Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

english combined pre-release watch

Announcements
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    John Buchan wrote The Thirty-Nine Steps. There's a bit of last-minute (random) background knowledge.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NIk)
    I know I should only stick to item 2 for now, but I just cant help asking - does anyone get the feeling that the author of the item 3 is ironical when he talks about the "incisive overview" of the imperial history offered by BBC? Is he criticising the critics of the Empire? Does that make him a pro-imperialist? He also seems to criticise the claims made by the AWRRTC to make the europeans pay the reparations to the victims of the imperialists. Anyone?
    I thought that myself, apparently Niall Ferguson is a right wing historian. However when I got someone else to read it they felt he was just laying down the spectrum of opinions. Exam is 2 questions because I sat it in Jan (was a piss poor in exam material that day).
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    hey,

    (oops) how is everyone getting on?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mandy_spring)
    hey,

    (oops) how is everyone getting on?
    Alright, I suppose. I think now it's just a case of sitting the exam and hoping we get something manageable.
    Good luck, everyone! Just think, after this: No more English Literature!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mandy_spring)
    hey,

    (oops) how is everyone getting on?
    PANIC!

    Just got to the thread. Some nice comments, but my annotations are a bit on the heavy side.

    How should we write this? Should we have an opinion - like we're persuaded by one of the extracts, or take a cynical view of it all, or just write with no thought at all?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lemming)
    PANIC!

    Just got to the thread. Some nice comments, but my annotations are a bit on the heavy side.

    How should we write this? Should we have an opinion - like we're persuaded by one of the extracts, or take a cynical view of it all, or just write with no thought at all?
    OK, don't worry too much about it. I'm predicting that it'll say something like "how is your understanding of Item One affected by the other Items?", so just say how you responded to Item One, then go through Items 2, 3 and 4 in turn and say how they changed your opinion. Then conclude with overall how you feel about it. Then there'll be a question on comparing the pre-release with the new texts in the paper.
    All this is speculation. But if past papers are anything to go by, then maybe it'll be like this.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    This may be dredging up a dead thread, but...

    my teacher didn't receive any such correspondence from AQA referring to the format change to the paper, and told us it wasn't happening... it showed up!

    Did anyone else find it rather difficult to write answers to just 2 questions each for 1hr15? My hand was dead by the end of yesterday!

    Overall I thought the paper was brilliant, with the unseen material providing plenty of scope for analysis and easy to do AO2 on - thumbs up from me

    Fingers crossed all of my research paid off...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Meghan)
    This may be dredging up a dead thread, but...

    my teacher didn't receive any such correspondence from AQA referring to the format change to the paper, and told us it wasn't happening... it showed up!

    Did anyone else find it rather difficult to write answers to just 2 questions each for 1hr15? My hand was dead by the end of yesterday!

    Overall I thought the paper was brilliant, with the unseen material providing plenty of scope for analysis and easy to do AO2 on - thumbs up from me

    Fingers crossed all of my research paid off...


    That's true, the questions were quite good. I thought they'd ask somthing about the empire itself. Oh well.... I wrote 9 pages. Did anyone think that Kipling's poem sounded childish? What did u make of Confession?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NIk)
    That's true, the questions were quite good. I thought they'd ask somthing about the empire itself. Oh well.... I wrote 9 pages. Did anyone think that Kipling's poem sounded childish? What did u make of Confession?

    actually i thought question 2 was bad in the sense that it wasnt very 'literary' as in you couldnt really bring in a lot of extra background reading say, or theories.. i thought that question was badly worded.. but as i said before - question one was a beauty

    (to a previous post - your teacher should have told you..yes my hand was killing me, but i found it easier to focus on just 2 qeustions rather than 4 different ones.. you can see the letter from aqa posted on the first page by me!)

    confession - didnt really udnerstand the end of it.. didnt get who was who.. and i did think kiplings poem was chilcdish and over simplified which mirrored how there was an over generalized view of foreigners
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by NIk)
    That's true, the questions were quite good. I thought they'd ask somthing about the empire itself. Oh well.... I wrote 9 pages. Did anyone think that Kipling's poem sounded childish? What did u make of Confession?
    I thought the questions were fairly standard, really. No surprises. I think Confession was the harder of the two, as I didn't understand the ending very much. Nevertheless, it wasn't TOO bad. Just alright.
    p.s. had to ask for extra paper 4 times!! (but I have m-a-s-s-i-v-e handwriting)
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I didn't think We and They was childish I think it was intended humour on Kiplings behalf. The structure and therefore the tone of the poem made it not seem serious.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by presebjenada)
    (to a previous post - your teacher should have told you..yes my hand was killing me, but i found it easier to focus on just 2 qeustions rather than 4 different ones.. you can see the letter from aqa posted on the first page by me!)

    confession - didnt really udnerstand the end of it.. didnt get who was who.. and i did think kiplings poem was chilcdish and over simplified which mirrored how there was an over generalized view of foreigners
    my teacher didn't know! she hadn't received a letter :rolleyes:

    I thought We and They had a hint of satire in it, but I didn't write about it, because i was unsure, and thought it didn't really fit well with the time he was writing in. With hindsight, I should have just written about it
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I had read the day before that Kipling was a widely thought to be a facist and racist.

    Do i wrote the poems narrator could be seen to have racist views.

    I put he used negative vocab towards they.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by boxersarecool)
    I had read the day before that Kipling was a widely thought to be a facist and racist.

    Do i wrote the poems narrator could be seen to have racist views.

    I put he used negative vocab towards they.
    Hmm I actually thought Kipling was supposed to be quite open minded so based my answer on totally different viewpoint. Ah well thats my grade screwed...
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    'It reprises a favourite theme of Kipling’s, that the English should learn to respect other cultures.'

    'Judith van Heerswynghels, editor and translator of Debits and Credits in the Pléiade edition of Rudyard Kipling, Oeuvres, vol. IV [Gallimard: Liège, 2001]: suggested that this poem:
    evokes with humour the prejudices that become attached to foreigners whom respectable citizens despise and consider to be savages; an allusion can be seen here to the character, so odd and yet so deeply human, of Hickmot [p. 1247].'
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Dajoruna)
    'It reprises a favourite theme of Kipling’s, that the English should learn to respect other cultures.'

    'Judith van Heerswynghels, editor and translator of Debits and Credits in the Pléiade edition of Rudyard Kipling, Oeuvres, vol. IV [Gallimard: Liège, 2001]: suggested that this poem:
    evokes with humour the prejudices that become attached to foreigners whom respectable citizens despise and consider to be savages; an allusion can be seen here to the character, so odd and yet so deeply human, of Hickmot [p. 1247].'
    That's only one view. If a person has another and reasonably backs it up with his/her own views and quotes, then it's valid as anything else. Even if the poet had one idea about their own poem, a reader's different idea doesn't make it wrong. It's just another way of looking at it - hence why English Literature is so diverse and open-ended.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Ok, so as long as i backed it up with loads of quotes and reasons it should be ok?

    I hope so, i have two english teachers and they often have different takes on things so hopefully as things are so diverse as long as u state why u thought this and it is reasonable then it will be ok?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by boxersarecool)
    Ok, so as long as i backed it up with loads of quotes and reasons it should be ok?

    I hope so, i have two english teachers and they often have different takes on things so hopefully as things are so diverse as long as u state why u thought this and it is reasonable then it will be ok?
    Yep, that's why English and the arts are so different to the sciences. It's open to interpretation (eg. In the Canterbury Tales, the Knight can be seen as a perfect gentleman or a bloodthirsty mercenary), and every interpretation is valid. If you've backed it up with facts and quotes, then the examiner won't just chuck it out because it's something he/she doesn't agree with. That, forsooth, would be madness.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.