Maz0110
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Hey I'm doing my GCSEs in June but I have really bad anxiety. Does anyone have any tips on how I can be properly prepared for my exams? Knowing that Ill do good on the exam is the only thing that will lower my anxiety. thankyou
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Awais_
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Same here but just revise a lot and do a practise paper then mark it and grade it and if you do well you might boost your confidence
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Blondie987
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I try to remember that bad and good things will happen regardless and I can't control that so there's no point in worrying, I know this isn't so simple when you have anxiety but it's kind of a sobering realisation that I like to keep in the back of my mind
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Awais_
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(Original post by Maz0110)
Hey I'm doing my GCSEs in June but I have really bad anxiety. Does anyone have any tips on how I can be properly prepared for my exams? Knowing that Ill do good on the exam is the only thing that will lower my anxiety. thankyou
Also use 'Gojimo' I'm advertising this great app so much because it's helped me so much!!

It's amazinf!!
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username2088165
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Hi, here are some tips to hopefully help lower your anxiety, which I used when doing my A Levels:

Before the exams:

1) Make sure to start revising well before your exams. Leaving yourself plenty of time to revise will help to avoid stressing out about running out of time to cover all of the material. It sounds obvious, but it's really easy to leave starting revision too late!
2) Use any mock exams/class tests you have to try different revision techniques to find the one/ones which work best for you. The earlier you figure out what helps you learn best, the better and the easier revising for the real exams will be.
3) Try using a revision timetable. One method to try is organising your revision using specific timeframes. For example, revise for 45 minutes, then take a 15 minute break, revise for 45 minutes, take a break for 15, and so on. Alternatively, if sticking to times is too stressful, allocate material to learn to certain days. For example, revise topics A B and C on Saturday, topics D E and F on Sunday, and so on. This way, you can still keep on top of your revision without having to worry about sticking to certain times.
4) Ask for help from your teachers if you need it. If there are revision sessions or other help sessions available, make sure to take advantage of them if you're struggling, so that you don't fall too far behind.

During the exams:

1) Remember this phrase: "Don't get stuck, move on". During your exams, whenever you come across a question which you don't understand or can't think of an answer to quickly, take a deep breath, put a little mark next to it and move on to the next one. If there is time at the end of the exam, go back to the questions you marked, and see whether you can answer them having done the rest of the paper. Using this method means that you don't waste any time on questions you're unsure about, and also doesn't allow time for anxiety about not knowing the answers to build up.
2) If there are any formulas or equations (for example in science or maths), which you know will not be given to you on the paper, write them down at the start of the exam so that you don't forget them, and you can then refer back to them if you need them.

I hope you find these tips helpful, and best of luck with your exams!
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Maz0110
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(Original post by Conceited)
Listen, you're gonna have people giving you inspirational codswallop; I know this 'cause I had the exact same thing. Being anxious and worried about the exam will not get you anywhere. Just accept the fact that you're gonna have to take the exam along with all your peers. Revise things you're not sure off - that's what'll get you the marks. You seem intelligent enough to seek advice, you'll do fine.
Thank you
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Maz0110
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[QUOTE=Leviathan1741;61652401]Hi, here are some tips to hopefully help lower your anxiety, which I used when doing my A Levels:

Before the exams:

1) Make sure to start revising well before your exams. Leaving yourself plenty of time to revise will help to avoid stressing out about running out of time to cover all of the material. It sounds obvious, but it's really easy to leave starting revision too late!
2) Use any mock exams/class tests you have to try different revision techniques to find the one/ones which work best for you. The earlier you figure out what helps you learn best, the better and the easier revising for the real exams will be.
3) Try using a revision timetable. One method to try is organising your revision using specific timeframes. For example, revise for 45 minutes, then take a 15 minute break, revise for 45 minutes, take a break for 15, and so on. Alternatively, if sticking to times is too stressful, allocate material to learn to certain days. For example, revise topics A B and C on Saturday, topics D E and F on Sunday, and so on. This way, you can still keep on top of your revision without having to worry about sticking to certain times.
4) Ask for help from your teachers if you need it. If there are revision sessions or other help sessions available, make sure to take advantage of them if you're struggling, so that you don't fall too far behind.

During the exams:

1) Remember this phrase: "Don't get stuck, move on". During your exams, whenever you come across a question which you don't understand or can't think of an answer to quickly, take a deep breath, put a little mark next to it and move on to the next one. If there is time at the end of the exam, go back to the questions you marked, and see whether you can answer them having done the rest of the paper. Using this method means that you don't waste any time on questions you're unsure about, and also doesn't allow time for anxiety about not knowing the answers to build up.
2) If there are any formulas or equations (for example in science or maths), which you know will not be given to you on the paper, write them down at the start of the exam so that you don't forget them, and you can then refer back to them if you need them.

I hope you find these tips helpful, and best of luck with your exams! [/QUOTE

Thankyou and yeh this did help
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Maz0110
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(Original post by Blondie987)
I try to remember that bad and good things will happen regardless and I can't control that so there's no point in worrying, I know this isn't so simple when you have anxiety but it's kind of a sobering realisation that I like to keep in the back of my mind
True I guess thankyou
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Edosawr
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After you've done the first few exams, all the worry will be out and you won't get as anxious for the rest. Well, that's what happens to me anyways!!👍🏼

It sounds strange, but it's totally true (for me)! I guess I kinda just get bored of it and then I don't get as worried...


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