons or could you elaborate on this reasons?

Tanx
The proteins coming through aren't the cause of failure, they're a sign of it. When an organ is said to be failing, that means its unable to do its job in a way that meets the body's demands. Ordinarily, the kidneys should not be letting protein through, so the fact that they are in the case you've mention indicates that some sort of malfunction is occuring.

The actual changes which cause the failure are what you've already described: the capillaries i.e. the small vessels of the kidneys become damaged due to high pressure which reduces their ability to filter as efficiently as possible. Clinically this manifests as a reduction in the glomerular filtration rate, which is how chronic kidney disease is staged:

http://www.renal.org/information-res....PkcKFC8e.dpbs

The bit where you talk about the arteries - you're referring to renal artery stenosis I'm assuming? So the arteries become clogged up and hardened over time which reduces the flow of blood through the vessels (ischaemia) and increases the pressure within the artery (due to the vessel becoming narrower). Reduced renal blood flow activates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway which in turn raises the body's blood pressure leading to a viscous circle of hypertension, ischaemia, further renovascular damage, and eventual kidney failure. Incidentally, when this same process of sclerosis and hypertension occurs in the smaller vessels, it's known as nephrosclerosis.
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