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Is Environmental science a good degree?

I'm torn between choosing English or Environmental science as a degree for university. I'm not sure what type of careers and jobs I could do and if there were many options. If anyone's doing this degree, I would love to hear what you do and learn. Thanks!
Original post by Louanneee
I'm torn between choosing English or Environmental science as a degree for university. I'm not sure what type of careers and jobs I could do and if there were many options. If anyone's doing this degree, I would love to hear what you do and learn. Thanks!


Environmental science can be a great degree for job prospects if you tailor it wisely. If you're not looking to take it further to PhD level, look for programmes that offer modules focused on developing actual skills, rather than those that just teach you about geological history etc. GIS competence is widely sought after in environmental careers, as is an ability to analyse remote sensing images, so look out for courses that give you option to pick up these kinds of applicable skills. UCL's Environmental Geography degree is very good with the range of skills-based options available.

Source: I'm a molecular biology graduate but am in the process of transitioning from a lab-based genetics job to a career in environmental surveying. I've noticed that understandings of GIS and of land management/land use are pretty much universally desired in the field. The job descriptions suggest that they may have a slight preference for environmental science graduates over graduates from other areas of science, but it's the skills you've developed that are what they really care about. Also remember that, unlike most undergraduates in the UK, you will really want to be diligent in securing internships or other relevant work placements over the summer, as these will give you hands-on experience that will be invaluable when it comes to submitting your CVs in a few years.

Also bear in mind that many universities will offer environmental science degrees under other names, like geography or geology. These courses aren't always as narrow as their names might suggest.
(edited 8 years ago)
Original post by Louanneee
I'm torn between choosing English or Environmental science as a degree for university. I'm not sure what type of careers and jobs I could do and if there were many options. If anyone's doing this degree, I would love to hear what you do and learn. Thanks!


Environmental sciences can give good prospects especially in the way the world is heading now.
English, i heard is not the greatest for prospects as there is no job as an english researcher' if that makes sense the only jobs that most English graduates get are either teachers or jobs which have no direct relation towards the degree itself.

What do you currently enjoy more? and by how much?
Reply 3
Just about to study Environmental Science as a 41 years old and use my 25 years off working outside into the OU Degree. There alot of confusing research out there . I am not an Academic person but hopefully the knowledge will help me through.

What are you thoughts on this Please
Hi!

I'm a 3rd year BSc Earth and Environmental Sciences student here at Lancaster University and I absolutely love my degree. If you're coming from a humanities background, Lancaster offers an American-style minor system, so if you're torn between Environmental Science and English, then you have the opportunity to take the other as your minor, and there will be opportunities for you to change degree to your minor if you find that is what you enjoy most. Programmes in the Lancaster Environment Centre (LEC) are really flexible and you can tailor your degree to specific interests, as there are only a couple of core (compulsory) modules after first year with tons of different options to choose from. I'm particularly interested in hydrology, so this year I am taking Hydrogeology and Water Resources Management modules that complement my interests well, but there are also different pathways if you enjoy a different sub-discipline such as climate science - there are Atmospheric Chemistry, Earth System Science, and Climate & Society modules as well.

The job prospects are great too, like others have mentioned. Many skills like GIS, remote sensing, or more generally lab/field work will benefit you greatly in later life, study, and employment. LEC also gives you the option to undertake a work placement or year studying abroad on exchange, which open up so many doors to potential employment or further study in other countries (although I'm sure this will be available in other universities as well, but I would check their course pages first if this is something that interests you). I personally studied abroad at the University of Waterloo in Canada last year, and studying a course such as this has meant that I have travelled to, and carried out fieldwork in new places in a country I've never been to before.

If you have ant questions then just drop them before and I will be happy to answer!

^Harry (LEC Student Ambassador)
Reply 5
In my opinion I have red an article and it says:
"An environmental science degree needs you to study physics, chemistry, biology, geology, mathematics, atmospheric science, etc. Furthermore, studying all of these subjects at the same time can be a little intimidating and you will need quite a bit of determination and passion to complete it. So, let’s detangle some of the factors that add to the complexity of environmental science."
Source: https://educatoroid.com/is-environmental-science-hard/

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