How come the war in Yemen is relatively unknown?

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Chrissy.98
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After doing research on the war in Yemen and asking people about it, I got replies concerning the country being famous for salmon fishing and it being a hotbed for terrorism.

The situation is horrific:

- There is a proxy war between the gulf states and Iran (since Iran supports the Houthi Rebels)
- Terrorism is being allowed to grow at an alarming rate
- Around 6000 people have died according to the UN and this figure is rising quickly
- A terrifying humanitarian need with "4 out of 5 Yemenis" needing aid, largely due to the blockade by the coalition, which also means it is difficult for aid to get into the country
- The West is exporting arms to the Saudis which are likely being used on civilians in Yemen, with the possibility of the UK being tried for war crimes for supplying them
- This is only part of the story

How come this conflict isn't as known as much as those in Syria and Iraq for example?
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MatureStudent36
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It's well reported on.

Out of interest, ask people what they think about Tokyo city's new plans for improving their transport infrastructure.
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Chrissy.98
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
It's well reported on.

Out of interest, ask people what they think about Tokyo city's new plans for improving their transport infrastructure.
It's well reported on if you look for it. But the Economist recently called it the "forgotten war" and they certainly aren't alone. The west has certainly payed it relatively little attention compared to elsewhere. I personally haven't seen a thread about it on this forum either.
Many major cities are aiming at improving infrastructure and becoming more sustainable, but what is happening in Yemen is a rutheless war with major geopolitical implications. I have read that the Gulf States are more concerned with Yemen than Syria itself.
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Andy98
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It's because the politicians of the West don't give a **** about Yemen.

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Josb
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(Original post by Chrissy.98)
After doing research on the war in Yemen and asking people about it, I got replies concerning the country being famous for salmon fishing and it being a hotbed for terrorism.

The situation is horrific:

- There is a proxy war between the gulf states and Iran (since Iran supports the Houthi Rebels)
- Terrorism is being allowed to grow at an alarming rate
- Around 6000 people have died according to the UN and this figure is rising quickly
- A terrifying humanitarian need with "4 out of 5 Yemenis" needing aid, largely due to the blockade by the coalition, which also means it is difficult for aid to get into the country
- The West is exporting arms to the Saudis which are likely being used on civilians in Yemen, with the possibility of the UK being tried for war crimes for supplying them
- This is only part of the story

How come this conflict isn't as known as much as those in Syria and Iraq for example?
You forgot to say the Saudi have targeted Yemen's World Heritage sites - and destroyed them.

The Saudi are our "allies", so it's ok. If Russia had done a tenth of that there would have been a lot of reports in the media.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by Chrissy.98)
It's well reported on if you look for it. But the Economist recently called it the "forgotten war" and they certainly aren't alone. The west has certainly payed it relatively little attention compared to elsewhere. I personally haven't seen a thread about it on this forum either.
Many major cities are aiming at improving infrastructure and becoming more sustainable, but what is happening in Yemen is a rutheless war with major geopolitical implications. I have read that the Gulf States are more concerned with Yemen than Syria itself.
Yemen ceased to be of any strategic importance since ships converted from coal to fuel oil.

Iran for some time has been supporting anti west & anti Saudi dissent wherever it can. (Palestine, Iraq, Yemen, Afghanistan.) and they've done a reasonable job at getting useful idiots in the west on board.

As with rocket attacks against Israel, Irans activities in Yemen isn't about turning the tide, it's about costing the other guys so much money them at they change their stance.

The west has paid Yemen significant interest. US forces have been active in the area for some time. Prior to that UK forces were rather heavily involved in the area.

You'll probably find that the recent violence has been driven by Iran trying to undo all of that work.
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Chrissy.98
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(Original post by MatureStudent36)
Yemen ceased to be of any strategic importance since ships converted from coal to fuel oil.

Iran for some time has been supporting anti west & anti Saudi dissent wherever it can. (Palestine, Iraq, Yemen, Afghanistan.) and they've done a reasonable job at getting useful idiots in the west on board.

As with rocket attacks against Israel, Irans activities in Yemen isn't about turning the tide, it's about costing the other guys so much money them at they change their stance.

The west has paid Yemen significant interest. US forces have been active in the area for some time. Prior to that UK forces were rather heavily involved in the area.

You'll probably find that the recent violence has been driven by Iran trying to undo all of that work.
You make some interesting points here.
However I believe Iran has also been helping the Houthis to spread its influence further across the region. Now the Houthis have the capital, there is a strong incentive for Iran to help them capture the rest of the country. Also, having a border with Saudi Arabia, they would be in a position to cause the Saudis trouble.

I believe that UK and US only had troops in order to combat AQAP (unless you are referring to colonisation by the UK?). But since the revolution of 2011 they have been pulling back and have no real role in the war apart from the odd drone strike on terrorists. But for a variety of reasons due to the war, AQAP and now even IS are growing.

Yemen also does have a somewhat strategic importance. The Houthis and Iran could easily block off the Bab Al-Mandab strait and block off trade to and from the Suez Canal. Aden is also a vital port. There are small amounts of oil and gas in Yemen, despite the resources being in far smaller quantities than its neighbours, we need all we can get.
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TheLoneArab
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Yemeni here.
The belligerents:
Shiite Houthis, Muslim Brotherhood and former dicator Ali Abdullah Saleh's militas VS the South Yemeni Resistance, Yemeni goverment, Saudi Arabia, UAE (with bit part played by other Gulf and African states)

This isnt as bad as Syria/Iraq because the Saudis and Emirates were suprisingly effective (considering their reputation for being dumb and crap ar war) at destroying most of the arms in Yemen unlike the disaster the West and Russia have made in Syria meaning no large scale damage could be done hence less refugees and relatively calm in quite a lot of areas.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Josb)
You forgot to say the Saudi have targeted Yemen's World Heritage sites - and destroyed them.

The Saudi are our "allies", so it's ok. If Russia had done a tenth of that there would have been a lot of reports in the media.
Even more similarities with ISIS then.
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Josb
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(Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
Even more similarities with ISIS then.
ISIS and the Saudi are driven by the same ideology.
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ChaoticButterfly
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(Original post by Josb)
ISIS and the Saudi are driven by the same ideology.
*gasp*
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Chrissy.98
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(Original post by TheLoneArab)
Yemeni here.
The belligerents:
Shiite Houthis, Muslim Brotherhood and former dicator Ali Abdullah Saleh's militas VS the South Yemeni Resistance, Yemeni goverment, Saudi Arabia, UAE (with bit part played by other Gulf and African states)

This isnt as bad as Syria/Iraq because the Saudis and Emirates were suprisingly effective (considering their reputation for being dumb and crap ar war) at destroying most of the arms in Yemen unlike the disaster the West and Russia have made in Syria meaning no large scale damage could be done hence less refugees and relatively calm in quite a lot of areas.
I had not thought of this. Perhaps a reason for it is because of the complexities of the Syrian conflict, with the West arming various rebel groups instead of targeting Assad, not really having a clue on what it was doing. Compared to the coalition having a clear goal on who their enemy is and what to do about them.

However despite this success, there is still worldwide condemnation of the imprecision of their attacks and the international community says that a resolution to the conflict cannot be found through the coalition's attacks. If the Houthis were defeated though, there may be a power vacuum over some areas of the country. It has the potential for the conflict to become a lot worse.
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sebklaine
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Speaking as a person living in Saudi, everyone here is prone to forgetting we're at war too. It's really quite a terrible situation.
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Aj12
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(Original post by sebklaine)
Speaking as a person living in Saudi, everyone here is prone to forgetting we're at war too. It's really quite a terrible situation.
That's really odd, given that missiles have been shot into Saudi from Yemen (though intercepted) I suppose everyone is so focused on Syria the media wants to focus on one story per region.
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TheLoneArab
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(Original post by Chrissy.98)
I had not thought of this. Perhaps a reason for it is because of the complexities of the Syrian conflict, with the West arming various rebel groups instead of targeting Assad, not really having a clue on what it was doing. Compared to the coalition having a clear goal on who their enemy is and what to do about them.

However despite this success, there is still worldwide condemnation of the imprecision of their attacks and the international community says that a resolution to the conflict cannot be found through the coalition's attacks. If the Houthis were defeated though, there may be a power vacuum over some areas of the country. It has the potential for the conflict to become a lot worse.
The biggest danger in Yemen is the Muslim Brotherhood faction there know as Hizb Al-Islah. The Muslim Brotherhood is banned in Saudi Arabia and the UAE and are enemies with eachother. Should the Yemeni resistence and the coalition heavly weaken the Muslim Brotherhood in Yemen then the Houthi and Ali Saleh's militas will be overrun with ease due to the fact they are all mercenaries and will pack up once the money drys up or they start suffering heavy losses.

The situation is far better in Yemen than in Iraq and Syria because the politics there are very different. I cannot see isis EVER getting a foothold in Yemen and thankfully so. Lets just hope the Muslim Brotherhood and Hezbollah (houthis) can be smashed.
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TheLoneArab
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(Original post by Aj12)
That's really odd, given that missiles have been shot into Saudi from Yemen (though intercepted) I suppose everyone is so focused on Syria the media wants to focus on one story per region.
40 year old Scud missiles fired at Saudi Arabia who has the latest Patriot defense system is not a major problem. Most missiles fired ended up crashing long before the reached the Saudi border.
What im suprised most about is how the Saudis and UAE were far more reactive about Yemen compared to Syria. They even pulled out of Syria completely when their attention turned to Yemen as soon as the militas were near the border of Aden.
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by Chrissy.98)
I had not thought of this. Perhaps a reason for it is because of the complexities of the Syrian conflict, with the West arming various rebel groups instead of targeting Assad, not really having a clue on what it was doing. Compared to the coalition having a clear goal on who their enemy is and what to do about them.

However despite this success, there is still worldwide condemnation of the imprecision of their attacks and the international community says that a resolution to the conflict cannot be found through the coalition's attacks. If the Houthis were defeated though, there may be a power vacuum over some areas of the country. It has the potential for the conflict to become a lot worse.
Who's the west arming again?
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MatureStudent36
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(Original post by TheLoneArab)
40 year old Scud missiles fired at Saudi Arabia who has the latest Patriot defense system is not a major problem. Most missiles fired ended up crashing long before the reached the Saudi border.
What im suprised most about is how the Saudis and UAE were far more reactive about Yemen compared to Syria. They even pulled out of Syria completely when their attention turned to Yemen as soon as the militas were near the border of Aden.
Yemen borders Saudi. Syria doesn't.

Nobody wants a civil war or armed aggression on their borders.

40 year old Scud missiles have the same impact as the cheap and cheerful unguided missiles that the Iranians supply Hamas to launch at Israel. They're ridiculously expensive to shoot down.
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Chrissy.98
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Happy new year everyone!

(Original post by TheLoneArab)
The biggest danger in Yemen is the Muslim Brotherhood faction there know as Hizb Al-Islah. The Muslim Brotherhood is banned in Saudi Arabia and the UAE and are enemies with eachother. Should the Yemeni resistence and the coalition heavly weaken the Muslim Brotherhood in Yemen then the Houthi and Ali Saleh's militas will be overrun with ease due to the fact they are all mercenaries and will pack up once the money drys up or they start suffering heavy losses.

The situation is far better in Yemen than in Iraq and Syria because the politics there are very different. I cannot see isis EVER getting a foothold in Yemen and thankfully so. Lets just hope the Muslim Brotherhood and Hezbollah (houthis) can be smashed.
I'm surprised that you mention that Al-Islah plays such a pivotal role. I thought that they have lost most of their political power and have become dispersed. Sadly if this is true, it makes them extremely hard to defeat as they hide within tribes, similarly to AQAP.
I certainly hope that you are correct about IS, it would be disastrous if they were to obtain a foothold there, but the whole region seems to specialise in complete surprises!


(Original post by MatureStudent36)
Who's the west arming again?
Some of the many of "Moderate" Syrian rebel groups who may have links with terrorism
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captainslow69
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Because Yemen doesn't have any oil
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