should the minimum driving age be increased from 17? Watch

This discussion is closed.
TheMcSame
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#41
Report 3 years ago
#41
A lot of accidents with new drivers stems from bad teachings.
E.G.
- Sitting on the brake and the bite, eventually the pupil will get it wrong, release the brake and stall the car because the clutch pedal was too high, but not high enough to stall with the brake on, which will cause the car to lurch forward and likely result in the driver rear-ending someone.
- Pupils are almost always taught how to set off using just the clutch when being taught in a diesel which causes them to stall when they buy a small petrol and they go for a small gap, stall and get hit.

Don't punish the driver, regulate the ADI's better, make sure they're teaching everything as they should. Make sure they're teaching people how to drive for life, not just how to pass their test in the ADI's car...
1
Flame Alchemist
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#42
Report 3 years ago
#42
Coming from a private school acquianted with some people who sadly fulfil every stereotype you could throw at them, the most abhorrent problem that I've seen are the overpriveliged middle-class girls with absolutely no respect for the road or their car and with parents rich enough to buy them a new car for every day of the year (and the willingness to, also).

The sheer amount of crashed cars and laughing emoticons I see on Instagram from girls in my year (often followed shortly by new gifted cars) is astounding.

In comparison, interestingly enough, the guys in my year who have bothered driving generally actually care about driving and cars and have yet to be involved in any sort of accident, as far as I can remember :rolleyes:
0
Katty3
Badges: 15
Rep:
?
#43
Report 3 years ago
#43
The test should be made much harder. There should be a minimum amount of time that a person has to spend as a learner having lessons before they can take the test.

That would mean that people should not be let loose on the roads without knowing what they're doing. It's not the age, it's the experience.
1
tobie123
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#44
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#44
(Original post by TheMcSame)
A lot of accidents with new drivers stems from bad teachings.
E.G.
- Sitting on the brake and the bite, eventually the pupil will get it wrong, release the brake and stall the car because the clutch pedal was too high, but not high enough to stall with the brake on, which will lurch forward and likely result in the driver rear-ending someone.
- Pupils are almost always taught how to set off using just the clutch when being taught in a diesel which causes them to stall when they buy a small petrol and they go for a small gap, stall and get hit.

Don't punish the driver, regulate the ADI's better, make sure they're teaching everything as they should. Make sure they're teaching people how to drive for life, not just how to pass their test in the ADI's car...
I think that is a good point. I got a lift with a 17 year old who had passes that afternoon then borrowed his mum's car for the first time to drive to football training and he must have stalled about 10 times. his instructor should never have put him in for his test!
0
tobie123
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#45
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#45
(Original post by sjgriffiths)
Coming from a private school acquianted with some people who sadly fulfil every stereotype you could throw at them, the most abhorrent problem that I've seen are the overpriveliged middle-class girls with absolutely no respect for the road or their car and with parents rich enough to buy them a new car for every day of the year (and the willingness to, also).

The sheer amount of crashed cars and laughing emoticons I see on Instagram from girls in my year (often followed shortly by new gifted cars) is astounding.

In comparison, interestingly enough, the guys in my year who have bothered driving generally actually care about driving and cars and have yet to be involved in any sort of accident, as far as I can remember :rolleyes:
So are less guys bothering to learn to drive at 17? When I was at school almost all the lads learnt as soon as we were 17 and there were loads of accidents driving to and from school and during free periods
0
fr0sr_
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#46
Report 3 years ago
#46
(Original post by domonict)
The U.K. Age for driving has been 17 since 1930

Arguably, given the amount of traffic and complexity of the roads/cars now 18 could be better.
Personally, I think all drivers should have to learn road sense on mopeds or small motorcycles.
Make a mistake and it hurts. Most bikers make good drivers
I second that.
As a Scooter rider (of about 8 months) I've only required about 10 driving lessons, and I have the ability to drive as well if not marginally better than people I know that actually have licences.
0
SmellyProtein
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#47
Report 3 years ago
#47
(Original post by tobie123)
people who pass 1st time are statistically most dangerous. They have the least time learning before they can go out on their own
Yeahh there are lots of stupid statistics like right handed people live longer than left handed people....It would make people practice more before taking their test as they won't want to wait another 6 months when an extra month or 2 of lessons would help them pass first time.
1
Mayhem™
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#48
Report 3 years ago
#48
(Original post by RF_PineMarten)
anyone with an IQ above room temperature can see is simply not practical.
this line deserves an infinite amount of rep
1
sb_theone
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#49
Report 3 years ago
#49
I think the boys should begin learning from 16 so that by the time they reach 17 they will have already had a years experience and therefore be safer.
0
tobie123
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#50
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#50
(Original post by SmellyProtein)
Yeahh there are lots of stupid statistics like right handed people live longer than left handed people....It would make people practice more before taking their test as they won't want to wait another 6 months when an extra month or 2 of lessons would help them pass first time.
but at the moment you get kids doing intensive courses and being out on their own within a few weeks of turning 17 with hardly any driving experience
0
TeeEm
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#51
Report 3 years ago
#51
definitely and it will happen (on its way)
21 is more appropriate these days.
Driving is a privilege and not a right
0
سِيسِي
Badges: 2
Rep:
?
#52
Report 3 years ago
#52
There shouldn't be a minimum age for driving, that's completely unnecessary and it's just an unnecessary restriction on people's lives. It's very silly. There shouldn't be a minimum age for anything. If you can drive then you can drive, it makes no difference if you're 7 or 20. Age requirement makes no sense. The people who make the law are very silly.
0
tobie123
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#53
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#53
(Original post by سِيسِي)
There shouldn't be a minimum age for driving, that's completely unnecessary and it's just an unnecessary restriction on people's lives. It's very silly. There shouldn't be a minimum age for anything. If you can drive then you can drive, it makes no difference if you're 7 or 20. Age requirement makes no sense. The people who make the law are very silly.
it's about the maturity to use a car properly and make the right decisions / observation skills. You can't let kids behind the wheel!
0
RF_PineMarten
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#54
Report 3 years ago
#54
(Original post by TeeEm)
definitely and it will happen (on its way)
21 is more appropriate these days.
Driving is a privilege and not a right
"Driving is a privilege" is not an argument for raising the minimum age, and there is no sign that it will happen.

With the driving age at 17, that gives plenty of time for people to learn to drive, and many pass at around age 18. Age 18 is important because they're legal adults and will likely need greater independence, whether they want to go to university or go straight into work after finishing school. Many of them need a car to be able to function as an adult, especially in rural areas where public transport is poor.
0
tobie123
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#55
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#55
(Original post by RF_PineMarten)
"Driving is a privilege" is not an argument for raising the minimum age, and there is no sign that it will happen.

With the driving age at 17, that gives plenty of time for people to learn to drive, and many pass at around age 18. Age 18 is important because they're legal adults and will likely need greater independence, whether they want to go to university or go straight into work after finishing school. Many of them need a car to be able to function as an adult, especially in rural areas where public transport is poor.
the trouble is lots of 17 year olds take quick courses and are on the road after 20 hours of lessons, barely 17 and driving to school with a car full of mates
0
TeeEm
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#56
Report 3 years ago
#56
(Original post by RF_PineMarten)
"Driving is a privilege" is not an argument for raising the minimum age, and there is no sign that it will happen.

With the driving age at 17, that gives plenty of time for people to learn to drive, and many pass at around age 18. Age 18 is important because they're legal adults and will likely need greater independence, whether they want to go to university or go straight into work after finishing school. Many of them need a car to be able to function as an adult, especially in rural areas where public transport is poor.
you are entitled to your opinion to which I do not subscribe.

All the best
0
earthworm
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#57
Report 3 years ago
#57
Would **** over those in rural areas.
1
evalilyXOX
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#58
Report 3 years ago
#58
i would disagree. I think that 17 is old enough to start learning how to drive. You will only be able to pass the exam if you show that you are a capable driver so it is not as if clueless 17 year olds are getting behind the wheel without any experience.

the drinking thing is completely different as it has more the do with the negative affects on an adolescent body that alcohol has.
0
tobie123
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#59
Report Thread starter 3 years ago
#59
(Original post by evalilyXOX)
i would disagree. I think that 17 is old enough to start learning how to drive. You will only be able to pass the exam if you show that you are a capable driver so it is not as if clueless 17 year olds are getting behind the wheel without any experience.

the drinking thing is completely different as it has more the do with the negative affects on an adolescent body that alcohol has.
have you ever been in a car driven by a 17 year old boy?!
0
evalilyXOX
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#60
Report 3 years ago
#60
(Original post by tobie123)
have you ever been in a car driven by a 17 year old boy?!
Yes I have. But then if you learn at any age whether it is 17 or 27, you are never going to be perfect in the beginning.

I learnt to drive aged 17, and I was nowhere near a perfect driver at the beginning. however after many lessons and lots of hours practising, I became more and more confident.

I have been driving for 2 years now and I am very thankful that I learnt to drive at the age I did.

I have watched others, both friends and family, who have postponed learning to drive out of fear that they were too young and left it until years and years after. They actually struggle more now as a mature learner as they say that it is better to learn young as you have more confidence as age can knock your confidence.

My aunt left learning to drive until she was in her 30s, and she still hasn't passed after sitting the practical test 7 times ! I mean not every older driver is like her, but certainly from the people i know, the ones who learnt younger are the better drivers.
0
X
new posts

All the exam results help you need

2,830

people online now

225,530

students helped last year

Do you have grade requirements for your sixth form/college?

At least 5 GCSEs at grade 4 (34)
15.6%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 5 (32)
14.68%
At least 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (45)
20.64%
Higher than 5 GCSEs at grade 6 (83)
38.07%
Pass in English and Maths GCSE (12)
5.5%
No particular grades needed (12)
5.5%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise