822
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basically i was wondering which ones more beneficial?

which ones more stimulating?

and which ones better overall?


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scphmapd
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I would choose physics, there is a huge shortage of people at the moment in the UK that have studied physics at any level. Once you get to explore the subject it becomes very exciting. Of course computer science can also be enjoyable put physics can be challenging and covers a huge range of topics.


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I would have thought jobs will be more plentiful and BIG $$$ in comsci, especially as computing becomes more integral to our society and especially if your course is from a top uni.

In regards to which one is more stimulating thats completely subjective.
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Terry Tibbs
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Could be argued that computer science would lead to better employability.
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(Original post by 822)
basically i was wondering which ones more beneficial?

which ones more stimulating?

and which ones better overall?


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Both are very useful, so pick whatever you enjoy more cause you'll do better at it
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(Original post by scphmapd)
I would choose physics, there is a huge shortage of people at the moment in the UK that have studied physics at any level. Once you get to explore the subject it becomes very exciting. Of course computer science can also be enjoyable put physics can be challenging and covers a huge range of topics.


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what could i do with a physics degree?


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(Original post by kieran12321LFC)
Both are very useful, so pick whatever you enjoy more cause you'll do better at it
im leaning towards computer science but physics seems interesting aswell so im kinda stuck


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Tai Ga
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comp sci

only cuz i'm biased since i do it.
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(Original post by Tai Ga)
comp sci

only cuz i'm biased since i do it.
how far are you into computer science?


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How about a physics degree with some programming in it? That way you can transfer into computer science as a job afterwards.

Both have high employability (which is best depends on who you ask).
Both make good money (again, which is best depends on who you ask).
Computer science is definitely the easier degree.
Computer science has the lower drop out/failure rate.
Physics has labs - something that you may see as highly attractive or a huge disadvantage.
Physics is more maths while computer science is more code.
Physics has space stuff and space is cool. Computer science is more down to earth.
Physics would give a wider range of options at the end.
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(Original post by Keyhofi)
How about a physics degree with some programming in it? That way you can transfer into computer science as a job afterwards.

Both have high employability (which is best depends on who you ask).
Both make good money (again, which is best depends on who you ask).
Computer science is definitely the easier degree.
Computer science has the lower drop out/failure rate.
Physics has labs - something that you may see as highly attractive or a huge disadvantage.
Physics is more maths while computer science is more code.
Physics has space stuff and space is cool. Computer science is more down to earth.
Physics would give a wider range of options at the end.

what could i do with a physics degree? i mean with computer science i could do a range of jobs but physics seems narrow.


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hellodave5
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(Original post by Keyhofi)
How about a physics degree with some programming in it? That way you can transfer into computer science as a job afterwards.

Both have high employability (which is best depends on who you ask).
Both make good money (again, which is best depends on who you ask).
Computer science is definitely the easier degree.
Computer science has the lower drop out/failure rate.
Physics has labs - something that you may see as highly attractive or a huge disadvantage.
Physics is more maths while computer science is more code.
Physics has space stuff and space is cool. Computer science is more down to earth.
Physics would give a wider range of options at the end.
A bit biased, no?
28k as a physics PhD studentship? o.O
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(Original post by 822)
what could i do with a physics degree? i mean with computer science i could do a range of jobs but physics seems narrow.
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Computer science degrees are mostly limited to computer science or programming jobs. Physics degrees are more highly valued (perhaps because they have been around longer and are known for their difficulty) and let you move into pretty much any industry you want so long as your analytical skills can be applied.

(Original post by hellodave5)
A bit biased, no?
28k as a physics PhD studentship? o.O
EngD rather than PhD because I want to work in industry rather than academia. Industry pays more and the EngD is much more employable (91% employment after six months compared to 74% from PhDs).
And my EngD is in machine learning, which is more in the realms of computer science than physics, so I'm biased both ways
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(Original post by 822)
im leaning towards computer science but physics seems interesting aswell so im kinda stuck


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Hi there,

I am currently in year 13 and study Maths, Physics and Computer Science. To me Physics and Maths were the best A-levels I possibly could have chosen. I enjoy Physics not only cos of the future job prospects but MAINLY because of the knowledge and fun you receive from the subject.
Can honestly say since year 12 I haven't hated one lesson! Physics is an amazing subject at A-level. Hope that helps, if you have any questions just ask.
P.S I am applying for a Mechanical Engineering degree so kinda needed maths and physics.
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hellodave5
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(Original post by Keyhofi)
Computer science degrees are mostly limited to computer science or programming jobs. Physics degrees are more highly valued (perhaps because they have been around longer and are known for their difficulty) and let you move into pretty much any industry you want so long as your analytical skills can be applied.


EngD rather than PhD because I want to work in industry rather than academia. Industry pays more and the EngD is much more employable (91% employment after six months compared to 74% from PhDs).
And my EngD is in machine learning, which is more in the realms of computer science than physics, so I'm biased both ways
That sounds great! Complex stuff though
Good on ya, I much prefer applied over academia too
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(Original post by Keyhofi)
Computer science degrees are mostly limited to computer science or programming jobs. Physics degrees are more highly valued (perhaps because they have been around longer and are known for their difficulty) and let you move into pretty much any industry you want so long as your analytical skills can be applied.


EngD rather than PhD because I want to work in industry rather than academia. Industry pays more and the EngD is much more employable (91% employment after six months compared to 74% from PhDs).
And my EngD is in machine learning, which is more in the realms of computer science than physics, so I'm biased both ways
so is physics more suited for academic routes rather than industrial?

and which one would you recommend? computer science or physics?




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username1862217
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(Original post by 822)
so is physics more suited for academic routes rather than industrial?

and which one would you recommend? computer science or physics?

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Well I would say with physics you can go into either academia or industry. With comp sci you are much more guided towards industry.

Pick the one that most interests you.
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(Original post by Keyhofi)
Well I would say with physics you can go into either academia or industry. With comp sci you are much more guided towards industry.

Pick the one that most interests you.
thanks for the help and im thinking computer science but physics is tempting but in the end im probably going to choose computer science


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I have made an exactly similar decision quite a while ago, here's my reasoning.
I enjoyed physics because I loved maths, and physics was, to me, the best way you can use mathematics. It's intellectually interesting, and most importantly challenging. Computer science has a lot of these qualities too, it's an application of mathematics, it's definitely challenging and interesting, but I found physics problems much, much more fun.
Here's a piece of advice, if you want to know whether or not you will like physics, do the physics olympiad papers. They're hard and challenging and will make you think. After doing them you will definitely feel brainstunned, but you will also leave with one of two sentiments, you will either be extremely hooked to the subject and this kind of problems and thinking, or you won't. If not, I suggest you go with computer science as the prospects for computer science students is usually better than that for physicists.

Whatever your decision may be, rest assured the two fields are similarly challenging and interesting in their own rights. You just have to find what lights your spark
. Also, remember a very, very important thing. Computer science is as much about programming as chemistry is about mass spectrometry or physics is about building telescopes. Some physics courses do more programming than computer science *Computational physics @ Edinburgh". Computer science is more about the theory of computation, how can you calculate things efficiently, how to find employable algorithms which can solve different problems or families of problems, how to organise data, how to protect data, and so on.
Physics is also more about solving equations, thinking about physical situations and trying to model them mathematically, finding shortcuts and if you go deep enough, physics becomes more of a sea of mathematics that's just so close to being absolutely pure and abstract, than it is about electrons popping in and out of existence or dark matter or black holes.
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(Original post by oShahpo)
I have made an exactly similar decision quite a while ago, here's my reasoning.
I enjoyed physics because I loved maths, and physics was, to me, the best way you can use mathematics. It's intellectually interesting, and most importantly challenging. Computer science has a lot of these qualities too, it's an application of mathematics, it's definitely challenging and interesting, but I found physics problems much, much more fun.
Here's a piece of advice, if you want to know whether or not you will like physics, do the physics olympiad papers. They're hard and challenging and will make you think. After doing them you will definitely feel brainstunned, but you will also leave with one of two sentiments, you will either be extremely hooked to the subject and this kind of problems and thinking, or you won't. If not, I suggest you go with computer science as the prospects for computer science students is usually better than that for physicists.

Whatever your decision may be, rest assured the two fields are similarly challenging and interesting in their own rights. You just have to find what lights your spark
. Also, remember a very, very important thing. Computer science is as much about programming as chemistry is about mass spectrometry or physics is about building telescopes. Some physics courses do more programming than computer science *Computational physics @ Edinburgh". Computer science is more about the theory of computation, how can you calculate things efficiently, how to find employable algorithms which can solve different problems or families of problems, how to organise data, how to protect data, and so on.
Physics is also more about solving equations, thinking about physical situations and trying to model them mathematically, finding shortcuts and if you go deep enough, physics becomes more of a sea of mathematics that's just so close to being absolutely pure and abstract, than it is about electrons popping in and out of existence or dark matter or black holes.
so is physics more maths based than physics based (if that makes sense).


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