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    Knew that subject line would get your attention But what do you guys think of this? Fair? Unfair? Good idea or not? Discuss...

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    DfES urged to waive fee for maths degree
    Students may have no university fees to pay if taking a mathematics degree to help address the crisis in the subject in schools, colleges and universities. This drastic course of action may be on the cards due to a recent 180-page government inquiry.

    According to the inquiry, carried out by Professor Adrian Smith, principal of Queen Mary College, University of London, maths education of 14- to 19-year-olds is severely substandard. More than one in four maths lessons are taught by under-qualified teachers, due to an estimated 3,500 shortage of maths teachers in secondary schools. Also, there has been a 20 per cent slump in numbers taking A-level maths.

    Academics suggested that the government would have to waive university fees for maths students, and even consider paying students directly to take it, in order to counter the current crisis.
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    In my school no teachers in the maths department actually have a maths degree. My A-level class is taught at the same time (with same teacher in the same room) as an AS class.

    MB
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    I don't believe they should get paid, or even get it free however if they go and woik for public sector jobs where maths is needed such as a maths teacher they should perhaps get their loans and fees repaid if they have worked for more than two years or somthing.
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    (Original post by musicboy)
    In my school no teachers in the maths department actually have a maths degree. My A-level class is taught at the same time (with same teacher in the same room) as an AS class.

    MB
    Ouch.

    I'm lucky enough to have two very good maths teachers, one with a maths degree and one with a chem degree.

    I don't think that's fair, to be given substandard teachers, no wonder so many people hate maths.
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    Its to encourage students to take the subject up at degree level, its similiar to the 'dumbing' down of Maths A-level for next year, its only meant as an enticement.

    You could compare it to employment, if a job pays more then why not?
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    (Original post by Mysticmin)
    Ouch.

    I'm lucky enough to have two very good maths teachers, one with a maths degree and one with a chem degree.

    I don't think that's fair, to be given substandard teachers, no wonder so many people hate maths.
    It doesn't stop me loving maths. It just makes my life harder when I have an AAA offer.
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    My teacher for years 9-12 had degrees in engineering and law. My current teacher has a first degree in maths and a doctorate in chemistry. Overqualified?
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    (Original post by ZJuwelH)
    My teacher for years 9-12 had degrees in engineering and law. My current teacher has a first degree in maths and a doctorate in chemistry. Overqualified?
    Do they teach general studies?
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    The maths teachers in my school are actually quite good. The teacher I had last year has a maths degree from cambridge. He's leaving now though and going to a private school!
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    My teacher for years 9-12 had degrees in engineering and law. My current teacher has a first degree in maths and a doctorate in chemistry. Overqualified?
    Nope, when the whole department has phD then you start to worry....
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    (Original post by Bhaal85)
    Do they teach general studies?
    They teach me maths biiiatch!

    I hope to settle down in that career when I'm a bit old (maths teacher that is). I hope the climate in that particular labour market is still in my favour by then.
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    So if they do this, does anyone think they should be looking to do it in other subjects also?
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    liverpool uni wanted a freind of mine to choose to go to them instead of another one, so they offered him a 100 quid for each A he gets. in the end he didnt choose them but he got 5 As. he could of have 500 quid
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    Jion the army, get paid to do your degree.
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    My Maths teacher is very good, all Maths teacher at my school have a degree in Maths or a degree in education with Maths.
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    Mine had a degree in Psycology...
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    I have to get an A in maths for my university place. I have a friend who is going to do maths at uni (crap uni admittedly and not really a friend, just an aquaintance) and only needs a C!

    MB

    I think it's only fair that people doing hard, boring subjects like maths over easy-peasy subjects like english shouldn't have to pay as much fees


    Seriously though, it would definitely convince me to do a maths degree, but only over other mathematical subjects like physics and engineering, of which there are also a shortage of graduates. It seems a bit pointless to me, but I'm obviously in favour of anything that might get me free fees.
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    I think that you should only be paid if you actually took a job as a maths teacher; maths graduates going into different jobs won't really help sort out the teaching problem.
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    its all well and good giving waiving fees for maths people...doesnt mean that they'll graduate thou.

    my year began with only 150 of us (which is not very many) and were already down to below 100. and thats before first year exams. once you've taken into account the amount of people who will fail the first year and those who'll go home over the summer and decide not to return, we'll prob be in the 70's entering the second year...how many will graduate is anyones guess.

    love Katy***
 
 
 
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