Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    Please help, I am so stuck on this.

    Click on my attachments, how would u work out the centre of mass of the right angled triangle? I know that for an isoceles it is 2/3 the way from the vertice, but for the right-angled triangle HOW???
    Attached Images
     
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    For a right angled triangle it is a 1/3 of the way across and 1/3 of the way up of the sides from the point where the right angle occurs.

    Hope that makes sense
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silly Sally)
    For a right angled triangle it is a 1/3 of the way across and 1/3 of the way up of the sides from the point where the right angle occurs.

    Hope that makes sense
    aye so it owuld be (1/3a, a)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    thanks, what about if its a really random triangle with random sides?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    awaits a reply....
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Well i think if you try to find the centre of mass for an isoceles triangle - you have to use the same principle that 2/3 of the way down from the vertix. However - i don't know for scales triangles - to be honest - i don't think we need to find the CoM for a scales triangle. If we do, i would try splitting them into "normal shapes", which we can find the CoM for

    Hope that makes sense!!!

    Are you dreading M2 - i myself am TERRIFIED!!!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    If it's a really complicated one, draw the triangle and join each vertex to the midpoint of the opposite side.. the point where these 3 lines intersect is your centre of mass.

    Then if you use similar triangles, y'know.. GCSE-style.. then you should be able to find out how the distances involved. Hope that makes sense?!
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silly Sally)
    Well i think if you try to find the centre of mass for an isoceles triangle - you have to use the same principle that 2/3 of the way down from the vertix. However - i don't know for scales triangles - to be honest - i don't think we need to find the CoM for a scales triangle. If we do, i would try splitting them into "normal shapes", which we can find the CoM for

    Hope that makes sense!!!

    Are you dreading M2 - i myself am TERRIFIED!!!
    yeah the papers are tough!, i always make a mistake that results in the whole question being wrong!! Do you think u still gain credit for that? Say if u derived a correct method but accidentally inserted a wrong number into the equation, and then used that wrong number to derive the answer with the right method but wrong answer, how much marks would u be able to scrat (assume its a 8 mark question)?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sahir)
    If it's a really complicated one, draw the triangle and join each vertex to the midpoint of the opposite side.. the point where these 3 lines intersect is your centre of mass.

    Then if you use similar triangles, y'know.. GCSE-style.. then you should be able to find out how the distances involved. Hope that makes sense?!
    hey yeah, thanks i finally realised thats what the textbook actually meant, but edexcel grrrr always badly phrase things
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ResidentEvil)
    yeah the papers are tough!, i always make a mistake that results in the whole question being wrong!! Do you think u still gain credit for that? Say if u derived a correct method but accidentally inserted a wrong number into the equation, and then used that wrong number to derive the answer with the right method but wrong answer, how much marks would u be able to scrat (assume its a 8 mark question)?
    you would probably only lose 1 for that error, and as long as all the rest of the method was right you would get ecf. and therefore technically get 7. maybe they would knock off 2 if it was an important thing that you got wrong, or something complicated that you fudged.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Silly Sally)
    For a right angled triangle it is a 1/3 of the way across and 1/3 of the way up of the sides from the point where the right angle occurs.

    Hope that makes sense
    and remember that it is always closest to the right angle - not just a third from the left and a third up (see diag)...i was a bit confused with this at first but now it is all beautifully sensicle!
    Attached Images
     
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    man centres of mass suck
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ResidentEvil)
    man centres of mass suck
    i actually quite like them
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    got any more tips? how about a diagram of a triangle with random sides?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ResidentEvil)
    got any more tips? how about a diagram of a triangle with random sides?
    not sure we need to do them...but in theory you just draw three bisectors and where they meet is the centre of mass (see diag) but i'm not sure how this splits the sides. sorry!
    Attached Images
     
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.