Any data correlating a-level to Degree clasfication against Uni ranking?

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skeptical_john
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Although (at a push) I could get into a RG uni I may end up due to need to stay at home end up going to a very low ranked uni (ie 60ish).

Personally I feel - with the exception of a few careers - employers don't care that much about the uni but I am concerned that a course with lower qualified candidates will go slower and result in a lower grade.

So, is there any data out there that shows who people performed at each uni vs their a-level results?
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Dusky Mauve
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If it makes you feel any better, my boyfriend got BBE at A-Level and then went on to be one of 5 people to get a first class on his degree.
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Smack
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(Original post by skeptical_john)
Although (at a push) I could get into a RG uni I may end up due to need to stay at home end up going to a very low ranked uni (ie 60ish).

Personally I feel - with the exception of a few careers - employers don't care that much about the uni but I am concerned that a course with lower qualified candidates will go slower and result in a lower grade.

So, is there any data out there that shows who people performed at each uni vs their a-level results?
One of the tables used to, and perhaps still does, provide both the average UCAS tariff points of students and the ratio of good honours, where good honours is defined as a 2:1 or above, awarded at that university. Not exactly what you're after, I'm afraid, but worth a look.
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skeptical_john
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(Original post by Smack)
One of the tables used to, and perhaps still does, provide both the average UCAS tariff points of students and the ratio of good honours, where good honours is defined as a 2:1 or above, awarded at that university. Not exactly what you're after, I'm afraid, but worth a look.
That would be interesting to see. I've not been able to turn up much info in my own searches. It's interesting that there are endless debates on this forum on uni x is better than y but there is very little data to back any of this up.
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beautifulbigmacs
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I don't see how the ranking of a university determines course difficulty and therefore potentially, the degree classification that someone may or may not get. Surely it's all going to be relative (all undergraduate degrees from UK universities are at level 6 on the QCF framework).
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by skeptical_john)
Although (at a push) I could get into a RG uni I may end up due to need to stay at home end up going to a very low ranked uni (ie 60ish).

Personally I feel - with the exception of a few careers - employers don't care that much about the uni but I am concerned that a course with lower qualified candidates will go slower and result in a lower grade.

So, is there any data out there that shows who people performed at each uni vs their a-level results?
I don't think such data would be easy to find.

This website ( https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/ ) tells you the proportions of classifications awarded for each course at each university though, which may be useful.

Tbh, I'd have thought a course with lower qualified candidates may well be easier for you to get a good classification on, since it'd be easier for you to stand out compared to your peers.
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skeptical_john
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(Original post by beautifulbigmacs)
I don't see how the ranking of a university determines course difficulty and therefore potentially, the degree classification that someone may or may not get. Surely it's all going to be relative (all undergraduate degrees from UK universities are at level 6 on the QCF framework).
You know how in secondary school you get split into sets higher / middle / lower (that's how mine was anyway) all the kids are learning GCSE maths yet the ones in the top will be learning at a very different rate than the lower class. Well, a uni class full of AAA students will be taught at much speedier rate than a CCC class.

There's also the benefit of being able to learn more of your peers if they are at the same or higher level than you vs being a big fish in a small pond etc....
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skeptical_john
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(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
I don't think such data would be easy to find.

This website ( https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/ ) tells you the proportions of classifications awarded for each course at each university though, which may be useful.

Tbh, I'd have thought a course with lower qualified candidates may well be easier for you to get a good classification on, since it'd be easier for you to stand out compared to your peers.
Ah yes, I was aware of that site but did not know about the ability to see the degree classifications. Thank you. Would love to have the whole data dump to play with.

As for your last point see my previous post.
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beautifulbigmacs
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That's exactly how I saw it when being determined to get into a Russel Group. In practice, once you're at uni it's not really like that. You're given the work and you complete the same number of credits each term and the content is delivered proportionately each week and everyone is just getting on with their own thing. Honestly, the lecturers just deliver everything at a similar pace and how well you do depends on what you do out of class. It's impossible for the pace and challenge to be slowed down or sped up by the ability of other people on the course because a lecture is a lecture at the end of the day and it won't be advanced or simplified depending on whether it is a Russell Group or not.

(Original post by skeptical_john)
You know how in secondary school you get split into sets higher / middle / lower (that's how mine was anyway) all the kids are learning GCSE maths yet the ones in the top will be learning at a very different rate than the lower class. Well, a uni class full of AAA students will be taught at much speedier rate than a CCC class.

There's also the benefit of being able to learn more of your peers if they are at the same or higher level than you vs being a big fish in a small pond etc....
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by skeptical_john)
Ah yes, I was aware of that site but did not know about the ability to see the degree classifications. Thank you. Would love to have the whole data dump to play with.

As for your last point see my previous post
.
You may be interested to read this research from the Sutton Trust, just to give you an alternative point of view:

"Students attending highly selective universities - those with a high percentage of students with A level grades ABB or AAC or above (a high UNIdiff value) - were less likely to achieve as high a class of degree as students from less selective universities with similar attainment."

Source: http://www.suttontrust.com/wp-conten...port-final.pdf

See page 31 of the PDF (page 31 of the computer document, it has page number 25 printed on it).

So basically what they are saying is, if you take a student with a certain set of A Level grades, that student is more likely to get a good classification if they study at a university where the average A Level grades of their peers is low.
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skeptical_john
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Blimey, checked a few courses and 60% plus seem to be getting 2:1 or better. Had no idea that pass rates wee so high.
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Origami Bullets
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I think the fundamental thing to realise here is that university degrees are not like A Levels. For A Levels and GCSEs, there are a few different exam boards, but students from different schools across the country will follow the same syllabus and it will be marked centrally to the same standard.

In contrast, universities design, teach, examine and mark all their own degrees, from beginning to end. Each individual module will tend to be based on that individual lecturer's research interests, and so there will be a great deal of variation in terms of topics taught.

There is also a great deal of variation in terms of the standards expected of students. Regardless of all degrees theoretically being equivalent qualifications, the fact is that different volumes and quality of work will be required from students at different universities, even when they are studying the same subject. If you don't believe me, have a look at this http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...54&postcount=3 (unfortunately the original link has now broken, but you can see the pertinent bit quoted there).
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skeptical_john
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(Original post by Origami Bullets)
I think the fundamental thing to realise here is that university degrees are not like A Levels. For A Levels and GCSEs, there are a few different exam boards, but students from different schools across the country will follow the same syllabus and it will be marked centrally to the same standard.

In contrast, universities design, teach, examine and mark all their own degrees, from beginning to end. Each individual module will tend to be based on that individual lecturer's research interests, and so there will be a great deal of variation in terms of topics taught.

There is also a great deal of variation in terms of the standards expected of students. Regardless of all degrees theoretically being equivalent qualifications, the fact is that different volumes and quality of work will be required from students at different universities, even when they are studying the same subject. If you don't believe me, have a look at this http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...54&postcount=3 (unfortunately the original link has now broken, but you can see the pertinent bit quoted there).
What about courses with accreditation? Would they not have some standards maintained across different unis? The course I'm interested in, for example, is accredited by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications.

Though there was some very interesting discussion on that thread.
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