What is the Chemical Equation for the breakdown of Carbohydrates, Proteins & Lipids?

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squirrology
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#1
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#1
I need to know the CHEMICAL (Not WORD) equation for the breakdown of Carbohydrates, Proteins & Lipids by enzymes & the actual products of the nutrients digestion.
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mice8cheese
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#2
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It will depend on the specific carbohydrate, protein and lipid.
Glucose (a carbohydrate) will have a recognisable equation of:
C6H12O6 + 6O2 -> 6H20 + 6CO2.
Lipids are hydrolysed to fatty acids (depends on the lipid) and glycerol (C3H8O3), and can be further broken down in respiration.
Proteins are hydrolysed into amino acids. These are deaminated (removing ammonia, NH3, which is turned into urea, CO(NH2)2) and a carboxylic acid with some sort of side chain (depending on the amino acid). What happens to it next depends on the type, but it will also be broken down in respiration.
Thats the best I can do without specific examples (limited to just giving you A-Level information. I could go into a lot more detail, but I'm sure don't want that)
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squirrology
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#3
Report Thread starter 5 years ago
#3
(Original post by mice8cheese)
It will depend on the specific carbohydrate, protein and lipid.
Glucose (a carbohydrate) will have a recognisable equation of:
C6H12O6 + 6O2 -> 6H20 + 6CO2.
Lipids are hydrolysed to fatty acids (depends on the lipid) and glycerol (C3H8O3), and can be further broken down in respiration.
Proteins are hydrolysed into amino acids. These are deaminated (removing ammonia, NH3, which is turned into urea, CO(NH2)2) and a carboxylic acid with some sort of side chain (depending on the amino acid). What happens to it next depends on the type, but it will also be broken down in respiration.
Thats the best I can do without specific examples (limited to just giving you A-Level information. I could go into a lot more detail, but I'm sure don't want that)
Thanks so much for the reply! Is it possible if you could also give me specific chemical equation examples for Lipids and Proteins.
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