HollyCreed
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Hi,

I'm doing a level psychology at home through national extension college. The course is really good and they give lots of great material and a tutor for assignments. But i'm freaking out a bit because i just did a practice test and got 17/72, i didn't really do it like too the best i could just very roughly but going through i realised i didn't know a lot of answers. Like at the time i seem to remember the material then a month or so later i forget it all an now i'm a little worried that I know nothing. Like I have a hard time remembering all the different studies and who did them etc? Does anyone have any advice to help me out please? Thanks any help will be much appreciated. I'm doing the AQA A exams (the 4 so two AS, two A2) in may/june.
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Mateah
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Hey,given your situation I would suggest you revise 1 hour hardcore minimum a day without a break or 3 hours in a row with a 15 minute break in the middle somewhere.With the studies I use a whiteboard and keep rewriting and make sure to use different colours.Also, you can try flashcards which are great apparently though I haven't found this to be the best technique for myself.
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98curry76
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Don't worry too much. Lots of A level psych students find themselves in similiar situations to yours; they understand the content when initially learning it, but then it just fades out of memory. I would suggest ensuring that a good set of notes is made during initial learning, for this will provde the basis for future revision of that topic. Then, revise the topic until you are confident you could get 'good' marks on a practice question, then actually answer one of these practice questions. You can find such questions in most A level psychology textbooks, but if these aren't available to you, then maybe have a go at creating your own questions. It is imperative to ensure that your attemps at answering practice questions are representative of the real exam, i.e. they are conducted under timed conditions and you don't use your revision notes. After answering the question(s), have a go at self-marking them using your own notes. Don't be too generous or too harsh - just give the mark that you genuinely feel would be awarded to you in the real exam. This technique will help you build exam skills, revise certain topics and identify strengths and weaknesses.

Another important thing is to ensure that ALL aspects of EVERY topic have been revised before starting a mock exam. To get a good grade, you have to know all studies, theories, criticisms and possibly applications, depending on that particular topic. Build revision checklists that detail the components of each and every topic. You could colour code code thse revision checklists; I do green for fully confident, amber for slightly confident and red for not very confident. Anyone reading this - please drop me a message if you would like me to send you my revision checklists. Then, I prioirtise the revision of the latter two categories. This is a really good technique for familiarising yourself with everything that you need to know for the exam.

Furthermore, planning of revision is also important for A level psychology, just as it is for practically every academic qualification. Make timetables, planning to revise each topic a certain day, and (most importantly) stick to these timetables. My timetables for revision are pretty basic, featuring only two tables; 'DATE' and 'TASKS'. Once again, if you (or anyone else reading this) would like, I could send you a template through personal message.

Most importantly of all, I think, is to understand the distinction between 'I understand this at this moment in time' and 'I'm confident that I could recall this and apply it in the exam'. It's inevitable that you'll understand the content when initially learning it; A level psychology isn't really too difficult in the initial understanding department - the bulk of the difficulty is in revising all the information before mock exams or before real exams and mastering exam technique. It's particularly difficult for students who started the A level this year, because they have to follow the new linear style where AS exams only contribute to the whole A level when taken in the second year alongside A2 exams. If you didn't know about these changes, more information can be found here:
http://www.cife.org.uk/article/the-n...nd-gcse-exams/

If you - or anyone else reading this - would like more advice or information, then please do not hesitate to ask any oher questions here or drop me a message.

Hope I can help.
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rileystringer1
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I find it useful to summarise things onto cue cards
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