should the minimum driving age be increased from 17? Watch

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tobie123
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#61
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(Original post by evalilyXOX)
Yes I have. But then if you learn at any age whether it is 17 or 27, you are never going to be perfect in the beginning.

I learnt to drive aged 17, and I was nowhere near a perfect driver at the beginning. however after many lessons and lots of hours practising, I became more and more confident.

I have been driving for 2 years now and I am very thankful that I learnt to drive at the age I did.

I have watched others, both friends and family, who have postponed learning to drive out of fear that they were too young and left it until years and years after. They actually struggle more now as a mature learner as they say that it is better to learn young as you have more confidence as age can knock your confidence.

My aunt left learning to drive until she was in her 30s, and she still hasn't passed after sitting the practical test 7 times ! I mean not every older driver is like her, but certainly from the people i know, the ones who learnt younger are the better drivers.
there's a fine balance between too young and too old. From experience I just don't think 17 year old school kids should be let loose in a car on their own.
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evalilyXOX
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(Original post by tobie123)
there's a fine balance between too young and too old. From experience I just don't think 17 year old school kids should be let loose in a car on their own.
That is true but i still feel that no matter what age you learn to drive at, there are still the same risks involved.

My mum is a senior nurse in an intensive care unit specialising in head injuries. She has said herself that the largest number of cases she sees has to do with elderly drivers and middle aged drivers who fall asleep at the wheel.

She has said that the number of young driver cases has decreased a lot over the years and it is now the oldest generation who carry the most risks.

I completely respect your opinion though and i understand where you are coming from. As a driver who past at 17, so long as they are taught properly I see no harm.
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tobie123
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(Original post by evalilyXOX)
That is true but i still feel that no matter what age you learn to drive at, there are still the same risks involved.

My mum is a senior nurse in an intensive care unit specialising in head injuries. She has said herself that the largest number of cases she sees has to do with elderly drivers and middle aged drivers who fall asleep at the wheel.

She has said that the number of young driver cases has decreased a lot over the years and it is now the oldest generation who carry the most risks.

I completely respect your opinion though and i understand where you are coming from. As a driver who past at 17, so long as they are taught properly I see no harm.
agree old people are the worst! I think it depends on the person whether they are ready at 17, generally girls seen to mature a bit earlier. Did you notice a difference in driving or bumps between your male and female friends?
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evalilyXOX
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(Original post by tobie123)
agree old people are the worst! I think it depends on the person whether they are ready at 17, generally girls seen to mature a bit earlier. Did you notice a difference in driving or bumps between your male and female friends?
I know right !!

Yeah I think some people feel ready to drive at a younger age so it just depends how you feel.

I actually found that my male friends passed quicker and younger than my female friends. however my female friends tended to pass first time round whereas the guys passed on their second sitting
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AmateurRocketman
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I think the age to start lessons should be lowered to 16, but tests still at 17+, so the keenies who might rush through an intensive course will instead have the best part of a year's experience, in a variety of conditions so they don't get scared the first time a drive is rainy or dark like tobie123 's friend. Additionally, the threshold for minors should probably be reduced, IMO someone who gets 10+ faults in 45 minutes is screwing up too often to be a qualified driver.
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barnetlad
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I think that it should be the same age for cars and for mopeds, be it 17 or 18. It should also be a higher age for anyone who regularly watches Top Gear to reflect that their attitude to motoring is more likely to lead to a view that a driving licence is a right not a privilege.
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tobie123
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(Original post by AmateurRocketman)
I think the age to start lessons should be lowered to 16, but tests still at 17+, so the keenies who might rush through an intensive course will instead have the best part of a year's experience, in a variety of conditions so they don't get scared the first time a drive is rainy or dark like tobie123 's friend. Additionally, the threshold for minors should probably be reduced, IMO someone who gets 10+ faults in 45 minutes is screwing up too often to be a qualified driver.
a year of supervised driving would work well. You shouldn't be allowed to pass until you have regularly driven in all road conditions. the lad I got a lift with had never driven in the dark before
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XMaramena
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(Original post by tobie123)
It is ridiculous that at 17 you are allowed to drive a car but aren't old enough to drink in a pub. I think 17 is too young to be driving, especially for boys who are still immature at that age. Most 17 year old drivers crash soon after passing
The reason it's not 18 is because there's no requirement to go to sixth form college to do A levels. So when you leave school, you should be able to get a job and commute to work. How do you expect someone living where there's no public transport to get to work each morning if they're not allowed to learn to drive? Talk about forcing benefits on people much...
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tobie123
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(Original post by XMaramena)
The reason it's not 18 is because there's no requirement to go to sixth form college to do A levels. So when you leave school, you should be able to get a job and commute to work. How do you expect someone living where there's no public transport to get to work each morning if they're not allowed to learn to drive? Talk about forcing benefits on people much...
maybe if you have a full time job you should be allowed. If you're in school still there is no need for a car
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XMaramena
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(Original post by tobie123)
maybe if you have a full time job you should be allowed. If you're in school still there is no need for a car
What happens when your college is 10 miles from home?
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tobie123
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(Original post by XMaramena)
What happens when your college is 10 miles from home?
schools / colleges usually have good bus routes as most pupils can't drive anyway
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XMaramena
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(Original post by tobie123)
schools / colleges usually have good bus routes as most pupils can't drive anyway
Ah. Usually. If you live out in a rural area, that's often not the case.

Just another reason why they won't be increasing the driving age.
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tobie123
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(Original post by XMaramena)
Ah. Usually. If you live out in a rural area, that's often not the case.

Just another reason why they won't be increasing the driving age.
this is what happens when you let kids drive to school, happened near me a couple of years back

http://m.greenocktelegraph.co.uk/new..._school_gates/
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testing1234568
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(Original post by TeeEm)
definitely and it will happen (on its way)
21 is more appropriate these days.
Any reason for saying this?
(Original post by TeeEm)
Driving is a privilege and not a right
What has this got to do with the topic at hand?
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TeeEm
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(Original post by studentro)
Any reason for saying this?

What has this got to do with the topic at hand?
(a) people are far more immature these days than a generation or two prior
(b) just in case people say I have the right ...

all the best
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Fullofsurprises
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(Original post by tobie123)
I know this would be controversial but maybe the age for girls and boys being able to drive should be different. Keep girls at 17 but increase boys to 19 or 20. this would take boys passsed the school years where they drive to and from school or college with a car full of their mates, which is when most of accidents happen
This kind of thing should be based on analysis of the evidence. Unfortunately, it's a complicated picture, because the raw statistics of car crashes associated with driver age, which seem to point to a big peak in the 17-24 age group, do not factor in driver miles. It clearly matters how much each age group is on the road.
http://www.theguardian.com/politics/...-old-uk-age-18

The over 70s are roughly as prone as young drivers to be involved in crashes - but much less likely to be killed, or kill other people, when they have them.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-24204489

The insurance industry, pointing out that 1 in 3 of road fatalities are caused by young drivers and that many of these happen at night, has proposed that younger drivers should face a curfew. (This happens in some countries.)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/articl...g-ban-on-young

Oh and 75% of young-driver-caused fatalities on the roads were caused by young male drivers.
https://www.drivelikeagirl.com/are-y...ung-women.html
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XMaramena
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(Original post by tobie123)
this is what happens when you let kids drive to school, happened near me a couple of years back

http://m.greenocktelegraph.co.uk/new..._school_gates/
that's what happens when someone has a car accident.

this is what normally happens when students drive to school

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tobie123
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(Original post by XMaramena)
that's what happens when someone has a car accident.

this is what normally happens when students drive to school

every school will have similar stories
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tobie123
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Oh and 75% of young-driver-caused fatalities on the roads were caused by young male drivers.
https://www.drivelikeagirl.com/are-y...ung-women.html[/QUOTE]

so this backs up my comment that boys should have to wait a couple more years before being allowed to drive
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TheThugSlug
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(Original post by tobie123)
I know this would be controversial but maybe the age for girls and boys being able to drive should be different. Keep girls at 17 but increase boys to 19 or 20. this would take boys passsed the school years where they drive to and from school or college with a car full of their mates, which is when most of accidents happen
http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/tom-...b_3428489.html

Women drivers are apparently 40% more likely to get in accidents.

Also, that is sexist as ****. If you want unequal laws like this then don't complain if men earn more.
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