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    Yeah, sorry i meant 2 questions only!

    i should read what i write!:rolleyes:
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    do u reckon the unseen will be a poem?

    what sort of thing should i be writing as i don't know much about imperialism?

    please help
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    (Original post by Thom18)
    Definitely, but he only realises it from the elephant incident onwards. He mixes Orwell as a character (being naive) and Orwell the narrator (having hindsight), and shows that he looks back on his time with disdain, but when he was there he was pretty much oblivious to the oppression of imperialism.
    i'd like to remind people that Orwell wasn't his real name - it was Eric Arthur Blair. Orwell was brought up a middle class white man and born in India - in 1903 when it was still under the rule of the British Empire. This is an important fact to remember, as this meant that Orwell's view of the situation would have started out as a positive one as it was the only way he knew India and the Empire. Orwell joined the Imperial police as a way of avoiding University.

    Orwell's dislike of the English class system, and consequently the Empire was fostered when he attended Eton as a scholarship boy - this made him a prime target for the rich kids.

    Before he wrote the essay, Orwell travelled to Spain to report on the Civil War - here he grew to believe in socialism - this may have coloured his view of the incident in India.

    As it transpires the first question will be on AO 2+3:

    item one contains a lot of contextual references, and it can be seen that the elephant in the essay may be a metaphor - a grand one at that - for India itself. The hatred of the Burmese for Orwell in the story can be seen to represent the hatred of all colonial people for the British Empire. "The Burmese population had no weapons" may be seen to represent the lack of power of the Indian (and other colonies) people - "quite helpless" to defend themselves.

    "They did not like me, but with the magical rifle in my hands I was momentarily worth watching" shows how the British Empire tried to exercise power over the Indians, but how they fail - any real attention from the native peoples was temporary and distanced. Although the Empire believed themselves to have control over the Indians, the native princes in fact remained in power and controlled the provinces - the British consorts did nothing worthwhile.

    Back to the elephant. The shooting of the elephant can be seen to represent India brought to its knees "It was obvious that the elephant would never rise again" - just as India has struggled since to retain any form of power and money. The bullets being fired into the elephant "seemed to make no impression" could reflect on the lack of real power of the British over the Indians - despite appearances - also shown in the Burman's abuse of Orwell.

    i don't really think it'll matter hugely if you don't know tonnes about Imperialism, but it's a good idea to familiarise yourself with the basics. If nothing else, it'll give you a bit of knowledge on our background as Brits!

    that's all i'm going to write for now...
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    Thanks i found that really helpful and have given u rep for it.

    One thing - what did u mean by this -
    As it transpires the first question will be on AO 2+3:

    do u mean the first question will ask you to look at items 2 and 3?

    Ally
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    (Original post by boxersarecool)
    Thanks i found that really helpful and have given u rep for it.

    do u mean the first question will ask you to look at items 2 and 3?
    oh! thanks for that... if only i knew what the rep did :rolleyes:

    on the letter posted (somewhere) about the change in exam format, the letter states that question one will test Assessment Objectives (AO) 2 and 3 while question two will test AO 1, 4 and 5.
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    ok, cheers for that.

    Do u reckon the text that is positive about the empire is there to help us reasons why Orwell was in that position and why he shot the elephant.

    Or to contrast with the other text that is against idea of empire and explain why Orwell decided to become anti - empire.

    Any help is greatfully recieved
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    (Original post by boxersarecool)
    Do u reckon the text that is positive about the empire is there to help us reasons why Orwell was in that position and why he shot the elephant.

    Or to contrast with the other text that is against idea of empire and explain why Orwell decided to become anti - empire.
    I take it you mean Item 4?

    This text seems to offer a contrast to Orwell's essay - the Empire was in fact good in some ways; it gave countries the railways, christianty (although detracting from native customs and cultures, it was partly a good thing), and education (although to the very few - from 500 schools in India alone, only 30,000 Indians were educated in them - the rest were British Imperialists).

    However, the author seems a little naive in his beliefs that the Empire brings 'a means of giving to the congested masses at home open country instead of a blind alley' - this only this of the British and not the natives. Buchan's assumption that the Empire were "laying the basis of a federation of the world" and had "high conscientiousness" is quite blind - instead of bringing 'freedom' to the colonies, the British were enslaving them and altering their ways of life almost irreparably.

    Buchan's final declaration that he would like to be a British consul so that he could make "a corner of the desert bloosom and the solitary place glad" is quite remarkable - showing general British feeling that natives were savages who could not look after themselves or be truly happy without the British way of life being imposed upon them.

    Thoughts?
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    Is the fact that he doesn't want to shoot the elephant a sign that he is against imperialism/empire etc if the elephant is a metaphor for india.

    When he states - elephant - took not the slightest notice of the crowd's approach' - is that suggesting India ignored the British arriving? possibly not realising they were a threat?

    Sorry i have no idea if this is right as i don't do history so any help is great and will be reped!

    Are these similes -

    thick blood like red velvet

    and trunk reaching skywards like a tree

    Ally
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    (Original post by boxersarecool)
    Is the fact that he doesn't want to shoot the elephant a sign that he is against imperialism/empire etc if the elephant is a metaphor for india.

    When he states - elephant - took not the slightest notice of the crowd's approach' - is that suggesting India ignored the British arriving? possibly not realising they were a threat?

    Are these similes -
    thick blood like red velvet
    and trunk reaching skywards like a tree
    Orwell is reluctant to shoot the elephant - he doesn't want to shoot such a beautiful creature which doesn't appear to be doing any harm. However, he is forced into shooting it because of the pressure from the Indians. The elephant represents the British Empire - despite being against the idea of it, Orwell dislikes the idea of destroying it.

    The Indians ignoring the elephant can be said to show the colonial peoples view of the Imperial consorts etc - they dislike them, but disregard them as something which will do them no harm, and therefore is uninteresting. The interest rises when it appears the Empire (and the elephant) is weakening / being killed.

    Similes - look for 'like' - so yes
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    (Original post by Meghan)
    Orwell is reluctant to shoot the elephant - he doesn't want to shoot such a beautiful creature which doesn't appear to be doing any harm. However, he is forced into shooting it because of the pressure from the Indians. The elephant represents the British Empire - despite being against the idea of it, Orwell dislikes the idea of destroying it.

    The Indians ignoring the elephant can be said to show the colonial peoples view of the Imperial consorts etc - they dislike them, but disregard them as something which will do them no harm, and therefore is uninteresting. The interest rises when it appears the Empire (and the elephant) is weakening / being killed.

    Similes - look for 'like' - so yes

    Meghan, I totallly agree with you about the elephant - I also thought it represented the whole empire rather than just India (look at the description of it - "big", "huge" and "old"). The locals are described as "helpless" against it, just, as it seems, they are helpless against the Empire. Ironically Orwell says that as he was deciding whether to shoot the elephant or not, he felt like a "puppet" controlled by the wills of the "sea of yellow faces". The whole thing is described as a stage performance (you'll find the references if you read closely - I can't remember them right now). Although the narrator criticizes the treatment of the locals by the British, he feels that when he is forced to shoot the elephant, he is opressed by them and not the other way round.
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    (Original post by NIk)
    The whole thing is described as a stage performance (you'll find the references if you read closely - I can't remember them right now). Although the narrator criticizes the treatment of the locals by the British, he feels that when he is forced to shoot the elephant, he is opressed by them and not the other way round.
    Orwell is described as a conjuror i think (i can't be bothered to go and check) but that's certainly true.

    always remember the narrator is Orwell - this shows that the situation is highly biased and slanted.
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    Hope y'all find it useful:


    Britain conquered Burma over a period of 62 years (1824 - 1886), during which three Anglo-Burmese Wars took place, and incorporated it into its Indian Empire. Burma was administered as a province of India until 1937 when it became a separate, self-governing colony; independence was attained as a result of the Aung San–Attlee agreement which guaranteed Burmese independence. Aung San was assassinated before Burma attained its independence on January 4, 1948.
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    An anti-imperialist essay, Orwell frequently and clearly states his displeasure with colonial Britain, "I had already made up my mind that imperialism was an evil thing ... I was all for the Burmese and all against their oppressors, the British." Enslaved, Orwell adds, "all I knew was that I was stuck between my hatred of the empire I served ... I was only an absurd puppet pushed to and fro by the will of those yellow faces behind." Reflective, Orwell realizes being forced to impose strict laws and to shoot the elephant -- he states his feelings against the act, but submits after comprehending he "had got to shoot the elephant" -- illustrates an inherent problem of hegemony, "when the white man turns tyrant it is his own freedom that he destroys." By enforcing the strict British rule, he was forfeiting his freedom while concurrently oppressing the Burmans. A call to end imperialism, "Shooting an Elephant", ironically, appeals Britons to cease colonialism to maintain their freedom, a point buttressed by his "crucified" reference, hardly a motif in Buddhist Burma.
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    (Original post by Meghan)
    Orwell is described as a conjuror
    erm, Im not sure what you mean by that. The only description that we see of Orwell is that he gives himself. At the beginning he says about an event "making him a bit important" or sumn like that. Doesn't that suggest an inferiority complex? I got the impression that he was a very humble and submissive person.
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    does anyone have anything more to add on the other items?
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    so the elephant is definetly the fall of the british empire as opposed to the fall of india by british?

    Why would Orwell shoot his own empire, is that how we know he is against the empire?

    What is relevance that he may charge if you go near, but is fine if left alone.

    Thank u for all the help


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    (Original post by NIk)
    erm, Im not sure what you mean by that. The only description that we see of Orwell is that he gives himself. At the beginning he says about an event "making him a bit important" or sumn like that. Doesn't that suggest an inferiority complex? I got the impression that he was a very humble and submissive person.
    "they were watching me as they would a conjuror" - a kind of simile

    and the second part you mention is this: "I was hated by large numbers of people - the only time in my life that I was important enough for this to happen to me"

    Blair had been a middle class person all his life - but not as much so as the people he was surrounded by at Eton et al. Blair's scholarships made him insignificant and inadequate - unworthy of other people's attention.

    >>>so the elephant is definetly the fall of the british empire as opposed to the fall of india by british?

    yes it's quite widely acknowledged

    >>>Why would Orwell shoot his own empire, is that how we know he is against the empire?

    Orwell's shooting of the Empire is reflecting upon the dissent within the British Imperialists in the colonies who felt that what they were doing was wrong - a lot of them came to Orwell's way of thinking. Many of them resigned (as did Orwell) and returned home - there were thousands who did.

    >>>What is relevance that he may charge if you go near, but is fine if left alone.

    if the Empire was provoked, it would attack, but if left to get along with the business of ruling the colonies, it would be fine.
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    read my post on symbolism carefully: "By enforcing the strict British rule, he was forfeiting his freedom while concurrently oppressing the Burmans. A call to end imperialism, "Shooting an Elephant", ironically, appeals Britons to cease colonialism to maintain their freedom, a point buttressed by his "crucified" reference, hardly a motif in Buddhist Burma." - The existence of the empire was just as opressive for the British as it was for the Burmese - that's the great irony of it! Therefore he metaphorically destroys the empire by shooting the elephant 1) because he is under pressure from the locals, who hate the empire 2) because he also becomes free when the empire falls (and he also hates the empire).
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    (Original post by Meghan)
    "they were watching me as they would a conjuror" - a kind of simile

    and the second part you mention is this: "I was hated by large numbers of people - the only time in my life that I was important enough for this to happen to me"

    Blair had been a middle class person all his life - but not as much so as the people he was surrounded by at Eton et al. Blair's scholarships made him insignificant and inadequate - unworthy of other people's attention.

    Ok, thanks for clearing that up!
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    Ok, thanku i think i got it now!

    In the exam do we spend equal time on each question if only two?
    Sorry i don't know much have been ill so off college and teacher hasn't told me stuff

    This site is really helpful tho!
 
 
 

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