BZila
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Hello everyone,

I need a suggestion. I got accepted by UCL and Sciences Po for the MA in Human Rights and I am currently waiting for a reply from LSE.
I have a huge problem choosing one of these universities since they are all amazing, the courses all offer good insights, I am fluent in both english and french and love Paris and London (plus the fees and expenses would approximately be the same since Paris is 2 years).
Hence, I need an advice in terms of future job prospects. Which university do you think would be more appealing for a future career (considering the subject as well).. or does anyone go to one of these unis??

Thank you
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Tcannon
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I am familiar with LSE and Sciences Po MA HRHA, albeit not with UCL.

It depends on your areas of interests and professional goals. The syllabi btw LSE and PSIA are different. At LSE you choose your concentrations, essays and dissertation. 1 yr format. Have you made effort to look at individual modules: reading list, teaching methods, learning outcome and exam? i thought it was clear from correspondence with people with admissions at both unis.

PSIA: Broader, more modules but not as in depth. thematic and regional concentrations, electives in language and professional development. Exams in Dec, May and mid term assignments. The workload is formidable. note: 2 yr format with 3rd semester either dissertation, exchange abroad or most popular internship at gov or NGOs. Though tougher for international students to find jobs. Some adjuncts come from the field and bring in practical perspective (ie CEO of doctors without borders teaches a popular module). PSIA may offer in some aspects a better regional concentration in Middle East or Africa than LSE. Overall review varies from average teaching to excellent, depends on prof. PSIA has an odd registration for modules, first come basis. Some students can't get into popular modules. Some complaints about cramped library. If you are fluent in French, you can participate in more activities.
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BZila
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(Original post by Tcannon)
I am familiar with LSE and Sciences Po MA HRHA, albeit not with UCL.

It depends on your areas of interests and professional goals. The syllabi btw LSE and PSIA are different. At LSE you choose your concentrations, essays and dissertation. 1 yr format. Have you made effort to look at individual modules: reading list, teaching methods, learning outcome and exam? i thought it was clear from correspondence with people with admissions at both unis.

PSIA: Broader, more modules but not as in depth. thematic and regional concentrations, electives in language and professional development. Exams in Dec, May and mid term assignments. The workload is formidable. note: 2 yr format with 3rd semester either dissertation, exchange abroad or most popular internship at gov or NGOs. Though tougher for international students to find jobs. Some adjuncts come from the field and bring in practical perspective (ie CEO of doctors without borders teaches a popular module). PSIA may offer in some aspects a better regional concentration in Middle East or Africa than LSE. Overall review varies from average teaching to excellent, depends on prof. PSIA has an odd registration for modules, first come basis. Some students can't get into popular modules. Some complaints about cramped library. If you are fluent in French, you can participate in more activities.
Thank you for your reply. I understand that LSE's courses are more in depth but at the same time, the course is not broad enough as 80% of modules are focus on the same themes and it doesn't have modules focused on "research skills", which I believe would be quite important.
However, to be honest, as my MA is not properly useful in terms of finding a job.. I have to be more practical and realistic choosing the university that would most likely help me career wise. In fact.. what do you mean "Though tougher for international students to find jobs"? Don't they help you?
And.. on a final note, do LSE and Sciences Po offer the same career opportunities(in europe and internationally)?
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miiru
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So glad to have found this thread! I'm also applying to Sciences Po (got an offer already), LSE and probably UCL as well. And I just can't really decide which one would be a better choice for me!

I agree with @BZila that LSE's courses seem more in depth but narrower in terms of choices, and that parts of Sciences Po's programmes are more career-oriented.

@Tcannon, would you say that LSE is more academic oriented, and perhaps a better choice for those who'd like to pursue a PhD afterwards? I am very interested in the career prospect for both schools.
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BZila
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(Original post by miiru)
So glad to have found this thread! I'm also applying to Sciences Po (got an offer already), LSE and probably UCL as well. And I just can't really decide which one would be a better choice for me!

I agree with @BZila that LSE's courses seem more in depth but narrower in terms of choices, and that parts of Sciences Po's programmes are more career-oriented.

@Tcannon, would you say that LSE is more academic oriented, and perhaps a better choice for those who'd like to pursue a PhD afterwards? I am very interested in the career prospect for both schools.
Glad to know others are struggling as well. What courses did you choose?
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Tcannon
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@miiru: Generally speaking LSE has a more traditional, class room based course structure of taught master's. The narrow indepth focus is more conducive to PhD, but not as perfect as a research master's. Like most UK unis, LSE has specialised master's. Apart from MSc IR, there are master's for MPP, Development, IPE, Conflict and Governance. LSE has also a larger PhD programme.

PSIA offers the third semester option. If your goal is PhD programme, you take certain courses (It recommends Research design with Prof Vanessa Scherrer and Advanced Methodology). For career minded students, they take 6 month professional internship during 3rd semester and receive 30 credit points. I know 5 people at PSIA and they prefer internships for professional purpose over dissertation and PhD. I would say that apart from academic modules, PSIA has modules with a professional focus and some assignments are practical. Students are asked to do group project and write a real life grant proposal for a non profit or policy memo instead of essays. PSIA as a PhD programme and it is smaller, but I am sure that strong PSIA grads end up in other ranked PhD programmes. A dual master's student told me that he experiences a practical education at PSIA whereas his other uni relies on theoretical training. In short PSIA is more flexible and offers sth for both academic PhD hopefuls and professionals.
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