Need help in chemistry bonding theory Watch

Somadiner
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I am revising C2 AQA higher for my mocks in year 11 and I am a bit confused on this topic. On one page it said that when melting, the intermolecular forces break and not the covalent bonds but now on another page it says that giant covalent structures have high melting points because it takes a lot of energy to break the covalent bonds? So which bond actually breaks when melting???? Is there a different between simple molecular structure and giant covalent structure in terms of which bonds to break?

And plus do giant covalent structures have intermolecular forces, and if they do why don't they break whilst melting instead of the covalent bonds?
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rxns_00
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(Original post by Somadiner)
I am revising C2 AQA higher for my mocks in year 11 and I am a bit confused on this topic. On one page it said that when melting, the intermolecular forces break and not the covalent bonds but now on another page it says that giant covalent structures have high melting points because it takes a lot of energy to break the covalent bonds? So which bond actually breaks when melting???? Is there a different between simple molecular structure and giant covalent structure in terms of which bonds to break?

And plus do giant covalent structures have intermolecular forces, and if they do why don't they break whilst melting instead of the covalent bonds?
You're talking about two different types of compounds.

Simple molecular structures, like water molecules, melt when the intermolecular forces weaken, they then evaporate when the intermolecular forces are overcomed.

Giant covalent structures are held only by covalent bonds - eg diamond. To melt a diamond, you have to start breaking the covalent bonds. There are no intermolecular bonds here because there's no molecules, just one large structure.
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High Stakes
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Yeah bro. The only structures that have intermolecular bonds are simple molecular structures. Everything else, including ionic, metallic and giant covalent will depend on its intramolecular bonds. The only exception is graphite tho.

Imagine if when you boiled water, you broke the intramolecular bonds and started producing a lot of hydrogen gas. Wouldn't be very good!
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High Stakes
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(Original post by RonnieRJ)
You're talking about two different types of compounds.

Simple molecular structures, like water molecules, melt when the intermolecular forces weaken, they then evaporate when the intermolecular forces are overcomed.

Giant covalent structures are held only by covalent bonds - eg diamond. To melt a diamond, you have to start breaking the covalent bonds. There are no intermolecular bonds here because there's no molecules, just one large structure.
U BEAT ME TO IT sosdasdoasijdoasjdoiajDIASH :rofl:


:ashamed2:
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Somadiner
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Thanks a lot

(Original post by RonnieRJ)
You're talking about two different types of compounds.

Simple molecular structures, like water molecules, melt when the intermolecular forces weaken, they then evaporate when the intermolecular forces are overcomed.

Giant covalent structures are held only by covalent bonds - eg diamond. To melt a diamond, you have to start breaking the covalent bonds. There are no intermolecular bonds here because there's no molecules, just one large structure.
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Somadiner
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Is 'intramolecular forces" A-Level?
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rxns_00
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(Original post by High Stakes)
U BEAT ME TO IT sosdasdoasijdoasjdoiajDIASH :rofl:


:ashamed2:
Lmao sorry

(Original post by Somadiner)
Is 'intramolecular forces" A-Level?
Nope, just GCSE.
Intermolecular - between molecules
Intramolecular - within molecules
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